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Author Krokstad, S.; Ding, D.; Grunseit, A.C.; Sund, E.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title (up) Multiple lifestyle behaviours and mortality, findings from a large population-based Norwegian cohort study – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 58  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology; Cohort Studies; Diet/adverse effects; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; *Risk-Taking; Sleep; Smoking/adverse effects; Social Behavior; Young Adult; *All-cause mortality; *Cardiovascular disease; *Cohort study; *Lifestyle behaviour; *Metabolic disease; *Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lifestyle risk behaviours are responsible for a large proportion of disease burden and premature mortality worldwide. Risk behaviours tend to cluster in populations. We developed a new lifestyle risk index by including emerging risk factors (sleep, sitting time, and social participation) and examine unique risk combinations and their associations with all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality. METHODS: Data are from a large population-based cohort study in a Norway, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), with an average follow-up time of 14.1 years. Baseline data from 1995-97 were linked to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry. The analytic sample comprised 36 911 adults aged 20-69 years. Cox regression models were first fitted for seven risk factors (poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, current smoking, physical inactivity, excessive sitting, too much/too little sleep, and poor social participation) separately and then adjusted for socio-demographic covariates. Based on these results, a lifestyle risk index was developed. Finally, we explored common combinations of the risk factors in relation to all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality outcomes. RESULTS: All single risk factors, except for diet, were significantly associated with both mortality outcomes, and were therefore selected to form a lifestyle risk index. Risk of mortality increased as the index score increased. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality increased from 1.37 (1.15-1.62) to 6.15 (3.56-10.63) as the number of index risk factors increased from one to six respectively. Among the most common risk factor combinations the association with mortality was particularly strong when smoking and/or social participation were included. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to previous research on multiple risk behaviours by incorporating emerging risk factors. Findings regarding social participation and prolonged sitting suggest new components of healthy lifestyles and potential new directions for population health interventions.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28068991; PMCID:PMC5223537 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1946  
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Author Snekvik, I.; Smith, C.H.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Langan, S.M.; Modalsli, E.H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title (up) Obesity, Waist Circumference, Weight Change, and Risk of Incident Psoriasis: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Investigative Dermatology Abbreviated Journal J Invest Dermatol  
  Volume 137 Issue 12 Pages 2484-2490  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Obesity/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Psoriasis/complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; *Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Although psoriasis has been associated with obesity, there are few prospective studies with objective measures. We prospectively examined the effect of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, and 10-year weight change on the risk of developing psoriasis among 33,734 people in the population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (i.e., HUNT), Norway. During follow-up, 369 incident psoriasis cases occurred. Relative risk (RR) of psoriasis was estimated by Cox regression. One standard deviation higher body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio gave RRs of 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.34), 1.26 (95% CI = 1.15-1.39), and 1.18 (95% CI = 1.07-1.31), respectively. Compared with normal weight participants, obese people had an RR of 1.87 (95% CI = 1.38-2.52), whereas comparing the fourth with the first quartile of waist circumference gave an RR of 1.95 (95% CI = 1.46-2.61). One standard deviation higher weight change gave an RR of 1.20 (95% CI = 1.07-1.35), and people who increased their body weight by 10 kg or more had an RR of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.15-2.58) compared with being weight stable. In conclusion, obesity and high abdominal fat mass doubles the risk of psoriasis, and long-term weight gain substantially increases psoriasis risk. Preventing weight gain and promoting maintenance of a normal body weight could reduce incidence of psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Dermatology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway; Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-202X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28780086 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1988  
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Author Lie, A.; Engdahl, B.; Hoffman, H.J.; Li, C.-M.; Tambs, K. url  doi
  Title (up) Occupational noise exposure, hearing loss, and notched audiograms in the HUNT Nord-Trondelag hearing loss study, 1996-1998 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Laryngoscope Abbreviated Journal Laryngoscope  
