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Author Lu, X.; Peloso, G.M.; Liu, D.J.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, W.; Li, J.; Tang, C.S.-M.; Dorajoo, R.; Li, H.; Long, J.; Guo, X.; Xu, M.; Spracklen, C.N.; Chen, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Khor, C.C.; Liu, J.; Sun, L.; Wang, L.; Gao, Y.-T.; Hu, Y.; Yu, K.; Wang, Y.; Cheung, C.Y.Y.; Wang, F.; Huang, J.; Fan, Q.; Cai, Q.; Chen, S.; Shi, J.; Yang, X.; Zhao, W.; Sheu, W.H.-H.; Cherny, S.S.; He, M.; Feranil, A.B.; Adair, L.S.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Du, S.; Varma, R.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Shu, X.-O.; Lam, K.S.L.; Wong, T.Y.; Ganesh, S.K.; Mo, Z.; Hveem, K.; Fritsche, L.G.; Nielsen, J.B.; Tse, H.-F.; Huo, Y.; Cheng, C.-Y.; Chen, Y.E.; Zheng, W.; Tai, E.S.; Gao, W.; Lin, X.; Huang, W.; Abecasis, G.; Kathiresan, S.; Mohlke, K.L.; Wu, T.; Sham, P.C.; Gu, D.; Willer, C.J.
Title Exome chip meta-analysis identifies novel loci and East Asian-specific coding variants that contribute to lipid levels and coronary artery disease Type Meta-Analysis
Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet
Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1722-1730
Keywords Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; Coronary Artery Disease/ethnology/*genetics; Europe; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; Exome/*genetics; Far East; Gene Frequency; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/ethnology/*genetics; *Genetic Variation; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Lipid Metabolism/*genetics; Lipids/analysis
Abstract Most genome-wide association studies have been of European individuals, even though most genetic variation in humans is seen only in non-European samples. To search for novel loci associated with blood lipid levels and clarify the mechanism of action at previously identified lipid loci, we used an exome array to examine protein-coding genetic variants in 47,532 East Asian individuals. We identified 255 variants at 41 loci that reached chip-wide significance, including 3 novel loci and 14 East Asian-specific coding variant associations. After a meta-analysis including >300,000 European samples, we identified an additional nine novel loci. Sixteen genes were identified by protein-altering variants in both East Asians and Europeans, and thus are likely to be functional genes. Our data demonstrate that most of the low-frequency or rare coding variants associated with lipids are population specific, and that examining genomic data across diverse ancestries may facilitate the identification of functional genes at associated loci.
Address Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Corporate Author GLGC Consortium Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29083407 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1957
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Author Nordstoga, A.L.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Vasseljen, O.; Unsgaard-Tondel, M.; Mork, P.J.
Title The influence of multisite pain and psychological comorbidity on prognosis of chronic low back pain: longitudinal data from the Norwegian HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open
Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e015312
Keywords back pain; epidemiology; musculoskeletal disorders; spine
Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the prospective influence of multisite pain, depression, anxiety, self-rated health and pain-related disability on recovery from chronic low back pain (LBP). SETTING: The data is derived from the second (1995-1997) and third (2006-2008) wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: The study population comprises 4484 women and 3039 men in the Norwegian HUNT Study who reported chronic LBP at baseline in 1995-1997. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was recovery from chronic LBP at the 11-year follow-up. Persons not reporting pain and/or stiffness for at least three consecutive months during the last year were defined as recovered. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios (RRs) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: At follow-up, 1822 (40.6%) women and 1578 (51.9%) men reported recovery from chronic LBP. The probability of recovery was inversely associated with number of pain sites (P-trend<0.001). Compared with reporting 2-3 pain sites, persons with only LBP had a slightly higher probability of recovery (RR 1.10, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.22 in women and RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.21 in men), whereas people reporting 6-9 pain sites had substantially lower probability of recovery (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.63 in women and RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.79 in men). Poor/not so good self-rated general health, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and pain-related disability in work and leisure were all associated with reduced probability of recovery, but there was no statistical interaction between multisite pain and these comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing number of pain sites was inversely associated with recovery from chronic LBP. In addition, factors such as poor self-rated health, psychological symptoms and pain-related disability may further reduce the probability of recovery from chronic LBP.
Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28592580; PMCID:PMC5734202 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1967
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Author Naicker, K.; Johnson, J.A.; Skogen, J.C.; Manuel, D.; Overland, S.; Sivertsen, B.; Colman, I.
Title Type 2 Diabetes and Comorbid Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety: Longitudinal Associations With Mortality Risk Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Diabetes Care Abbreviated Journal Diabetes Care
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 352-358
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*complications; Comorbidity; Depression/*complications; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Depression is strongly linked to increased mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Despite high rates of co-occurring anxiety and depression, the risk of death associated with comorbid anxiety in individuals with type 2 diabetes is poorly understood. This study documented the excess mortality risk associated with symptoms of depression and/or anxiety comorbid with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using data for 64,177 Norwegian adults from the second wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2), with linkage to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry, we assessed all-cause mortality from survey participation in 1995 through to 2013. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine mortality risk over 18 years associated with type 2 diabetes status and the presence of comorbid affective symptoms at baseline. RESULTS: Three clear patterns emerged from our findings. First, mortality risk in individuals with diabetes increased in the presence of depression or anxiety, or both. Second, mortality risk was lowest for symptoms of anxiety, higher for comorbid depression-anxiety, and highest for depression. Lastly, excess mortality risk associated with depression and anxiety was observed in men with diabetes but not in women. The highest risk of death was observed in men with diabetes and symptoms of depression only (hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI 1.96, 6.14). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that symptoms of anxiety affect mortality risk in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of symptoms of depression, in addition to attenuating the relationship between depressive symptoms and mortality in these individuals.
