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Author Grov, E.K.; Fossa, S.D.; Dahl, A.A. url  doi
  Title (up) A controlled study of the influence of comorbidity on activities of daily living in elderly cancer survivors (the HUNT-3 survey) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Geriatric Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Geriatr Oncol  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 328-335  
  Keywords Adl; Activities of daily living; Cancer survivors; Comorbidity; Elderly; Home dwelling  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine the influence of somatic comorbidity on Activity of Daily Living (ADL) problems in cancer survivors >/=70years (ECSs) based on data from The Health Study of Nord-Trondelag County (HUNT-3) 2006-08. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Among participants of the HUNT-3 survey, 599 ECSs had a diagnosis of one invasive cancer according to both The Cancer Registry of Norway and self-report. Three controls without cancer aged >/=70years for each ECS were drawn from the HUNT-3 sample. We compared personal-ADL (P-ADL) and instrumental-ADL (I-ADL) problems for ECSs and differences between ADL problems for ECSs with and without comorbidity and controls with and without comorbidity. RESULTS: The prevalence of P-ADL problems was 3.5% among ECSs and 2.9% among controls (p=0.97) and for I-ADL 28.5% versus 21.4% (p=0.01), respectively. In bivariate analyses where ECSs versus controls was the dependent variable, presence of I-ADL problems, higher age, being female, paired relationship, poor self-rated health, hospitalization last year, and low level of neuroticism were associated being ECSs. In multivariate analyses, these variables, except I-ADL-problems and paired relationship, remained significantly associated being ECSs. No significant differences were shown for P-ADL problems when comparing ECSs and controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with and without comorbidity. ECSs with comorbidity reported significantly more I-ADL-problems than controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with comorbidity had significantly more I-ADL-problems than ECSs without comorbidity. CONCLUSION: Our results reflect common factors found in ADL studies in the elderly population. Health personnel have to be particularly observant on I-ADL problems among female ECSs, and those reporting poor self-rated health or comorbidity.  
  Address National Advisory Unit on Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1879-4068 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28629695 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1917  
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Author Halvorsen, S.; Ghanima, W.; Fride Tvete, I.; Hoxmark, C.; Falck, P.; Solli, O.; Jonasson, C. url  doi
  Title (up) A nationwide registry study to compare bleeding rates in patients with atrial fibrillation being prescribed oral anticoagulants Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Heart Journal. Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 28-36  
  Keywords Apixaban; Atrial fibrillation; Bleeding; Dabigatran; Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; Oral anticoagulants; Rivaroxaban; Warfarin  
  Abstract AIMS: We aimed to evaluate bleeding risk in clinical practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) being prescribed dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban compared with warfarin. METHODS: Using nationwide registries (Norwegian Patient Registry and Norwegian Prescription Database), we identified AF patients with a first prescription of oral anticoagulants between January 2013 and June 2015. Patients were followed until discontinuation or switching of oral anticoagulants, death, or end of follow-up. The primary endpoint was major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding. RESULTS: In total 32 675 AF patients were identified (58% men, median age 74 years): 11 427 patients used warfarin, 7925 dabigatran, 6817 rivaroxaban, and 6506 apixaban. After a median follow-up of 173 days (25th, 75th percentile 84, 340), 2081 (6.37%) patients experienced a first major or CRNM bleeding. Using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for baseline characteristics, use of apixaban [hazard ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.80, P < 0.001] and dabigatran (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.84, P < 0.001) were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin whereas use of rivaroxaban was not (HR: 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.17, P = 0.400). Use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were associated with higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas use of apixaban and dabigatran were associated with lower risk of intracranial bleeding, compared with warfarin. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort study in AF patients, apixaban and dabigatran were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with warfarin.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2055-6845 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27680880; PMCID:PMC5216196 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1920  
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Author Burgel, P.-R.; Paillasseur, J.-L.; Janssens, W.; Piquet, J.; Ter Riet, G.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Cosio, B.; Bakke, P.; Puhan, M.A.; Langhammer, A.; Alfageme, I.; Almagro, P.; Ancochea, J.; Celli, B.R.; Casanova, C.; de-Torres, J.P.; Decramer, M.; Echazarreta, A.; Esteban, C.; Gomez Punter, R.M.; Han, M.L.K.; Johannessen, A.; Kaiser, B.; Lamprecht, B.; Lange, P.; Leivseth, L.; Marin, J.M.; Martin, F.; Martinez-Camblor, P.; Miravitlles, M.; Oga, T.; Sofia Ramirez, A.; Sin, D.D.; Sobradillo, P.; Soler-Cataluna, J.J.; Turner, A.M.; Verdu Rivera, F.J.; Soriano, J.B.; Roche, N. url  doi
  Title (up) A simple algorithm for the identification of clinical COPD phenotypes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 50 Issue 5 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract This study aimed to identify simple rules for allocating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to clinical phenotypes identified by cluster analyses.Data from 2409 COPD patients of French/Belgian COPD cohorts were analysed using cluster analysis resulting in the identification of subgroups, for which clinical relevance was determined by comparing 3-year all-cause mortality. Classification and regression trees (CARTs) were used to develop an algorithm for allocating patients to these subgroups. This algorithm was tested in 3651 patients from the COPD Cohorts Collaborative International Assessment (3CIA) initiative.Cluster analysis identified five subgroups of COPD patients with different clinical characteristics (especially regarding severity of respiratory disease and the presence of cardiovascular comorbidities and diabetes). The CART-based algorithm indicated that the variables relevant for patient grouping differed markedly between patients with isolated respiratory disease (FEV1, dyspnoea grade) and those with multi-morbidity (dyspnoea grade, age, FEV1 and body mass index). Application of this algorithm to the 3CIA cohorts confirmed that it identified subgroups of patients with different clinical characteristics, mortality rates (median, from 4% to 27%) and age at death (median, from 68 to 76 years).A simple algorithm, integrating respiratory characteristics and comorbidities, allowed the identification of clinically relevant COPD phenotypes.  