  Volume 127 Issue 6 Pages 1442-1450  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Audiometry/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced/*epidemiology/etiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Noise, Occupational/*adverse effects; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology; Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects; Prevalence; Sex Distribution; Young Adult; Noise; noise-induced hearing loss; notched audiograms; occupation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To study the prevalence and usefulness of audiometric notches in the diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). STUDY DESIGN: Audiograms and data on noise exposure from 23,297 men and 26,477 women, aged 20 to 101 years, from the Nord-Trondelag Hearing Loss Study, 1996-1998. METHODS: The prevalence of four types of audiometric notches (Coles, Hoffman, Wilson) and 4 kHz notch were computed in relation to occupational noise exposure, age, sex, and report of recurrent ear infections. RESULTS: The prevalence of notches in the 3 to 6 kHz range (Wilson, Hoffman, and Coles) ranged from 50% to 60% in subjects without occupational noise exposure, and 60% to 70% in the most occupationally noise-exposed men. The differences were statistically significant only for bilateral notches. For 4 kHz notches, the prevalence varied from 25% in occupationally nonexposed to 35% in the most occupationally exposed men, and the differences were statistically significant for both bilateral and unilateral notches. For women, the prevalence of notches was lower than in men, especially for 4 kHz notches, and the differences between occupationally noise exposed and nonexposed were smaller. Recreational exposure to high music was not associated with notched audiograms. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of bilateral notches and unilateral 4 kHz notches is of some value in diagnosing NIHL, especially in men. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1442-1450, 2017.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0023-852X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696439; PMCID:PMC5484347 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1948  
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Author Hansen, A.G.; Stovner, L.J.; Hagen, K.; Helvik, A.-S.; Thorstensen, W.M.; Nordgard, S.; Bugten, V.; Eggesbo, H.B. url  doi
  Title (up) Paranasal sinus opacification in headache sufferers: A population-based imaging study (the HUNT study-MRI) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cephalalgia : an International Journal of Headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 509-516  
  Keywords Paranasal sinuses; headache; magnetic resonance imaging; migraine; opacification; sinus headache; tension headache  
  Abstract Background The association between headache and paranasal sinus disease is still unclear. Because of symptom overlap, the two conditions are not easily studied on the basis of symptoms alone. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether paranasal sinus opacification on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was associated with migraine, tension-type headache (TTH) or unclassified headache. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 844 randomly selected participants (442 women, age range 50-65 years, mean age 57.7 years). Based on 14 headache questions, participants were allocated to four mutually exclusive groups: migraine, TTH, unclassified headache or headache free. On MRI, opacifications as mucosal thickening, polyps/retention cysts and fluid in the five paired sinuses were measured and recorded if >/=1 mm. For each participant, opacification thickness was summed for each sinus and, in addition, a total sum of all sinuses was calculated. Opacification in each sinus was compared between headache-free participants and the headache groups using non-parametric tests, and the total sum was compared by logistical regression. Results No significant association was found between paranasal sinus opacification and headache in general, nor when headache was differentiated into migraine, TTH and unclassified headache. This was also true in separate analyses of mucosal thickening and fluid and of opacification from each paranasal sinus. Conclusion Migraine, TTH and unclassified headache were found not to be associated with an increased degree of paranasal sinus opacification at MRI.  
  Address 5 Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0333-1024 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:27215544 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1921  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Chen, Y.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Wu, C.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title (up) Passive smoking in relation to lung cancer incidence and histologic types in Norwegian adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 50 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Dept of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29025890 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1989  
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Author Grunseit, A.C.; Chau, J.Y.; Rangul, V.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title (up) Patterns of sitting and mortality in the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 8  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Posture; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Self Report; Young Adult; *Cardiovascular disease; *Epidemiology; *Mortality; *Sedentary behaviour  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Current evidence concerning sedentary behaviour and mortality risk has used single time point assessments of sitting. Little is known about how changes in sitting levels over time affect subsequent mortality risk. AIM: To examine the associations between patterns of sitting time assessed at two time points 11 years apart and risk of all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality. METHODS: Participants were 25,651 adults aged > =20 years old from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study with self-reported total sitting time in 1995-1997 (HUNT2) and 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Four categories characterised patterns of sitting: (1) low at HUNT2/ low at HUNT3, 'consistently low sitting'; (2) low at HUNT2/high at HUNT3, 'increased sitting'; (3) high at HUNT2/low at HUNT3, 'reduced sitting'; and (4) high at HUNT2 /high at HUNT3, 'consistently high sitting'. Associations of sitting pattern with all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality were analysed using Cox regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.2 years (158880 person-years); 1212 participants died. Compared to 'consistently low sitting', adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.28-2.78), 1.03 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.06-1.51) for 'increased sitting', 'reduced sitting' and 'consistently high sitting' respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Examining patterns of sitting over time augments single time-point analyses of risk exposures associated with high sitting time. Whilst sitting habits can be stable over a long period, life events (e.g., changing jobs, retiring or illness) may influence sitting trajectories and therefore sitting-attributable risk. Reducing sitting may yield mortality risks comparable to a stable low-sitting pattern.  