Address School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada icolman@uottawa.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0149-5992 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28077458 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1961
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Author Naicker, K.; Overland, S.; Johnson, J.A.; Manuel, D.; Skogen, J.C.; Sivertsen, B.; Colman, I.
Title Symptoms of anxiety and depression in type 2 diabetes: Associations with clinical diabetes measures and self-management outcomes in the Norwegian HUNT study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology
Volume 84 Issue Pages 116-123
Keywords Anxiety; Depression; Diabetes self-management; Metabolic control; Type 2 diabetes
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine if symptoms of depression and anxiety are differentially associated with clinical diabetes measures and self-management behaviours in individuals with Type 2 diabetes, and whether these associations vary by patient sex. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis using data from 2035 adults with Type 2 diabetes in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore associations between symptoms of depression and anxiety and waist girth, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, c-reactive protein, glycemic control, diet adherence, exercise, glucose monitoring, foot checks for ulcers, and the subjective patient experience. Analyses were stratified by sex. RESULTS: Depression was associated with a lower likelihood of avoiding saturated fats (OR=0.20 [95% CI: 0.06, 0.68]) and increased odds of physical inactivity (OR=1.69 [95% CI: 1.37, 2.72]). Anxiety was associated with increased odds of eating vegetables (OR=1.66 [95% CI: 1.02, 2.73]), and an over two-fold increase of feeling that having diabetes is difficult. In women, anxiety was associated with elevated c-reactive protein levels (OR=1.57 [95% CI: 1.05, 2.34]). In men, depressive symptoms were associated with elevated HbA1c (OR=5.00 [95% CI: 1.15, 8.23). CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of depression and anxiety were differentially associated with some key diabetes-related measures. Our results suggest sex-specific differences with respect to two important clinical outcomes (i.e., anxiety and CRP in women and depression and glycemic control in men). These findings should alert practitioners to the importance of detection and management of psychological symptoms in individuals with Type 2 diabetes.
Address School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario Canada. Electronic address: icolman@uottawa.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28704763 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1962
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nauman, J.; Nes, B.M.; Lavie, C.J.; Jackson, A.S.; Sui, X.; Coombes, J.S.; Blair, S.N.; Wisloff, U.
Title Prediction of Cardiovascular Mortality by Estimated Cardiorespiratory Fitness Independent of Traditional Risk Factors: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc
Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 218-227
Keywords Adult; Aged; *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Ischemia/mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Registries; Risk Factors; Stroke/mortality
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) and evaluate the additional contribution of traditional risk factors in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality prediction. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: The study included healthy men (n=18,721) and women (n=19,759) aged 30 to 74 years. A nonexercise algorithm estimated cardiorespiratory fitness. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the primary (CVD mortality) and secondary (all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and stroke mortality) end points. The added predictive value of traditional CVD risk factors was evaluated using the Harrell C statistic and net reclassification improvement. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 16.3 years (range, 0.04-17.4 years), there were 3863 deaths, including 1133 deaths from CVD (734 men and 399 women). Low eCRF was a strong predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality after adjusting for established risk factors. The C statistics for eCRF and CVD mortality were 0.848 (95% CI, 0.836-0.861) and 0.878 (95% CI, 0.862-0.894) for men and women, respectively, increasing to 0.851 (95% CI, 0.839-0.863) and 0.881 (95% CI, 0.865-0.897), respectively, when adding clinical variables. By adding clinical variables to eCRF, the net reclassification improvement of CVD mortality was 0.014 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.051) and 0.052 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.127) in men and women, respectively. CONCLUSION: Low eCRF is independently associated with CVD and all-cause mortality. The inclusion of traditional clinical CVD risk factors added little to risk discrimination and did not improve the classification of risk beyond this simple eCRF measurement, which may be proposed as a practical and cost-effective first-line approach in primary prevention settings.
Address K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0025-6196 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27866655 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1963
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nes, B.M.; Gutvik, C.R.; Lavie, C.J.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U.
Title Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI) for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Promotion of Physical Activity Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Med
Volume 130 Issue 3 Pages 328-336
Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Algorithms; Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality/*prevention & control; *Exercise; Female; Health Promotion/*methods; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment/*methods; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Young Adult; Activity tracking; Cardiovascular disease mortality; Physical activity; Prevention
Abstract PURPOSE: To derive and validate a single metric of activity tracking that associates with lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. METHODS: We derived an algorithm, Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI), using the HUNT Fitness Study (n = 4631), and validated it in the general HUNT population (n = 39,298) aged 20-74 years. The PAI was divided into three sex-specific groups (</=50, 51-99, and >/=100), and the inactive group (0 PAI) was used as the referent. Hazard ratios for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: After >1 million person-years of observations during a mean follow-up time of 26.2 (SD 5.9) years, there were 10,062 deaths, including 3867 deaths (2207 men and 1660 women) from cardiovascular disease. Men and women with a PAI level >/=100 had 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-27%) and 23% (95% CI, 4%-38%) reduced risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, compared with the inactive groups. Obtaining >/=100 PAI was associated with significantly lower risk for cardiovascular disease mortality in all prespecified age groups, and in participants with known cardiovascular disease risk factors (all P-trends <.01). Participants who did not obtain >/=100 PAI had increased risk of dying regardless of meeting the physical activity recommendations. CONCLUSION: PAI may have a huge potential to motivate people to become and stay physically active, as it is an easily understandable and scientifically proven metric that could inform potential users of how much physical activity is needed to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular disease death.
Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9343 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27984009 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1964
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ness-Jensen, E.; Lagergren, J.
Title Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol
Volume 31 Issue 5 Pages 501-508
Keywords Causality; Disease management; Ethanol; Gastroesophageal reflux; Smoking; Tobacco
Abstract Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when reflux of gastric content causes troublesome symptoms or complications. The main symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation and complications include oesophagitis, strictures, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition to hereditary influence, GORD is associated with lifestyle factors, mainly obesity. Tobacco smoking is regarded as an aetiological factor of GORD, while alcohol consumption is considered a triggering factor of reflux episodes and not a causal factor. Yet, both tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption can reduce the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, facilitating reflux. In addition, tobacco smoking reduces the production of saliva rich in bicarbonate, which is important for buffering and clearance of acid in the oesophagus. Alcohol also has a direct noxious effect on the oesophageal mucosa, which predisposes to acidic injury. Tobacco smoking cessation reduces the risk of GORD symptoms and avoidance of alcohol is encouraged in individuals where alcohol consumption triggers reflux.
Address Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden; School of Cancer Sciences, King's College London, SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: jesper.lagergren@ki.se
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1521-6918 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29195669 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1965
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Neumann, L.; Dapp, U.; Jacobsen, W.; van Lenthe, F.; von Renteln-Kruse, W.
Title The MINDMAP project: mental well-being in urban environments : Design and first results of a survey on healthcare planning policies, strategies and programmes that address mental health promotion and mental disorder prevention for older people in Europe Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie Abbreviated Journal Z Gerontol Geriatr
Volume 50 Issue 7 Pages 588-602
Keywords Functional competence; Geriatrics; Longitudinal cohort ageing studies; Mental health; Urban environment
Abstract BACKGROUND: The MINDMAP consortium (2016-2019) aims to identify opportunities provided by the urban environment for the promotion of mental well-being and functioning of older people in Europe by bringing together European cities with urban longitudinal ageing studies: GLOBE, HAPIEE, HUNT, LASA, LUCAS, RECORD, Rotterdam Study, Turin Study. A survey on mental healthcare planning policies and programmes dedicated to older persons covering the range from health promotion to need of nursing care was performed for profound data interpretation in Amsterdam, Eindhoven, Hamburg, Helsinki, Kaunas, Krakow, London, Nord-Trondelag, Paris, Prague, Rotterdam and Turin. OBJECTIVES: To collect detailed information on healthcare planning policies and programmes across these European cities to evaluate variations and to delineate recommendations for sciences, policies and planners using experience from evidence-based practice feedback from the MINDMAP cities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The MINDMAP partners identified experts in the 12 cities with the best background knowledge of the mental health sector. After pretesting, semi-structured telephone interviews (1-2 h) were performed always by the same person. A structured evaluation matrix based on the geriatric functioning continuum and the World Health Organization (WHO) Public Health Framework for Healthy Ageing was applied. RESULTS: A complete survey (12 out of 12) was performed reporting on 41 policies and 280 programmes on the city level. It appeared from extensive analyses that the focus on older citizens, specific target groups, and multidimensional programmes could be intensified. CONCLUSION: There is a broad variety to cope with the challenges of ageing in health, and to address both physical and mental capacities in older individuals and their dynamic interactions in urban environments.
Address Geriatrics Centre, Scientific Department at the University of Hamburg, Albertinen-Haus, Sellhopsweg 18-22, 22459, Hamburg, Germany. w.renteln-kruse@albertinen.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title Das MINDMAP Projekt: mentale Gesundheit in stadtischen Lebensraumen : Design und erste Ergebnisse einer Umfrage zu gesundheitspolitischen Planungen, Strategien und Programmen zur Forderung der mentalen Gesundheit und Pravention mentaler Storungen alterer Menschen in Europa
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0948-6704 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28819693; PMCID:PMC5649390 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1966
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Osthus, I.B.O.; Lydersen, S.; Dalen, H.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U.
Title Association of Telomere Length With Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort From the Population Based HUNT 2 Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis
Volume 59 Issue 6 Pages 649-655
Keywords Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Genetic Markers; Humans; Incidence; Linear Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis/epidemiology/*genetics; Norway/epidemiology; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Telomere/*genetics; *Telomere Homeostasis; Time Factors; Cardiovascular diseases; Myocardial infarction; Prevention; Risk factors; Telomeres
Abstract As possible markers of biological age, telomere length (TL) has been associated with age-related diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI) with conflicting findings. We sought to assess the relationship between TL and risk of future MI in 915 healthy participants (51.7% women) 65 years or older from a population-based prospective cohort (the HUNT 2 study, Norway). Mean TL was measured by quantitative PCR expressed as relative T (telomere repeat copy number) to S (single copy gene number) ratio, and log-transformed. During a mean follow up of 13.0 (SD, 3.2) years and 11,923 person-years, 82 participants were diagnosed with MI. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Relative TL was associated with age in women (P=0.01), but not in men (P=0.43). Using relative TL as a continuous variable, we observed a higher risk of MI in participants with longer telomeres with HRs of 2.46 (95% CI; 1.13 to 4.54) in men, and 2.93 (95% CI; 1.41 to 6.10) in women. Each 1-SD change in relative TL was associated with an HR of 1.54 (95% CI; 1.15 to 2.06) and 1.67 (95% CI; 1.18 to 2.37) in men and women, respectively. Compared with the bottom tertile of relative TL, HR of incident MI in top tertile was 2.71 (95% CI; 1.25 to 5.89) in men, and 3.65 (95% CI; 1.35 to 9.90) in women. Longer telomeres in healthy participants 65 years or older are associated with a high risk of incident MI. Future large scale prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore the potential association between TL and MI.