  Address Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Cochin Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France  
  Corporate Author Initiatives BPCO, EABPCO, Leuven and 3CIA study groups Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29097431 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1894  
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Author Hjerkind, K.V.; Stenehjem, J.S.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title (up) Adiposity, physical activity and risk of diabetes mellitus: prospective data from the population-based HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e013142  
  Keywords *Adiposity; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Body Mass Index; Comorbidity; Diabetes Mellitus/*epidemiology; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Young Adult; *Epidemiology; *Public Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Physical activity may counteract the adverse effects of adiposity on cardiovascular mortality; however, the evidence of a similar effect on diabetes is sparse. This study examines whether physical activity may compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk. METHODS: The study population consisted of 38 231 individuals aged 20 years or more who participated in two consecutive waves of the prospective longitudinal Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway: in 1984-1986 and in 1995-1997. A Poisson regression model with SEs derived from robust variance was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios of diabetes between categories of body mass index and physical activity. RESULTS: Risk of diabetes increased both with increasing body mass (Ptrend <0.001) and with decreasing physical activity level (Ptrend <0.001 in men and 0.01 in women). Combined analyses showed that men who were both obese and had low activity levels had a risk ratio of 17 (95% CI 9.52 to 30) compared to men who were normal weight and highly active, whereas obese men who reported high activity had a risk ratio of 13 (95% CI 6.92 to 26). Corresponding analysis in obese women produced risk ratios of 15 (95% CI 9.18 to 25) and 13 (95% CI 7.42 to 21) among women reporting low and high activity levels, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that overweight and obesity are associated with a substantially increased risk of diabetes, particularly among those who also reported being physically inactive. High levels of physical activity were associated with a lower risk of diabetes within all categories of body mass index, but there was no clear evidence that being physically active could entirely compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk.  
  Address Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28093432; PMCID:PMC5253523 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1929  
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Author Junker, A.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Bjerkeset, O. url  doi
  Title (up) Adolescent health and subsequent risk of self-harm hospitalisation: a 15-year follow-up of the Young-HUNT cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health Abbreviated Journal Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 25  
  Keywords Adolescence; Hospitalisation; Self-harm  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Self-harm is associated with increased suicide risk, and constitutes a major challenge in adolescent mental healthcare. In the current study, we examined the association between different aspects of adolescent health and risk of later self-harm requiring hospital admission. METHODS: We linked baseline information from 13 to 19 year old participants (n = 8965) in the Norwegian Young-HUNT 1 study to patient records of self-harm hospitalisation during 15 years of follow-up. We used Cox regression to estimate risk factor hazard ratios (HR). RESULTS: Eighty-nine persons (71% female) were admitted to hospital because of self-harm. Intoxication/self-poisoning was the most frequent method (81%). Both mental (anxiety/depression, loneliness, being bullied) and somatic (epilepsy, migraine) health issues were associated with up to fourfold increased risk of self-harm-related hospital admission. CONCLUSIONS: Several health issues during adolescence markedly increased the risk of later self-harm hospitalisation. Current findings should be incorporated in the strive to reduce self-harming and attempted suicides among young people.  