  Address Department of Public health and General practice, HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28122625; PMCID:PMC5267382 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1918  
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Author Zisko, N.; Skjerve, K.N.; Tari, A.R.; Sandbakk, S.B.; Wisloff, U.; Nes, B.M.; Nauman, J. url  doi
  Title (up) Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI), Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clustering – the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis  
  Volume 60 Issue 1 Pages 89-95  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Cardiovascular disease risk factors; Exercise; Exercise intensity; Physical activity; Sedentary behavior  
  Abstract Prolonged sedentary behavior (SB) positively associates with clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The recently developed metric for physical activity (PA) tracking called Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI) takes into account age, sex, resting and maximum heart rate, and a score of >/=100 weekly PAI has been shown to reduce the risk of premature CVD death in healthy as well as individuals with known CVD risk factors, regardless of whether or not the current PA recommendations were met. The aim of the present study was to examine if PAI modifies the associations between SB and CVD risk factor (CV-RF) clustering in a large apparently healthy general population cohort (n=29,950, aged >/=20 years). Logistic regression revealed that in those with >/=100 weekly PAI, the likelihood of CV-RF clustering prevalence associated with prolonged SB was attenuated across age groups. Monitoring weekly PAI-level could be useful to ensure that people perform enough PA to combat SB's deleterious association with CV-RF.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Cardiology, St. Olavs Hospital, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-0620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28274818 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2028  
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Author Nes, B.M.; Gutvik, C.R.; Lavie, C.J.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title (up) Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI) for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Promotion of Physical Activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Med  
  Volume 130 Issue 3 Pages 328-336  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Algorithms; Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality/*prevention & control; *Exercise; Female; Health Promotion/*methods; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment/*methods; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Young Adult; Activity tracking; Cardiovascular disease mortality; Physical activity; Prevention  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To derive and validate a single metric of activity tracking that associates with lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. METHODS: We derived an algorithm, Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI), using the HUNT Fitness Study (n = 4631), and validated it in the general HUNT population (n = 39,298) aged 20-74 years. The PAI was divided into three sex-specific groups (</=50, 51-99, and >/=100), and the inactive group (0 PAI) was used as the referent. Hazard ratios for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: After >1 million person-years of observations during a mean follow-up time of 26.2 (SD 5.9) years, there were 10,062 deaths, including 3867 deaths (2207 men and 1660 women) from cardiovascular disease. Men and women with a PAI level >/=100 had 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-27%) and 23% (95% CI, 4%-38%) reduced risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, compared with the inactive groups. Obtaining >/=100 PAI was associated with significantly lower risk for cardiovascular disease mortality in all prespecified age groups, and in participants with known cardiovascular disease risk factors (all P-trends <.01). Participants who did not obtain >/=100 PAI had increased risk of dying regardless of meeting the physical activity recommendations. CONCLUSION: PAI may have a huge potential to motivate people to become and stay physically active, as it is an easily understandable and scientifically proven metric that could inform potential users of how much physical activity is needed to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular disease death.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9343 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27984009 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1964  
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Author Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title (up) Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
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Author Bauman, A.E.; Grunseit, A.C.; Rangul, V.; Heitmann, B.L. url  doi
  Title (up) Physical activity, obesity and mortality: does pattern of physical activity have stronger epidemiological associations? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 788  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Hip circumference; Waist circumference  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortality outcomes, compared to single time-point measure of PA. METHODS: Data were the Danish MONICA (MONItoring Trends and Determinants in CArdiovascular Disease) study over three waves 1982-3 (time 1), 1987-8 (time 2) and 1993-4 (time 3). Associations between leisure time single time-point PA levels at time 1 and time 3, and sport and active travel at times 1 and 2 with BMI, waist, hip circumference and mortality (death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)) were compared to 'PA patterns' spanning multiple time points. PA pattern classified participants' PA as either 1) inactive or low PA at both time points; 2) moderate level PA at time 1 and high activity at time 3; or 3) a 'mixed PA pattern' indicating a varying levels of activity over time. Similarly, sport and active travel were also classified as indicating stable low, stable high and mixed patterns. RESULTS: The moderately and highly active groups for PA at times 1 and 3 had up to 1.7 cm lower increase in waist circumference compared with the inactive/low active group. Across 'PA patterns', 'active maintainers' had a 2.0 cm lower waist circumference than 'inactive/low maintainers'. Waist circumference was inversely related to sport but not active travel. CHD risk did not vary by activity levels at time 1, but was reduced significantly by 43% for high PA at time 3 (vs 'inactive' group) and among 'active maintainers' (vs 'inactive/low maintainers') by 62%. 'Sport pattern' showed stronger reductions in mortality for cardiovascular disease and CHD deaths among sport maintainers, than the single time point measures. CONCLUSIONS: PA patterns demonstrated a stronger association with a number of anthropometric and mortality outcomes than the single time-point measures. Operationalising PA as a sustained behavioural pattern may address some of the known under-estimation of risk for poor health in PA self-report measurements and better reflect exposure for epidemiological analysis of risk of health outcomes.  