Address K. G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-0620 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28442329 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1968
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Paulsen, J.; Askim, A.; Mohus, R.M.; Mehl, A.; Dewan, A.; Solligard, E.; Damas, J.K.; Asvold, B.O.
Title Associations of obesity and lifestyle with the risk and mortality of bloodstream infection in a general population: a 15-year follow-up of 64 027 individuals in the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol
Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 1573-1581
Keywords Bacteraemia; alcohol drinking; exercise; obesity; sepsis; smoking
Abstract Background: Bloodstream infections (BSI) cause considerable morbidity and mortality, and primary prevention should be a priority. Lifestyle factors are of particular interest since they represent a modifiable target. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study among participants in the population-based Norwegian HUNT2 Survey, where 64 027 participants were followed from 1995-97 through 2011 by linkage to prospectively recorded information on BSI at local and regional hospitals. The exposures were: baseline body mass index (BMI) measurements; and self-reported smoking habits, leisure time physical activity and alcohol intake. The outcomes were hazard ratios (HR) of BSI and BSI mortality. Results: During 810 453 person-years and median follow-up of 14.8 years, 1844 (2.9%) participants experienced at least one BSI and 396 (0.62%) died from BSI. Compared with normal weight participants (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), the age- and sex-adjusted risk of a first-time BSI was 31% [95% confidence interval (CI) 14-51%] higher at BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m2, 87% (95% CI 50-135%) higher at BMI 35.0-39.9 kg/m2 and 210% (95% CI 117-341%) higher at BMI >/= 40.0 kg/m2. The risk of BSI mortality was similarly increased. Compared with never-smokers, current smokers had 51% (95% CI 34-70%) and 75% (95% CI 34-129%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively. Physically inactive participants had 71% (95% CI 42-107%) and 108% (95% CI 37-216%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively, compared with the most physically active. Conclusions: Obesity, smoking and physical inactivity carry increased risk of BSI and BSI mortality.
Address Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28637260 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1969
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Perreault, K.; Bauman, A.; Johnson, N.; Britton, A.; Rangul, V.; Stamatakis, E.
Title Does physical activity moderate the association between alcohol drinking and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular diseases mortality? A pooled analysis of eight British population cohorts Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication British Journal of Sports Medicine Abbreviated Journal Br J Sports Med
Volume 51 Issue 8 Pages 651-657
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*adverse effects; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; England; *Exercise; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality; Neoplasms/*mortality; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Cancer; Epidemiology; Physical activity; Public health
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine whether physical activity (PA) moderates the association between alcohol intake and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mortality. DESIGN: Prospective study using 8 British population-based surveys, each linked to cause-specific mortality: Health Survey for England (1994, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004 and 2006) and Scottish Health Survey (1998 and 2003). PARTICIPANTS: 36 370 men and women aged 40 years and over were included with a corresponding 5735 deaths and a mean of 353 049 person-years of follow-up. EXPOSURES: 6 sex-specific categories of alcohol intake (UK units/week) were defined: (1) never drunk; (2) ex-drinkers; (3) occasional drinkers; (4) within guidelines (<14 (women); <21 (men)); (5) hazardous (14-35 (women); 21-49 (men)) and (6) harmful (>35 (women) >49 (men)). PA was categorised as inactive (</=7 MET-hour/week), active at the lower (>7.5 MET-hour/week) and upper (>15 MET-hour/week) of recommended levels. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cox proportional-hazard models were used to examine associations between alcohol consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality risk after adjusting for several confounders. Stratified analyses were performed to evaluate mortality risks within each PA stratum. RESULTS: We found a direct association between alcohol consumption and cancer mortality risk starting from drinking within guidelines (HR (95% CI) hazardous drinking: 1.40 (1.11 to 1.78)). Stratified analyses showed that the association between alcohol intake and mortality risk was attenuated (all-cause) or nearly nullified (cancer) among individuals who met the PA recommendations (HR (95% CI)). CONCLUSIONS: Meeting the current PA public health recommendations offsets some of the cancer and all-cause mortality risk associated with alcohol drinking.
Address Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-3674 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27581162 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1970
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quanjer, P.H.; Ruppel, G.L.; Langhammer, A.; Krishna, A.; Mertens, F.; Johannessen, A.; Menezes, A.M.B.; Wehrmeister, F.C.; Perez-Padilla, R.; Swanney, M.P.; Tan, W.C.; Bourbeau, J.