  Address Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord University, Levanger, Norway.grid.465487.c  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1753-2000 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28469702; PMCID:PMC5410696 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1936  
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Author Evensen, M.; Lyngstad, T.H.; Melkevik, O.; Reneflot, A.; Mykletun, A. url  doi
  Title (up) Adolescent mental health and earnings inequalities in adulthood: evidence from the Young-HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 71 Issue 2 Pages 201-206  
  Keywords Employment; Inequalities; Longitudinal Studies; Mental Health; Social and life-course epidemiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that adolescent mental health problems are associated with lower employment probabilities and risk of unemployment. The evidence on how earnings are affected is much weaker, and few have addressed whether any association reflects unobserved characteristics and whether the consequences of mental health problems vary across the earnings distribution. METHODS: A population-based Norwegian health survey linked to administrative registry data (N=7885) was used to estimate how adolescents' mental health problems (separate indicators of internalising, conduct, and attention problems and total sum scores) affect earnings (>/=30 years) in young adulthood. We used linear regression with fixed-effects models comparing either students within schools or siblings within families. Unconditional quantile regressions were used to explore differentials across the earnings distribution. RESULTS: Mental health problems in adolescence reduce average earnings in adulthood, and associations are robust to control for observed family background and school fixed effects. For some, but not all mental health problems, associations are also robust in sibling fixed-effects models, where all stable family factors are controlled. Further, we found much larger earnings loss below the 25th centile. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent mental health problems reduce adult earnings, especially among individuals in the lower tail of the earnings distribution. Preventing mental health problems in adolescence may increase future earnings.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27531845 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1905  
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Nordsletten, L.; Johnsen, M.B.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title (up) Age of menarche is associated with knee joint replacement due to primary osteoarthritis (The HUNT Study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume 25 Issue 10 Pages 1654-1662  
  Keywords Hip joint replacement; Hormonal therapies; Knee joint replacement; Osteoarthritis; Reproductive history  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether parity, age at menarche, menopausal status, age at menopause, use of oral contraceptives (OC) or use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were associated with total knee replacement (TKR) or total hip replacement (THR) due to primary osteoarthritis. METHOD: In a prospective cohort study of 30,289 women from the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, data were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR) in order to identify TKR or THR due to primary osteoarthritis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: We observed 430 TKRs and 675 THRs during a mean follow-up time of 8.3 years. Increasing age at menarche was inversely associated with the risk of TKR (P-trend < 0.001). Past users and users of systemic HRT were at higher risk of TKR compared to never users (HR 1.42 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.90) and HR 1.40 (95% CI 1.03-1.90), respectively). No association was found between parity, age at menarche, menopausal status, age at menopause, oral contraceptive use or HRT use and THR. CONCLUSION: We found that increasing age at menarche reduced the risk of TKR. Past users and users of systemic HRT were at higher risk of TKR compared to never users. Parity did not increase the risk of THR or TKR.  
  Address The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28705605 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1925  
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Author Felde, G.; Ebbesen, M.H.; Hunskaar, S. url  doi
  Title (up) Anxiety and depression associated with urinary incontinence. A 10-year follow-up study from the Norwegian HUNT study (EPINCONT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neurourology and Urodynamics Abbreviated Journal Neurourol Urodyn  
  Volume 36 Issue 2 Pages 322-328  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*epidemiology/etiology/psychology; Depression/*epidemiology/etiology/psychology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Middle Aged; Norway; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Urinary Incontinence/*complications/psychology; Young Adult; Epincont; Hads; Hunt; anxiety; depression; epidemiology; urinary incontinence  
  Abstract AIMS: Firstly, to investigate the association between depression, anxiety and urinary incontinence (UI) in a 10-year longitudinal study of women. Secondly, to investigate the association between possible differences in the stress- and urgency components of UI and different severities of depression and anxiety by age groups. METHODS: In a longitudinal, population-based survey study, the EPINCONT part of the HUNT study in Norway, we analyzed questionnaire data on UI, depression and anxiety from 16,263 women from 20 years of age. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to predict the odds of developing anxiety and depression among the women with and without UI at baseline and the odds of developing UI among the women with and without anxiety or depression at baseline. RESULTS: For women with any UI at baseline we found an association with the incidence of depression and anxiety symptoms, OR 1.45 (1.23-1.72) and 1.26 (1.8-1.47) for mild depression and anxiety respectively. For women with depression or anxiety symptoms at baseline we found an association with the incidence of any UI with OR 2.09 (1.55-2.83) and 1.65 (1.34-2.03) for moderate/severe symptom-score for depression and anxiety, respectively, for the whole sample. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, both depression and anxiety are shown to be risk factors for developing UI with a dose-dependent trend. UI is associated with increased incidence of depression and anxiety. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:322-328, 2017. (c) 2015 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.  