  Address Copenhagen Center for Preventive Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen Capital Region, Denmark  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28982371; PMCID:PMC5629749 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1880  
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Author Haug, E.B.; Horn, J.; Fraser, A.; Markovitz, A.R.; Rich-Edwards, J.W.; Davey Smith, G.; Romundstad, P.R.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title (up) Pre-pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal Am J Hypertens  
  Volume 30 Issue 9 Pages e7-e8  
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  Abstract  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0895-7061 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28633300 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1923  
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Author Yu, D.; Takata, Y.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Blot, W.; Sawada, N.; White, E.; Freedman, N.; Robien, K.; Giovannucci, E.; Zhang, X.; Park, Y.; Gao, Y.-T.; Chlebowski, R.T.; Langhammer, A.; Yang, G.; Severi, G.; Manjer, J.; Khaw, K.-T.; Weiderpass, E.; Liao, L.M.; Caporaso, N.; Krokstad, S.; Hveem, K.; Sinha, R.; Ziegler, R.; Tsugane, S.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Johansson, M.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O. url  doi
  Title (up) Prediagnostic Calcium Intake and Lung Cancer Survival: A Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume 26 Issue 7 Pages 1060-1070  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. Little is known about whether prediagnostic nutritional factors may affect survival. We examined the associations of prediagnostic calcium intake from foods and/or supplements with lung cancer survival.Methods: The present analysis included 23,882 incident, primary lung cancer patients from 12 prospective cohort studies. Dietary calcium intake was assessed using food-frequency questionnaires at baseline in each cohort and standardized to caloric intake of 2,000 kcal/d for women and 2,500 kcal/d for men. Stratified, multivariable-adjusted Cox regression was applied to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: The 5-year survival rates were 56%, 21%, and 5.7% for localized, regional, and distant stage lung cancer, respectively. Low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake (<500-600 mg/d, less than half of the recommendation) was associated with a small increase in risk of death compared with recommended calcium intakes (800-1,200 mg/d); HR (95% CI) was 1.07 (1.01-1.13) after adjusting for age, stage, histology, grade, smoking status, pack-years, and other potential prognostic factors. The association between low calcium intake and higher lung cancer mortality was evident primarily among localized/regional stage patients, with HR (95% CI) of 1.15 (1.04-1.27). No association was found for supplemental calcium with survival in the multivariable-adjusted model.Conclusions: This large pooled analysis is the first, to our knowledge, to indicate that low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake may be associated with poorer survival among early-stage lung cancer patients.Impact: This multinational prospective study linked low calcium intake to lung cancer prognosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1060-70. (c)2017 AACR.  
  Address Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. xiao-ou.shu@vanderbilt.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28264875; PMCID:PMC5500413 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2025  
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Author Nauman, J.; Nes, B.M.; Lavie, C.J.; Jackson, A.S.; Sui, X.; Coombes, J.S.; Blair, S.N.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title (up) Prediction of Cardiovascular Mortality by Estimated Cardiorespiratory Fitness Independent of Traditional Risk Factors: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc  
  Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 218-227  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Ischemia/mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Registries; Risk Factors; Stroke/mortality  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) and evaluate the additional contribution of traditional risk factors in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality prediction. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: The study included healthy men (n=18,721) and women (n=19,759) aged 30 to 74 years. A nonexercise algorithm estimated cardiorespiratory fitness. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the primary (CVD mortality) and secondary (all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and stroke mortality) end points. The added predictive value of traditional CVD risk factors was evaluated using the Harrell C statistic and net reclassification improvement. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 16.3 years (range, 0.04-17.4 years), there were 3863 deaths, including 1133 deaths from CVD (734 men and 399 women). Low eCRF was a strong predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality after adjusting for established risk factors. The C statistics for eCRF and CVD mortality were 0.848 (95% CI, 0.836-0.861) and 0.878 (95% CI, 0.862-0.894) for men and women, respectively, increasing to 0.851 (95% CI, 0.839-0.863) and 0.881 (95% CI, 0.865-0.897), respectively, when adding clinical variables. By adding clinical variables to eCRF, the net reclassification improvement of CVD mortality was 0.014 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.051) and 0.052 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.127) in men and women, respectively. CONCLUSION: Low eCRF is independently associated with CVD and all-cause mortality. The inclusion of traditional clinical CVD risk factors added little to risk discrimination and did not improve the classification of risk beyond this simple eCRF measurement, which may be proposed as a practical and cost-effective first-line approach in primary prevention settings.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-6196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27866655 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1963  
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Author Bosnes, I.; Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Stordal, E.; Romild, U.; Nordahl, H.M. url  doi
  Title (up) Prevalence and correlates of successful aging in a population-based sample of older adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Psychogeriatrics Abbreviated Journal Int Psychogeriatr  
  Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 431-440  