Title Bronchodilator Response in FVC Is Larger and More Relevant Than in FEV1 in Severe Airflow Obstruction Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Chest Abbreviated Journal Chest
Volume 151 Issue 5 Pages 1088-1098
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Airway Obstruction/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Asthma/*diagnosis/physiopathology; *Bronchodilator Agents; Canada; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/*physiology; Healthy Volunteers; Humans; Latin America; Male; Middle Aged; Netherlands; New Zealand; Norway; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Treatment Outcome; United States; Vital Capacity/*physiology; Young Adult; airways obstruction; asthma; bronchodilator responsiveness; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; respiratory physiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Recommendations on interpreting tests of bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) are conflicting. We investigated the dependence of BDR criteria on sex, age, height, ethnicity, and severity of respiratory impairment. METHODS: BDR test data were available from clinical patients in the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United States (n = 15,278; female subjects, 51.7%) and from surveys in Canada, Norway, and five Latin-American countries (n = 16,250; female subjects, 54.7%). BDR calculated according to FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC was expressed as absolute change, a percentage of the baseline level (% baseline), a percentage of the predicted value (% predicted), and z score. RESULTS: Change (Delta) in FEV1 and FVC, in milliliters, was unrelated to the baseline value but was biased toward age, height, sex, and level of airways obstruction; DeltaFEV1 was significantly lower in African Americans. In 1,106 subjects with low FEV1 (200-1,621 mL) the FEV1 increased by 12% to 44.7% relative to baseline but < 200 mL. Expressing BDR as a percentage of the predicted value or as a z score attenuated the bias and made the 200-mL criterion redundant, but reduced positive responses by half. DeltaFEV1 % baseline increased with the level of airflow obstruction but decreased with severe obstruction when expressed as z scores or % predicted; DeltaFVC, however expressed, increased with the level of airflow obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Expressing FEV1 responsiveness as % baseline spuriously suggests that responsiveness increases with the severity of respiratory impairment. Expressing change in FEV1 or FVC as % predicted or as z scores eliminates this artifact and renders the required 200-mL minimum increase redundant. In severe airways obstruction DeltaFVC should be critically evaluated as an index of clinically important relief of hyperinflation, with implications for bronchodilator drug trials.
Address Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0012-3692 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28040521 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1971
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Author Rasouli, B.; Andersson, T.; Carlsson, P.-O.; Grill, V.; Groop, L.; Martinell, M.; Midthjell, K.; Storm, P.; Tuomi, T.; Carlsson, S.
Title Use of Swedish smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association Abbreviated Journal Diabet Med
Volume 34 Issue 4 Pages 514-521
Keywords
Abstract AIMS: It has been suggested that moist snuff (snus), a smokeless tobacco product that is high in nicotine and widespread in Scandinavia, increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes. Previous studies are however few, contradictory and, with regard to autoimmune diabetes, lacking. Our aim was to study the association between snus use and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA). METHOD: Analyses were based on incident cases (Type 2 diabetes, n = 724; LADA, n = 200) and population-based controls (n = 699) from a Swedish case-control study. Additional analyses were performed on cross-sectional data from the Norwegian HUNT study (n = 21 473) with 829 prevalent cases of Type 2 diabetes. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated adjusted for age, BMI family history of diabetes and smoking. Only men were included. RESULTS: No association between snus use and Type 2 diabetes or LADA was seen in the Swedish data. For Type 2 diabetes, the OR for > 10 box-years was 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47 to 2.11] and for LADA 1.01 (95% CI, 0.45 to 2.29). Similarly, in HUNT, the OR for Type 2 diabetes in ever-users was estimated at 0.91 (95% CI, 0.75 to 1.10) and in heavy users at 0.92 (95% CI, 0.46 to 1.83). CONCLUSION: The risk of Type 2 diabetes and LADA is unrelated to the use of snus, despite its high nicotine content. This opens the possibility of the increased risk of Type 2 diabetes seen in smokers may not be attributed to nicotine, but to other substances in tobacco smoke.
Address Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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ISSN 0742-3071 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:27353226 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1972
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Author Retnakaran, R.; Wen, S.W.; Tan, H.; Zhou, S.; Ye, C.; Shen, M.; Smith, G.N.; Walker, M.C.
Title Response to Pre-Pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal Am J Hypertens
Volume 30 Issue 9 Pages e9
Keywords
Abstract
Address Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0895-7061 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28633294 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1973
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Author Safiri, S.; Ayubi, E.
Title Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT study Type Comment
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol
Volume 242 Issue Pages 7
Keywords *Cardiovascular Diseases; Humans; Norway; Risk Factors
Abstract
Address Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: aubi65@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
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Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28619353 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1974
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Author Sardahaee, F.S.; Holmen, T.L.; Micali, N.; Kvaloy, K.
Title Effects of single genetic variants and polygenic obesity risk scores on disordered eating in adolescents – The HUNT study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite
Volume 118 Issue Pages 8-16
Keywords Adolescents; Comt; Disordered eating; Eat-12; Hunt; Obesity polygenic risk score
Abstract PURPOSE: Improving the understanding of the role of genetic risk on disordered eating (DE). METHODS: A case-control study including 1757 (F: 979, M: 778) adolescents (aged 13-19 years) from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), an ethnically homogenous Norwegian population based study. Cases and controls were defined using a shortened version of the Eating Attitude Test. Logistic regression was employed to test for associations between DE phenotypes and 24 obesity and eating disorder susceptibility SNPs, and the joint effect of a subset of these in a genetic risk score (GRS). RESULTS: COMT was shown to be associated with poor appetite/undereating (OR: 0.6, CI 95%: 0.43-0.83, p = 0.002). Independent of obesity associations, the weighted GRS was associated to overeating in 13-15 year old females (OR: 2.07, CI 95%: 1.14-3.76, p = 0.017). Additionally, a significant association was observed between the GRS and loss of control over eating in the total sample (OR: 1.62, CI 95%: 1.01-2.61, p = 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: The COMT variant (rs4680) was associated with poor appetite/undereating. Our study further confirms prior findings that obesity risk also confers risk for loss of control over eating; and overeating amongst girls.
Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Research and Development, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Health Trust, Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: kirsti.kvaloy@ntnu.no
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0195-6663 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28694222 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1975
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Author Scelo, G.; Purdue, M.P.; Brown, K.M.; Johansson, M.; Wang, Z.; Eckel-Passow, J.E.; Ye, Y.; Hofmann, J.N.; Choi, J.; Foll, M.; Gaborieau, V.; Machiela, M.J.; Colli, L.M.; Li, P.; Sampson, J.N.; Abedi-Ardekani, B.; Besse, C.; Blanche, H.; Boland, A.; Burdette, L.; Chabrier, A.; Durand, G.; Le Calvez-Kelm, F.; Prokhortchouk, E.; Robinot, N.; Skryabin, K.G.; Wozniak, M.B.; Yeager, M.; Basta-Jovanovic, G.; Dzamic, Z.; Foretova, L.; Holcatova, I.; Janout, V.; Mates, D.; Mukeriya, A.; Rascu, S.; Zaridze, D.; Bencko, V.; Cybulski, C.; Fabianova, E.; Jinga, V.; Lissowska, J.; Lubinski, J.; Navratilova, M.; Rudnai, P.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Benhamou, S.; Cancel-Tassin, G.; Cussenot, O.; Baglietto, L.; Boeing, H.; Khaw, K.-T.; Weiderpass, E.; Ljungberg, B.; Sitaram, R.T.; Bruinsma, F.; Jordan, S.J.; Severi, G.; Winship, I.; Hveem, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Fletcher, T.; Koppova, K.; Larsson, S.C.; Wolk, A.; Banks, R.E.; Selby, P.J.; Easton, D.F.; Pharoah, P.; Andreotti, G.; Freeman, L.E.B.; Koutros, S.; Albanes, D.; Mannisto, S.; Weinstein, S.; Clark, P.E.; Edwards, T.L.; Lipworth, L.; Gapstur, S.M.; Stevens, V.L.; Carol, H.; Freedman, M.L.; Pomerantz, M.M.; Cho, E.; Kraft, P.; Preston, M.A.; Wilson, K.M.; Michael Gaziano, J.; Sesso, H.D.; Black, A.; Freedman, N.D.; Huang, W.-Y.; Anema, J.G.; Kahnoski, R.J.; Lane, B.R.; Noyes, S.L.; Petillo, D.; Teh, B.T.; Peters, U.; White, E.; Anderson, G.L.; Johnson, L.; Luo, J.; Buring, J.; Lee, I.-M.; Chow, W.-H.; Moore, L.E.; Wood, C.; Eisen, T.; Henrion, M.; Larkin, J.; Barman, P.; Leibovich, B.C.; Choueiri, T.K.; Mark Lathrop, G.; Rothman, N.; Deleuze, J.-F.; McKay, J.D.; Parker, A.S.; Wu, X.; Houlston, R.S.; Brennan, P.; Chanock, S.J.
Title Genome-wide association study identifies multiple risk loci for renal cell carcinoma Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Nature Communications Abbreviated Journal Nat Commun
Volume 8 Issue Pages 15724
Keywords
Abstract Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified six risk loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We conducted a meta-analysis of two new scans of 5,198 cases and 7,331 controls together with four existing scans, totalling 10,784 cases and 20,406 controls of European ancestry. Twenty-four loci were tested in an additional 3,182 cases and 6,301 controls. We confirm the six known RCC risk loci and identify seven new loci at 1p32.3 (rs4381241, P=3.1 x 10(-10)), 3p22.1 (rs67311347, P=2.5 x 10(-8)), 3q26.2 (rs10936602, P=8.8 x 10(-9)), 8p21.3 (rs2241261, P=5.8 x 10(-9)), 10q24.33-q25.1 (rs11813268, P=3.9 x 10(-8)), 11q22.3 (rs74911261, P=2.1 x 10(-10)) and 14q24.2 (rs4903064, P=2.2 x 10(-24)). Expression quantitative trait analyses suggest plausible candidate genes at these regions that may contribute to RCC susceptibility.
Address Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28598434; PMCID:PMC5472706 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1976
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Author Selmeryd, J.; Henriksen, E.; Dalen, H.; Hedberg, P.
Title Derivation and Evaluation of Age-Specific Multivariate Reference Regions to Aid in Identification of Abnormal Filling Patterns: The HUNT and VaMIS Studies Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication JACC. Cardiovascular Imaging Abbreviated Journal JACC Cardiovasc Imaging
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Doppler; diastolic dysfunction; echocardiography; heart failure; reference values
Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to derive age-specific multivariate reference regions (MVRs) able to classify subjects into those having normal or abnormal filling patterns and to evaluate the prognostic impact of this classification. BACKGROUND: The integration of several parameters is necessary to diagnose disorders of left ventricular (LV) filling because no single measurement accurately describes the complexity of diastolic function. However, no generally accepted validated multiparametric algorithm currently exists. METHODS: A cohort of 1,240 apparently healthy subjects from HUNT (the Nord-Trondelag Health Study) with measured early (E) and late (A) mitral inflow velocity and early mitral annular diastolic tissue velocity (e') were used to derive univariate 95% reference bands and age-specific MVRs. Subsequently, the prognostic impact of this MVR-based classification was evaluated by Cox regression in a community-based cohort (n = 726) and in a cohort of subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction (n = 551). Both evaluation cohorts were derived from VaMIS (the Vastmanland Myocardial Infarction Study). RESULTS: Univariate reference bands and MVRs are presented graphically and as regression equations. After adjustment for sex, age, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes, prior ischemic heart disease, LV mass, LV ejection fraction, and left atrial size, the hazard ratio associated with abnormal filling patterns in the community-based cohort was 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.0; p < 0.001) and that in the acute myocardial infarction cohort was 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.8; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: This study derived age-specific MVRs for identification of abnormal LV filling patterns and showed, in a community-based cohort and in a cohort of patients with recent acute myocardial infarction, that these MVRs conveyed important prognostic information. An MVR-based classification of LV filling patterns could lead to more consistent diagnostic algorithms for identification of different filling disorders.