  Address National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-2467 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26584597 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1902  
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Author Bjornland, T.; Langaas, M.; Grill, V.; Mostad, I.L. url  doi
  Title (up) Assessing gene-environment interaction effects of FTO, MC4R and lifestyle factors on obesity using an extreme phenotype sampling design: Results from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175071  
  Keywords Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; *Gene-Environment Interaction; Humans; *Life Style; Obesity/*genetics; *Phenotype; Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4/*genetics; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess the influence of age, gender and lifestyle factors on the effect of the obesity-promoting alleles of FTO and MCR4. METHODS: The HUNT study comprises health information on the population of Nord-Trondelag county, Norway. Extreme phenotype participants (gender-wise lower and upper quartiles of waist-hip-ratio and BMI >/= 35 kg/m2) in the third survey, HUNT3 (2006-08), were genotyped for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609 (FTO) and rs17782313 (MC4R); 25686 participants were successfully genotyped. Extreme sampling was chosen to increase power to detect genetic and gene-environment effects on waist-hip-ratio and BMI. Statistical inference was based on linear regression models and a missing-covariate likelihood approach for the extreme phenotype sampling design. Environmental factors were physical activity, diet (artificially sweetened beverages) and smoking. Longitudinal analysis was performed using material from HUNT2 (1995-97). RESULTS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal genetic effects indicated stronger genetic associations with obesity in young than in old, as well as differences between women and men. We observed larger genetic effects among physically inactive compared to active individuals. This interaction was age-dependent and seen mainly in 20-40 year olds. We observed a greater FTO effect among men with a regular intake of artificially sweetened beverages, compared to non-drinkers. Interaction analysis of smoking was mainly inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: In a large all-adult and area-based population survey the effects of obesity-promoting minor-alleles of FTO and MCR4, and interactions with life style factors are age- and gender-related. These findings appear relevant when designing individualized treatment for and prophylaxis against obesity.  
  Address Department of Clinical Nutrition and Speech-Language Therapy, Clinic of Clinical Services, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28384342; PMCID:PMC5383228 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1884  
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Author Gabin, J.M.; Tambs, K.; Saltvedt, I.; Sund, E.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title (up) Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Abbreviated Journal Alzheimers Res Ther  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 37  
  Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Asymptomatic Diseases/*epidemiology; Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data; Comorbidity; Dementia/diagnosis/epidemiology; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*diagnostic imaging/*epidemiology; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sex Distribution; Alzheimer disease; Blood pressure; Epidemiology; Prospective case cohort; Risk factors; Vascular dementia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. METHODS: In Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. RESULTS: Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in individuals over the age of 60 years. We cannot exclude a survival effect, however. Among middle-aged subjects (<60 years), elevated systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were associated with eventual Alzheimer disease in individuals who reported using antihypertensive medication.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1758-9193 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28569205; PMCID:PMC5452294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1900  
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Author Osthus, I.B.O.; Lydersen, S.; Dalen, H.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title (up) Association of Telomere Length With Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort From the Population Based HUNT 2 Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis  
  Volume 59 Issue 6 Pages 649-655  
  Keywords Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Genetic Markers; Humans; Incidence; Linear Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis/epidemiology/*genetics; Norway/epidemiology; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Telomere/*genetics; *Telomere Homeostasis; Time Factors; Cardiovascular diseases; Myocardial infarction; Prevention; Risk factors; Telomeres  
  Abstract As possible markers of biological age, telomere length (TL) has been associated with age-related diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI) with conflicting findings. We sought to assess the relationship between TL and risk of future MI in 915 healthy participants (51.7% women) 65 years or older from a population-based prospective cohort (the HUNT 2 study, Norway). Mean TL was measured by quantitative PCR expressed as relative T (telomere repeat copy number) to S (single copy gene number) ratio, and log-transformed. During a mean follow up of 13.0 (SD, 3.2) years and 11,923 person-years, 82 participants were diagnosed with MI. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Relative TL was associated with age in women (P=0.01), but not in men (P=0.43). Using relative TL as a continuous variable, we observed a higher risk of MI in participants with longer telomeres with HRs of 2.46 (95% CI; 1.13 to 4.54) in men, and 2.93 (95% CI; 1.41 to 6.10) in women. Each 1-SD change in relative TL was associated with an HR of 1.54 (95% CI; 1.15 to 2.06) and 1.67 (95% CI; 1.18 to 2.37) in men and women, respectively. Compared with the bottom tertile of relative TL, HR of incident MI in top tertile was 2.71 (95% CI; 1.25 to 5.89) in men, and 3.65 (95% CI; 1.35 to 9.90) in women. Longer telomeres in healthy participants 65 years or older are associated with a high risk of incident MI. Future large scale prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore the potential association between TL and MI.  