  Keywords Hunt; components; correlates; prevalence; successful aging  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The factors influencing successful aging (SA) are of great interest in an aging society. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of SA, the relative importance across age of the three components used to define it (absence of disease and disability, high cognitive and physical function, and active engagement with life), and its correlates. METHODS: Data were extracted from the population-based cross-sectional Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3 2006-2008). Individuals aged 70-89 years with complete datasets for the three components were included (N = 5773 of 8,040, 71.8%). Of the respondents, 54.6% were women. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to analyze possible correlates of SA. RESULTS: Overall, 35.6% of the sample met one of the three criteria, 34.1% met combinations, and 14.5% met all of the three criteria. The most demanding criterion was high function, closely followed by absence of disease, while approximately two-thirds were actively engaged in life. The relative change with age was largest for the high cognitive and physical function component and smallest for active engagement with life. The significant correlates of SA were younger age, female gender, higher education, weekly exercise, more satisfaction with life, non-smoking, and alcohol consumption, whereas marital status was not related to SA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of SA in this study (14.5%) is comparable to previous studies. It may be possible to increase the prevalence by intervention directed toward more exercise, non-smoking, and better satisfaction with life.  
  Address Department of Psychology,Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU),Trondheim,Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1041-6102 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27852332 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1886  
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Author Vindenes, H.K.; Svanes, C.; Lygre, S.H.L.; Hollund, B.-E.; Langhammer, A.; Bertelsen, R.J. url  doi
  Title (up) Prevalence of, and work-related risk factors for, hand eczema in a Norwegian general population (The HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Contact Dermatitis Abbreviated Journal Contact Dermatitis  
  Volume 77 Issue 4 Pages 214-223  
  Keywords Hunt; atopic dermatitis; epidemiology; hand eczema; occupational  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chemical exposures at work and at home may cause hand eczema. However, this has been scarcely described for Norway. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of, and occupational risk factors for, hand eczema in Norway. METHODS: Among 50 805 respondents (aged >/=20 years) to the third Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3), 5757 persons reported ever having hand eczema, and 4206 answered a hand eczema questionnaire. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalences of hand eczema were 8.4% in men and 13.8% in women (p < 0.001), with onset at age </=10 years in 24% (men) and 20% (women), and onset at age >/=30 years in 37% (men) and 25% (women) (p < 0.001). Work-related hand eczema affected 4.8% of the population, and was most frequently associated with health/social work (29%) and occupational cleaning (20%) in women, and with farming (26%) and industrial occupations (27%) in men. Cleaning detergents (75%) and other chemicals (36%) were the most common exacerbating factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hand eczema was 11.3%, and that of work-related hand eczema was 4.8%. Hand eczema was more common in women than in men, but with a later onset in men. Cleaning detergents were the most common aggravating factors. A large proportion of the Nord-Trondelag population is employed in farming, providing the possibility to identify farming as an important risk factor for hand eczema.  
  Address Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, 5021, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0105-1873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28449354 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2031  
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Author Asvold, B.O.; Midthjell, K.; Krokstad, S.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title (up) Prolonged sitting may increase diabetes risk in physically inactive individuals: an 11 year follow-up of the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 60 Issue 5 Pages 830-835  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/metabolism; Exercise/physiology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Epidemiology; Sedentary lifestyle; Type 2 diabetes mellitus  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We examined the association between sitting time and diabetes incidence, overall and by strata of leisure-time physical activity and BMI. METHODS: We followed 28,051 adult participants of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a population-based study, for diabetes incidence from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 and estimated HRs of any diabetes by categories of self-reported total daily sitting time at baseline. RESULTS: Of 28,051 participants, 1253 (4.5%) developed diabetes during 11 years of follow-up. Overall, sitting >/=8 h/day was associated with a 17% (95% CI 2, 34) higher risk of developing diabetes compared with sitting </=4 h/day, adjusted for age, sex and education. However, the association was attenuated to a non-significant 9% (95% CI -5, 26) increase in risk after adjustment for leisure-time physical activity and BMI. The association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by leisure-time physical activity (p Interaction = 0.01). Among participants with low leisure-time physical activity (</=2 h light activity per week and no vigorous activity), sitting 5-7 h/day and >/=8 h/day were associated with a 26% (95% CI 2, 57) and 30% (95% CI 5, 61) higher risk of diabetes, respectively, compared with sitting </=4 h/day. There was no corresponding association among participants with high leisure-time physical activity (>/=3 h light activity or >0 h vigorous activity per week). There was no statistical evidence that the association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by obesity (p Interaction = 0.65). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that total sitting time has little association with diabetes risk in the population as a whole, but prolonged sitting may contribute to an increased diabetes risk among physically inactive people.  