Address Department of Clinical Physiology, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden
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ISSN 1876-7591 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28734926 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1977
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Author Sen, A.; Opdahl, S.; Strand, L.B.; Vatten, L.J.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.
Title Insomnia and the Risk of Breast Cancer: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Psychosomatic Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychosom Med
Volume 79 Issue 4 Pages 461-468
Keywords
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The association of insomnia with subsequent breast cancer risk is largely unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether different symptoms of insomnia and their combination are associated with incident breast cancer in a large population-based study. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, 33,332 women were followed to monitor the occurrence of their first invasive breast cancer identified by the Cancer Registry of Norway. Insomnia symptoms including () nonrestorative sleep and () difficulty initiating and () maintaining sleep were self-reported using a study specific measure reflecting the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multiadjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: A total of 862 incident breast cancer cases occurred during a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. No consistent association was observed between the individual insomnia symptoms and breast cancer risk. However, compared to women reporting no insomnia complaints, those who reported having all three aspects of insomnia simultaneously were at increased risk (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval = 1.11-5.09). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that having only some aspects of insomnia may not predispose someone to breast cancer. In contrast, experiencing all insomnia symptoms simultaneously might confer considerable excess risk.
Address From the Department of Public Health and General Practice (Sen, Opdahl, Strand, Vatten, Laugsand, Janszky), Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Internal Medicine (Laugsand), St. Olav's hospital, Trondheim, Norway; and Department of Public Health Sciences (Janszky), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-3174 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:27763987 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1978
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Author Simic, A.; Hansen, A.F.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Midthjell, K.; Syversen, T.; Flaten, T.P.
Title Trace element status in patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway: The HUNT3 Survey Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) Abbreviated Journal J Trace Elem Med Biol
Volume 41 Issue Pages 91-98
Keywords Aged; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*blood/diagnosis/epidemiology; Female; *Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Trace Elements/*blood; Case-control study; Hunt3; Trace elements; Type 2 diabetes; Whole blood
Abstract Several epidemiological studies have indicated that a number of trace elements may play a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D). We investigated the association between prevalent T2D and the concentrations of 25 trace elements in whole blood, and the relationships between T2D duration and blood levels of the trace elements that we found to be related to T2D prevalence. In this population based case-control study, 267 patients with self-reported T2D and 609 controls (frequency matched), were selected from the third Nord-Trondelag Health Survey. Trace element blood levels were determined by high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Multivariable conditional logistic regression and multivariable linear regression were used to estimate associations. The prevalence of T2D was positively associated with boron, calcium and silver, and inversely associated with indium, lead and magnesium (Ptrend<0.05). We found no statistical evidence for associations between blood levels of arsenic, bromine, cadmium, cesium, chromium, copper, gallium, gold, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, rubidium, selenium, strontium, tantalum, thallium, tin and zinc and T2D prevalence. After corrections for multiple testing, associations remained significant for calcium and lead (Qtrend<0.05), and borderline significant for magnesium, silver and boron. With increasing disease duration, higher calcium levels were observed (P<0.05). This study suggests an association between prevalent T2D and blood levels of boron, calcium, indium, lead, magnesium and silver.
Address Department of Chemistry, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
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ISSN 0946-672X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28347468 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1979
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Author Skaaby, T.; Taylor, A.E.; Jacobsen, R.K.; Paternoster, L.; Thuesen, B.H.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Larsen, S.C.; Zhou, A.; Wong, A.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Flexeder, C.; Mannisto, S.; Hardy, R.; Kuh, D.; Barry, S.J.; Tang Mollehave, L.; Cerqueira, C.; Friedrich, N.; Bonten, T.N.; Noordam, R.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Taube, C.; Jessen, L.E.; McConnachie, A.; Sattar, N.; Upton, M.N.; McSharry, C.; Bonnelykke, K.; Bisgaard, H.; Schulz, H.; Strauch, K.; Meitinger, T.; Peters, A.; Grallert, H.; Nohr, E.A.; Kivimaki, M.; Kumari, M.; Volker, U.; Nauck, M.; Volzke, H.; Power, C.; Hypponen, E.; Hansen, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Salomaa, V.; Grarup, N.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.R.; Skorpen, F.; Kaprio, J.; R Munafo, M.; Linneberg, A.
Title Investigating the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA consortium Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2224
Keywords
Abstract Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.61, 0.76; P < 0.001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.86; P < 0.001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.09; P = 0.967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0.958, 95% CI: 0.920, 0.998; P = 0.041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.02; P = 0.117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.11; P = 0.020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.