  Address K. G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-0620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28442329 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1968  
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Author Paulsen, J.; Askim, A.; Mohus, R.M.; Mehl, A.; Dewan, A.; Solligard, E.; Damas, J.K.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title (up) Associations of obesity and lifestyle with the risk and mortality of bloodstream infection in a general population: a 15-year follow-up of 64 027 individuals in the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 1573-1581  
  Keywords Bacteraemia; alcohol drinking; exercise; obesity; sepsis; smoking  
  Abstract Background: Bloodstream infections (BSI) cause considerable morbidity and mortality, and primary prevention should be a priority. Lifestyle factors are of particular interest since they represent a modifiable target. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study among participants in the population-based Norwegian HUNT2 Survey, where 64 027 participants were followed from 1995-97 through 2011 by linkage to prospectively recorded information on BSI at local and regional hospitals. The exposures were: baseline body mass index (BMI) measurements; and self-reported smoking habits, leisure time physical activity and alcohol intake. The outcomes were hazard ratios (HR) of BSI and BSI mortality. Results: During 810 453 person-years and median follow-up of 14.8 years, 1844 (2.9%) participants experienced at least one BSI and 396 (0.62%) died from BSI. Compared with normal weight participants (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), the age- and sex-adjusted risk of a first-time BSI was 31% [95% confidence interval (CI) 14-51%] higher at BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m2, 87% (95% CI 50-135%) higher at BMI 35.0-39.9 kg/m2 and 210% (95% CI 117-341%) higher at BMI >/= 40.0 kg/m2. The risk of BSI mortality was similarly increased. Compared with never-smokers, current smokers had 51% (95% CI 34-70%) and 75% (95% CI 34-129%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively. Physically inactive participants had 71% (95% CI 42-107%) and 108% (95% CI 37-216%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively, compared with the most physically active. Conclusions: Obesity, smoking and physical inactivity carry increased risk of BSI and BSI mortality.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28637260 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1969  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Wu, C.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title (up) Associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level with incidence of lung cancer and histologic types in Norwegian adults: a case-cohort analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Case-cohort study; Histologic types; Lung cancer; Pulmonary adenocarcinoma; Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; Vitamin D  
  Abstract Previous prospective studies have shown inconsistent associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and lung cancer incidence. The aim of the present study was to explore the associations of serum 25(OH)D levels with incidence of lung cancer overall and different histologic types. We performed a population-based prospective case-cohort study including 696 incident lung cancer cases and 5804 individuals in a subcohort who participated in the second survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway. Cox proportional hazards regression models counting for the case-cohort design were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) for lung cancer overall or histologic types in relation to serum 25(OH)D levels. Compared with the fourth season-specific quartile of 25(OH)D (median 68.0 nmol/L), lower 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the incidence of overall, small or squamous cell lung cancer. However, the risk of adenocarcinoma was lower in the second and third quartiles (median 39.9 and 51.5 nmol/L) compared with the fourth quartile, with HRs of 0.63 (95% CI 0.41-0.98) and 0.58 (0.38-0.88), respectively. The associations of lower levels of 25(OH)D with a reduced risk of adenocarcinoma were only observed in the overweight/obese subjects [HRs for second and third quartiles: 0.40 (0.22-0.72) and 0.50 (0.27-0.92)] but not in the normal weight subjects [HRs: 0.95 (0.52-1.75) and 0.60 (0.32-1.10)]. Serum 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the risk of lung cancer in general. The observation that lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with a lower risk of adenocarcinoma should be interpreted with caution.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29080012 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2007  
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Author Gulati, A.M.; Hoff, M.; Salvesen, O.; Dhainaut, A.; Semb, A.G.; Kavanaugh, A.; Haugeberg, G. url  doi
  Title (up) Bone mineral density in patients with psoriatic arthritis: data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication RMD Open Abbreviated Journal RMD Open  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages e000413  
  Keywords Psoriatic arthritis; bone mineral density; osteoporosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The risk of osteoporosis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in patients with PsA and controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with PsA and controls were recruited from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) 3. RESULTS: Patients with PsA (n=69) and controls (n=11 703) were comparable in terms of age (56.8 vs 55.3 years, p=0.32), gender distribution (females 65.2% vs 64.3%, p=0.87) and postmenopausal status (75.6% vs 62.8%, p=0.08). Body mass index (BMI) was higher in patients with PsA compared with controls (28.5 vs 27.2 kg/m(2), p=0.01). After adjusting for potential confounding factors (including BMI), BMD was higher in patients with PsA compared with controls at lumbar spine 1-4 (1.213 vs 1.147 g/cm(2), p=0.003) and femoral neck (0.960 vs 0.926 g/cm(2), p=0.02), but not at total hip (1.013 vs 0.982 g/cm(2), p=0.11). Controls had significantly higher odds of having osteopenia or osteoporosis based on measurements of BMD in both the femoral neck (p=0.001), total hip (p=0.033) and lumbar spine (p=0.033). CONCLUSION: Our population-based data showed comparable BMD in patients with PsA and controls. This supports that the PsA population is not at increased risk of osteoporosis.  