  Address School of Public Health, Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28054097 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1879  
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Author Brumpton, B.; Mai, X.-M.; Langhammer, A.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.; Strand, L.B. url  doi
  Title (up) Prospective study of insomnia and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 49 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Insomnia is highly prevalent among asthmatics; however, few studies have investigated insomnia symptoms and asthma development. We aimed to investigate the association between insomnia and the risk of incident asthma in a population-based cohort.Among 17 927 participants free from asthma at baseline we calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the risk of incident asthma among those with insomnia compared to those without. Participants reported sleep initiation problems, sleep maintenance problems and nonrestorative sleep. Chronic insomnia was defined as those reporting one or more insomnia symptom at baseline and 10 years earlier. Incident asthma was defined by questions on asthma at baseline and follow-up (average 11 years).The prevalence of sleep initiation problems, sleep maintenance problems and nonrestorative sleep were 1%, 1% and 5%, respectively. The multi-adjusted odds ratios were 1.18 (95% CI 0.97-1.44), 1.30 (95% CI 1.03-1.64) and 1.70 (95% CI 1.37-2.11) for people with one, two and three insomnia symptoms, respectively, compared with people without symptoms (p<0.01 for trend). The risk of developing asthma in those with chronic insomnia was three times higher (adjusted OR 3.16, 95% CI 1.37-6.40) than those without.Insomnia symptoms were associated with increased risk of incident asthma in this study.  
  Address Dept of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28153868 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1887  
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Author Modalsli, E.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Langhammer, A.; Hoff, M.; Forsmo, S.; Naldi, L.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title (up) Psoriasis, fracture risk and bone mineral density: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The British Journal of Dermatology Abbreviated Journal Br J Dermatol  
  Volume 176 Issue 5 Pages 1162-1169  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: An association between psoriasis and osteoporosis has been reported. OBJECTIVES: To investigate, in a large prospective population-based Norwegian study, whether psoriasis is associated with increased risk of forearm or hip fracture; to investigate the cross-sectional association between psoriasis and bone mineral density (BMD) T-score in a subpopulation. METHODS: Hospital-derived fracture data from Nord-Trondelag County (1995-2013) were linked to psoriasis information, BMD measurements and lifestyle factors from the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2006-08 (HUNT3); socioeconomic data from the National Education Database; and use of medication from the Norwegian Prescription Database. RESULTS: Among 48 194 participants in HUNT3, we found no increased risk of forearm or hip fracture in 2804 patients with self-reported psoriasis [overall age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-1.31]. No clear association was found between psoriasis and mean BMD T-score; overall age- and sex-adjusted differences in total hip, femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD T-scores were 0.02 (95% CI -0.11 to 0.14), 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.17) and 0.07 (95% CI -0.09 to 0.24), respectively. No clear association was found between psoriasis and prevalent osteoporosis in either total hip, femoral neck or lumbar spine; overall age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio was 0.77 (95% CI 0.54-1.10). Associations did not change substantially after adjustment for education, smoking, systemic steroid use and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: We found no association between psoriasis and risk of fracture. The study did not indicate reduced BMD T-score or higher prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0963 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27718508 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1955  
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Author Talseth, A.; Edna, T.-H.; Hveem, K.; Lydersen, S.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title (up) Quality of life and psychological and gastrointestinal symptoms after cholecystectomy: a population-based cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Gastroenterol  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages e000128  