Address Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28533558; PMCID:PMC5440386 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1980
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Author Snekvik, I.; Smith, C.H.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Langan, S.M.; Modalsli, E.H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M.
Title Obesity, Waist Circumference, Weight Change, and Risk of Incident Psoriasis: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Investigative Dermatology Abbreviated Journal J Invest Dermatol
Volume 137 Issue 12 Pages 2484-2490
Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Obesity/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Psoriasis/complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; *Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract Although psoriasis has been associated with obesity, there are few prospective studies with objective measures. We prospectively examined the effect of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, and 10-year weight change on the risk of developing psoriasis among 33,734 people in the population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (i.e., HUNT), Norway. During follow-up, 369 incident psoriasis cases occurred. Relative risk (RR) of psoriasis was estimated by Cox regression. One standard deviation higher body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio gave RRs of 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.34), 1.26 (95% CI = 1.15-1.39), and 1.18 (95% CI = 1.07-1.31), respectively. Compared with normal weight participants, obese people had an RR of 1.87 (95% CI = 1.38-2.52), whereas comparing the fourth with the first quartile of waist circumference gave an RR of 1.95 (95% CI = 1.46-2.61). One standard deviation higher weight change gave an RR of 1.20 (95% CI = 1.07-1.35), and people who increased their body weight by 10 kg or more had an RR of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.15-2.58) compared with being weight stable. In conclusion, obesity and high abdominal fat mass doubles the risk of psoriasis, and long-term weight gain substantially increases psoriasis risk. Preventing weight gain and promoting maintenance of a normal body weight could reduce incidence of psoriasis.
Address Department of Dermatology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway; Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-202X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28780086 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1988
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M.
Title Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, chronic diseases and all-cause mortality in a population-based prospective cohort: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open
Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages e017256
Keywords 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D); all-cause mortality; chronic diseases; prospective cohort study; vitamin D
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of vitamin D status with all-cause mortality in a Norwegian population and the potential influences of existing chronic diseases on the association. DESIGN: A population-based prospective cohort study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample (n=6613) of adults aged 20 years or older in a cohort. METHODS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured in blood samples collected at baseline (n=6377). Mortality was ascertained from the Norwegian National Registry. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the HRs with 95% CIs for all-cause mortality in association with serum 25(OH)D levels after adjustment for a wide spectrum of confounding factors as well as chronic diseases at baseline. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 18.5 years, during which 1539 subjects died. The HRs for all-cause mortality associated with the first quartile level of 25(OH)D (<34.5 nmol/L) as compared with the fourth quartile (>/=58.1 nmol/L) before and after adjustment for chronic diseases at baseline were 1.30 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.51) and 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), respectively. In the subjects without chronic diseases at baseline and with further exclusion of the first 3 years of follow-up, the corresponding adjusted HR was 1.34 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.66). CONCLUSIONS: Low serum 25(OH)D level was associated with increased all-cause mortality in a general Norwegian population. The association was not notably influenced by existing chronic diseases.
Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway
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ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28674149; PMCID:PMC5734252 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1990
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Author Thomsen, L.C.V.; McCarthy, N.S.; Melton, P.E.; Cadby, G.; Austgulen, R.; Nygard, O.K.; Johnson, M.P.; Brennecke, S.; Moses, E.K.; Bjorge, L.; Iversen, A.-C.
Title The antihypertensive MTHFR gene polymorphism rs17367504-G is a possible novel protective locus for preeclampsia Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal J Hypertens
Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 132-139
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Alleles; Australia; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gene Frequency; Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Hypertension/genetics; Inflammation/genetics; Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)/*genetics; Norway; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Pre-Eclampsia/*genetics; Pregnancy; Protective Factors; Young Adult
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Preeclampsia is a complex heterogeneous disease commonly defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy. Women experiencing preeclampsia have increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) later in life. Preeclampsia and CVD share risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulated inflammation and raised blood pressure. Despite commonalities, little is known about the contribution of shared genes (pleiotropy) to these diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether genetic risk factors for hypertension or inflammation are pleiotropic by also being associated with preeclampsia. METHODS: We genotyped 122 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in women with preeclampsia (n = 1006) and nonpreeclamptic controls (n = 816) from the Norwegian HUNT Study. SNPs were chosen on the basis of previously reported associations with either nongestational hypertension or inflammation in genome-wide association studies. The SNPs were tested for association with preeclampsia in a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS: The minor (G) allele of the intronic SNP rs17367504 in the gene methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was associated with a protective effect on preeclampsia (odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.80) in the Norwegian cohort. This association did not replicate in an Australian preeclampsia case-control cohort (P = 0.68, odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.32, minor allele frequency = 0.15). CONCLUSION: MTHFR is important for regulating transmethylation processes and is involved in regulation of folate metabolism. The G allele of rs17367504 has previously been shown to protect against nongestational hypertension. Our study suggests a novel association between this allele and reduced risk for preeclampsia. This is the first study associating the minor (G) allele of a SNP within the MTHFR gene with a protective effect on preeclampsia, and in doing so identifying a possible pleiotropic protective effect on preeclampsia and hypertension.
Address aDepartment of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Haukeland University Hospital bDepartment of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway cCentre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia dDepartment of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim eDepartment of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway fSouth Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Texas, USA gDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville hPregnancy Research Centre, Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria iFaculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (up) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0263-6352 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27755385; PMCID:PMC5131692 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1996
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Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O.
Title Extracellular matrix markers and risk of myocardial infarction: The HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2017