  Address Department of Rheumatology, Martina Hansens Hospital, Brum, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2056-5933 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28955483; PMCID:PMC5604602 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1919  
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Author Quanjer, P.H.; Ruppel, G.L.; Langhammer, A.; Krishna, A.; Mertens, F.; Johannessen, A.; Menezes, A.M.B.; Wehrmeister, F.C.; Perez-Padilla, R.; Swanney, M.P.; Tan, W.C.; Bourbeau, J. url  doi
  Title (up) Bronchodilator Response in FVC Is Larger and More Relevant Than in FEV1 in Severe Airflow Obstruction Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Chest Abbreviated Journal Chest  
  Volume 151 Issue 5 Pages 1088-1098  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Airway Obstruction/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Asthma/*diagnosis/physiopathology; *Bronchodilator Agents; Canada; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/*physiology; Healthy Volunteers; Humans; Latin America; Male; Middle Aged; Netherlands; New Zealand; Norway; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Treatment Outcome; United States; Vital Capacity/*physiology; Young Adult; airways obstruction; asthma; bronchodilator responsiveness; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; respiratory physiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Recommendations on interpreting tests of bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) are conflicting. We investigated the dependence of BDR criteria on sex, age, height, ethnicity, and severity of respiratory impairment. METHODS: BDR test data were available from clinical patients in the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United States (n = 15,278; female subjects, 51.7%) and from surveys in Canada, Norway, and five Latin-American countries (n = 16,250; female subjects, 54.7%). BDR calculated according to FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC was expressed as absolute change, a percentage of the baseline level (% baseline), a percentage of the predicted value (% predicted), and z score. RESULTS: Change (Delta) in FEV1 and FVC, in milliliters, was unrelated to the baseline value but was biased toward age, height, sex, and level of airways obstruction; DeltaFEV1 was significantly lower in African Americans. In 1,106 subjects with low FEV1 (200-1,621 mL) the FEV1 increased by 12% to 44.7% relative to baseline but < 200 mL. Expressing BDR as a percentage of the predicted value or as a z score attenuated the bias and made the 200-mL criterion redundant, but reduced positive responses by half. DeltaFEV1 % baseline increased with the level of airflow obstruction but decreased with severe obstruction when expressed as z scores or % predicted; DeltaFVC, however expressed, increased with the level of airflow obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Expressing FEV1 responsiveness as % baseline spuriously suggests that responsiveness increases with the severity of respiratory impairment. Expressing change in FEV1 or FVC as % predicted or as z scores eliminates this artifact and renders the required 200-mL minimum increase redundant. In severe airways obstruction DeltaFVC should be critically evaluated as an index of clinically important relief of hyperinflation, with implications for bronchodilator drug trials.  
  Address Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-3692 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28040521 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1971  
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Author Daneshvar, F.; Weinreich, M.; Daneshvar, D.; Sperling, M.; Salmane, C.; Yacoub, H.; Gabriels, J.; McGinn, T.; Smith, M.C. url  doi
  Title (up) Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Internal Medicine Residents: Are Future Physicians Becoming Deconditioned? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Graduate Medical Education Abbreviated Journal J Grad Med Educ  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 97-101  
  Keywords *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cross-Sectional Studies; Education, Medical, Graduate; Exercise/*psychology; Female; Habits; Humans; Internal Medicine/*education; *Internship and Residency; Male; New York; Surveys and Questionnaires; Time Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND : Previous studies have shown a falloff in physicians' physical activity from medical school to residency. Poor fitness may result in stress, increase resident burnout, and contribute to mortality from cardiovascular disease and other causes. Physicians with poor exercise habits are also less likely to counsel patients about exercise. Prior studies have reported resident physical activity but not cardiorespiratory fitness age. OBJECTIVE : The study was conducted in 2 residency programs (3 hospitals) to assess internal medicine residents' exercise habits as well as their cardiorespiratory fitness age. METHODS : Data regarding physical fitness levels and exercise habits were collected in an anonymous cross-sectional survey. Cardiopulmonary fitness age was determined using fitness calculator based on the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). RESULTS : Of 199 eligible physicians, 125 (63%) responded to the survey. Of respondents, 11 (9%) reported never having exercised prior to residency and 45 (36%) reported not exercising during residency (P < .001). In addition, 42 (34%) reported exercising every day prior to residency, while only 5 (4%) reported exercising daily during residency (P < .001), with 99 (79%) participants indicating residency obligations as their main barrier to exercise. We found residents' calculated mean fitness age to be 5.6 years higher than their mean chronological age (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS : Internal medicine residents reported significant decreases in physical activity and fitness. Residents attributed time constraints due to training as a key barrier to physical activity.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1949-8357 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28261402; PMCID:PMC5330203 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1904  
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Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Vie, G.A.; Krokstad, S.; Janszky, I.; Romundstad, P.R.; Vatten, L.J. url  doi
  Title (up) Cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 232 Issue Pages 127-133  
  Keywords Cardiovascular mortality; Confounding; Couples; Population study; Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To compare associations of conventional risk factors with cardiovascular death within couples and in the population as a whole. METHODS: We analysed baseline data (1995-97) from the HUNT2 Study in Norway linked to the national Causes of Death Registry. We compared risk within couples using stratified Cox regression. RESULTS: During 914776 person-years, 3964 cardiovascular deaths occurred, and 1658 of the deaths occurred among 1494 couples. There were consistently stronger associations of serum lipids and blood pressure with cardiovascular mortality within couples compared to the population as a whole. For instance, for systolic blood pressure (per 20mmHg), the hazard ratio (HR) within couples was 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.40) compared to 1.16 (1.12, 1.20) in the total population, and for diastolic pressure (per 10mmHg), the corresponding HRs were 1.16 (1.07, 1.26) and 1.11 (1.08, 1.13). Anthropometric factors (BMI, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio) as well as diabetes, smoking, physical activity, and education, showed nearly identical positive associations within couples and in the total population. CONCLUSIONS: Prospective population studies may tend to slightly underestimate associations of these factors with cardiovascular mortality.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway; Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28082089 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1883  