  Keywords Cholecystectomy; Gastrointestinal Function; Quality Of Life  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The study aims to examine gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life and the risk of psychological symptoms after cholecystectomy. DESIGN: This is a prospective population-based cohort study based on the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Norway. HUNT is a repeated health survey of the county population and includes a wide range of health-related items. In the present study, all 3 HUNT surveys were included, performed between 1984 and 2008. Selected items were scores on quality of life, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and selected gastrointestinal symptoms. Participants who underwent cholecystectomy for gallstone disease between 1 January 1990 and until 1 year before attending HUNT3 were compared with the remaining non-operated cohort. Associations between cholecystectomy and the postoperative scores and symptoms were assessed by multivariable regression models. RESULTS: Participants in HUNT1, HUNT2 and HUNT3 were 77 212 (89.4% of those invited), 65 237 (69.5%) and 50 807 (54.1%), respectively. In the study period, 931 participants were operated with cholecystectomy. Cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of diarrhoea and stomach pain postoperatively. In addition, cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of nausea postoperatively in men. We found no associations between cholecystectomy and quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation following surgery. CONCLUSIONS: In this large population-based cohort study, cholecystectomy was associated with postoperative diarrhoea and stomach pain. Cholecystectomy for gallstone colic was associated with nausea in men. There were no associations between quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-4774 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28761686; PMCID:PMC5508800 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2008  
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Author Marouli, E.; Graff, M.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Lo, K.S.; Wood, A.R.; Kjaer, T.R.; Fine, R.S.; Lu, Y.; Schurmann, C.; Highland, H.M.; Rueger, S.; Thorleifsson, G.; Justice, A.E.; Lamparter, D.; Stirrups, K.E.; Turcot, V.; Young, K.L.; Winkler, T.W.; Esko, T.; Karaderi, T.; Locke, A.E.; Masca, N.G.D.; Ng, M.C.Y.; Mudgal, P.; Rivas, M.A.; Vedantam, S.; Mahajan, A.; Guo, X.; Abecasis, G.; Aben, K.K.; Adair, L.S.; Alam, D.S.; Albrecht, E.; Allin, K.H.; Allison, M.; Amouyel, P.; Appel, E.V.; Arveiler, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Auer, P.L.; Balkau, B.; Banas, B.; Bang, L.E.; Benn, M.; Bergmann, S.; Bielak, L.F.; Bluher, M.; Boeing, H.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boger, C.A.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Bork-Jensen, J.; Bots, M.L.; Bottinger, E.P.; Bowden, D.W.; Brandslund, I.; Breen, G.; Brilliant, M.H.; Broer, L.; Burt, A.A.; Butterworth, A.S.; Carey, D.J.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chambers, J.C.; Chasman, D.I.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Chowdhury, R.; Christensen, C.; Chu, A.Y.; Cocca, M.; Collins, F.S.; Cook, J.P.; Corley, J.; Galbany, J.C.; Cox, A.J.; Cuellar-Partida, G.; Danesh, J.; Davies, G.; de Bakker, P.I.W.; de Borst, G.J.; de Denus, S.; de Groot, M.C.H.; de Mutsert, R.; Deary, I.J.; Dedoussis, G.; Demerath, E.W.; den Hollander, A.I.; Dennis, J.G.; Di Angelantonio, E.; Drenos, F.; Du, M.; Dunning, A.M.; Easton, D.F.; Ebeling, T.; Edwards, T.L.; Ellinor, P.T.; Elliott, P.; Evangelou, E.; Farmaki, A.-E.; Faul, J.D.; Feitosa, M.F.; Feng, S.; Ferrannini, E.; Ferrario, M.M.; Ferrieres, J.; Florez, J.C.; Ford, I.; Fornage, M.; Franks, P.W.; Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Galesloot, T.E.; Gan, W.; Gandin, I.; Gasparini, P.; Giedraitis, V.; Giri, A.; Girotto, G.; Gordon, S.D.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Gorski, M.; Grarup, N.; Grove, M.L.; Gudnason, V.; Gustafsson, S.; Hansen, T.; Harris, K.M.; Harris, T.B.; Hattersley, A.T.; Hayward, C.; He, L.; Heid, I.M.; Heikkila, K.; Helgeland, O.; Hernesniemi, J.; Hewitt, A.W.; Hocking, L.J.; Hollensted, M.; Holmen, O.L.; Hovingh, G.K.; Howson, J.M.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Huang, P.L.; Hveem, K.; Ikram, M.A.; Ingelsson, E.; Jackson, A.U.; Jansson, J.