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Author Safiri, S.; Ayubi, E. url  doi
  Title (up) Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT study Type Comment
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 242 Issue Pages 7  
  Keywords *Cardiovascular Diseases; Humans; Norway; Risk Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: aubi65@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28619353 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1974  
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Author Carslake, D.; Davey Smith, G.; Gunnell, D.; Davies, N.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P. url  doi
  Title (up) Confounding by ill health in the observed association between BMI and mortality: evidence from the HUNT Study using offspring BMI as an instrument Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Body mass index; cohort study; confounding; instrumental variables; mortality; reverse causation  
  Abstract Background: The observational association between mortality and body mass index (BMI) is U-shaped, leading to highly publicized suggestions that moderate overweight is beneficial to health. However, it is unclear whether elevated mortality is caused by low BMI or if the association is confounded, for example by concurrent ill health. Methods: Using HUNT, a Norwegian prospective study, 32 452 mother-offspring and 27 747 father-offspring pairs were followed up to 2009. Conventional hazard ratios for parental mortality per standard deviation of BMI were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for behavioural and socioeconomic factors. To estimate hazard ratios with reduced susceptibility to confounding, particularly from concurrent ill health, the BMI of parents' offspring was used as an instrumental variable for parents' own BMI. The shape of mortality-BMI associations was assessed using cubic splines. Results: There were 18 365 parental deaths during follow-up. Conventional associations of mortality from all-causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer with parents' own BMI were substantially nonlinear, with elevated mortality at both extremes and minima at 21-25 kg m-2. Equivalent associations with offspring BMI were positive and there was no evidence of elevated parental mortality at low offspring BMI. The linear instrumental variable hazard ratio for all-cause mortality per standard deviation increase in BMI was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.26), compared with 1.05 (1.03, 1.06) in the conventional analysis. Conclusions: Elevated mortality rates at high BMI appear causal, whereas excess mortality at low BMI is likely exaggerated by confounding by factors including concurrent ill health. Conventional studies probably underestimate the adverse population health consequences of overweight.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29206928 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1896  
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Nordsletten, L.; Johnsen, M.B.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title (up) Corrigendum to “Age of menarche is associated with knee joint replacement due to primary osteoarthritis (The HUNT Study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register)” [Osteoarthr Cartil 25 (2017) 1654-1662] Type Published Erratum
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 2148-2149  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29066295 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1926  
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Author Zijlema, W.; Cai, Y.; Doiron, D.; Mbatchou, S.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; de Hoogh, K.; Morley, D.; Hodgson, S.; Elliott, P.; Key, T.; Kongsgard, H.; Hveem, K.; Gaye, A.; Burton, P.; Hansell, A.; Stolk, R.; Rosmalen, J. url  doi
  Title (up) Corrigendum to “Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses of harmonized data from 88,336 participants” [Environ. Res. 151 (2016) 804-813] Type Published Erratum
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 152 Issue Pages 520  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27823774 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2027  
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Author Selmeryd, J.; Henriksen, E.; Dalen, H.; Hedberg, P. url  doi
  Title (up) Derivation and Evaluation of Age-Specific Multivariate Reference Regions to Aid in Identification of Abnormal Filling Patterns: The HUNT and VaMIS Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication JACC. Cardiovascular Imaging Abbreviated Journal JACC Cardiovasc Imaging  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Doppler; diastolic dysfunction; echocardiography; heart failure; reference values  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to derive age-specific multivariate reference regions (MVRs) able to classify subjects into those having normal or abnormal filling patterns and to evaluate the prognostic impact of this classification. BACKGROUND: The integration of several parameters is necessary to diagnose disorders of left ventricular (LV) filling because no single measurement accurately describes the complexity of diastolic function. However, no generally accepted validated multiparametric algorithm currently exists. METHODS: A cohort of 1,240 apparently healthy subjects from HUNT (the Nord-Trondelag Health Study) with measured early (E) and late (A) mitral inflow velocity and early mitral annular diastolic tissue velocity (e') were used to derive univariate 95% reference bands and age-specific MVRs. Subsequently, the prognostic impact of this MVR-based classification was evaluated by Cox regression in a community-based cohort (n = 726) and in a cohort of subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction (n = 551). Both evaluation cohorts were derived from VaMIS (the Vastmanland Myocardial Infarction Study). RESULTS: Univariate reference bands and MVRs are presented graphically and as regression equations. After adjustment for sex, age, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes, prior ischemic heart disease, LV mass, LV ejection fraction, and left atrial size, the hazard ratio associated with abnormal filling patterns in the community-based cohort was 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.0; p < 0.001) and that in the acute myocardial infarction cohort was 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.8; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: This study derived age-specific MVRs for identification of abnormal LV filling patterns and showed, in a community-based cohort and in a cohort of patients with recent acute myocardial infarction, that these MVRs conveyed important prognostic information. An MVR-based classification of LV filling patterns could lead to more consistent diagnostic algorithms for identification of different filling disorders.  
  Address Department of Clinical Physiology, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1876-7591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28734926 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1977  
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Author Gemes, K.; Malmo, V.; Laugsand, L.E.; Loennechen, J.P.; Ellekjaer, H.; Laszlo, K.D.; Ahnve, S.; Vatten, L.J.; Mukamal, K.J.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title (up) Does Moderate Drinking Increase the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation? The Norwegian HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health) Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of the American Heart Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Heart Assoc  
  Volume 6 Issue 10 Pages  
  Keywords Hunt; alcohol; atrial fibrillation; cohort study; epidemiology; moderate alcohol  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Compelling evidence suggests that excessive alcohol consumption increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the effect of light-moderate alcohol consumption is less certain. We investigated the association between alcohol consumption within recommended limits and AF risk in a light-drinking population. METHODS AND RESULTS: Among 47 002 participants with information on alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort study in Norway, conducted from October 2006 to June 2008, 1697 validated AF diagnoses were registered during the 8 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazard models with fractional polynomials to analyze the association between alcohol intake and AF. Population attributable risk for drinking within the recommended limit (ie, at most 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men without risky drinking) compared with nondrinking was also calculated. The average alcohol intake was 3.8+/-4.8 g/d. The adjusted hazard ratio for AF was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.80) when we compared participants consuming >7 drinks per week with abstainers. When we modeled the quantity of alcohol intake as a continuous variable, the risk increased in a curvilinear manner. It was higher with heavier alcohol intake, but there was virtually no association at <1 drink per day for women and <2 drinks per day for men in the absence of risky drinking. The population attributable risk among nonrisky drinkers was 0.07% (95% confidence interval, -0.01% to 0.13%). CONCLUSIONS: Although alcohol consumption was associated with a curvilinearly increasing risk of AF in general, the attributable risk of alcohol consumption within recommended limits among participants without binge or problem drinking was negligible in this population.  
  Address Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-9980 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29054845; PMCID:PMC5721892 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1901  
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Author Perreault, K.; Bauman, A.; Johnson, N.; Britton, A.; Rangul, V.; Stamatakis, E. url  doi
  Title (up) Does physical activity moderate the association between alcohol drinking and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular diseases mortality? A pooled analysis of eight British population cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication British Journal of Sports Medicine Abbreviated Journal Br J Sports Med  
  Volume 51 Issue 8 Pages 651-657  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*adverse effects; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; England; *Exercise; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality; Neoplasms/*mortality; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Cancer; Epidemiology; Physical activity; Public health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine whether physical activity (PA) moderates the association between alcohol intake and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mortality. DESIGN: Prospective study using 8 British population-based surveys, each linked to cause-specific mortality: Health Survey for England (1994, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004 and 2006) and Scottish Health Survey (1998 and 2003). PARTICIPANTS: 36 370 men and women aged 40 years and over were included with a corresponding 5735 deaths and a mean of 353 049 person-years of follow-up. EXPOSURES: 6 sex-specific categories of alcohol intake (UK units/week) were defined: (1) never drunk; (2) ex-drinkers; (3) occasional drinkers; (4) within guidelines (<14 (women); <21 (men)); (5) hazardous (14-35 (women); 21-49 (men)) and (6) harmful (>35 (women) >49 (men)). PA was categorised as inactive (</=7 MET-hour/week), active at the lower (>7.5 MET-hour/week) and upper (>15 MET-hour/week) of recommended levels. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cox proportional-hazard models were used to examine associations between alcohol consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality risk after adjusting for several confounders. Stratified analyses were performed to evaluate mortality risks within each PA stratum. RESULTS: We found a direct association between alcohol consumption and cancer mortality risk starting from drinking within guidelines (HR (95% CI) hazardous drinking: 1.40 (1.11 to 1.78)). Stratified analyses showed that the association between alcohol intake and mortality risk was attenuated (all-cause) or nearly nullified (cancer) among individuals who met the PA recommendations (HR (95% CI)). CONCLUSIONS: Meeting the current PA public health recommendations offsets some of the cancer and all-cause mortality risk associated with alcohol drinking.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title