-H.; Jarvik, G.P.; Jensen, G.B.; Jhun, M.A.; Jia, Y.; Jiang, X.; Johansson, S.; Jorgensen, M.E.; Jorgensen, T.; Jousilahti, P.; Jukema, J.W.; Kahali, B.; Kahn, R.S.; Kahonen, M.; Kamstrup, P.R.; Kanoni, S.; Kaprio, J.; Karaleftheri, M.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Karpe, F.; Kee, F.; Keeman, R.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Kitajima, H.; Kluivers, K.B.; Kocher, T.; Komulainen, P.; Kontto, J.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kovacs, P.; Kriebel, J.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Kury, S.; Kuusisto, J.; La Bianca, M.; Laakso, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Lange, E.M.; Lange, L.A.; Langefeld, C.D.; Langenberg, C.; Larson, E.B.; Lee, I.-T.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lewis, C.E.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Gao, R.; Lin, H.; Lin, L.-A.; Lin, X.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Linneberg, A.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Lophatananon, A.; Luan, J.'an; Lubitz, S.A.; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Mackey, D.A.; Madden, P.A.F.; Manning, A.K.; Mannisto, S.; Marenne, G.; Marten, J.; Martin, N.G.; Mazul, A.L.; Meidtner, K.; Metspalu, A.; Mitchell, P.; Mohlke, K.L.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Morgan, A.; Morris, A.D.; Morris, A.P.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Munroe, P.B.; Nalls, M.A.; Nauck, M.; Nelson, C.P.; Neville, M.; Nielsen, S.F.; Nikus, K.; Njolstad, P.R.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ntalla, I.; O'Connel, J.R.; Oksa, H.; Loohuis, L.M.O.; Ophoff, R.A.; Owen, K.R.; Packard, C.J.; Padmanabhan, S.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Pasterkamp, G.; Patel, A.P.; Pattie, A.; Pedersen, O.; Peissig, P.L.; Peloso, G.M.; Pennell, C.E.; Perola, M.; Perry, J.A.; Perry, J.R.B.; Person, T.N.; Pirie, A.; Polasek, O.; Posthuma, D.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rasheed, A.; Rauramaa, R.; Reilly, D.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Renstrom, F.; Ridker, P.M.; Rioux, J.D.; Robertson, N.; Robino, A.; Rolandsson, O.; Rudan, I.; Ruth, K.S.; Saleheen, D.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Sandow, K.; Sapkota, Y.; Sattar, N.; Schmidt, M.K.; Schreiner, P.J.; Schulze, M.B.; Scott, R.A.; Segura-Lepe, M.P.; Shah, S.; Sim, X.; Sivapalaratnam, S.; Small, K.S.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, J.A.; Southam, L.; Spector, T.D.; Speliotes, E.K.; Starr, J.M.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Stringham, H.M.; Stumvoll, M.; Surendran, P.; 't Hart, L.M.; Tansey, K.E.; Tardif, J.-C.; Taylor, K.D.; Teumer, A.; Thompson, D.J.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Thuesen, B.H.; Tonjes, A.; Tromp, G.; Trompet, S.; Tsafantakis, E.; Tuomilehto, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Tyrer, J.P.; Uher, R.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Ulivi, S.; van der Laan, S.W.; Van Der Leij, A.R.; van Duijn, C.M.; van Schoor, N.M.; van Setten, J.; Varbo, A.; Varga, T.V.; Varma, R.; Edwards, D.R.V.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Vestergaard, H.; Vitart, V.; Vogt, T.F.; Vozzi, D.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, C.A.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.; Wareham, N.J.; Warren, H.R.; Wessel, J.; Willems, S.M.; Wilson, J.G.; Witte, D.R.; Woods, M.O.; Wu, Y.; Yaghootkar, H.; Yao, J.; Yao, P.; Yerges-Armstrong, L.M.; Young, R.; Zeggini, E.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, J.H.; Zhao, W.; Zhao, W.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, W.; Rotter, J.I.; Boehnke, M.; Kathiresan, S.; McCarthy, M.I.; Willer, C.J.; Stefansson, K.; Borecki, I.B.; Liu, D.J.; North, K.E.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Pers, T.H.; Lindgren, C.M.; Oxvig, C.; Kutalik, Z.; Rivadeneira, F.; Loos, R.J.F.; Frayling, T.M.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Deloukas, P.; Lettre, G. url  doi
  Title (up) Rare and low-frequency coding variants alter human adult height Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 542 Issue 7640 Pages 186-190  
  Keywords ADAMTS Proteins/genetics; Adult; Alleles; Body Height/*genetics; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics; Female; Gene Frequency/*genetics; Genetic Variation/*genetics; Genome, Human/genetics; Glycoproteins/genetics/metabolism; Glycosaminoglycans/biosynthesis; Hedgehog Proteins/genetics; Humans; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Interferon Regulatory Factors/genetics; Interleukin-11 Receptor alpha Subunit/genetics; Male; Multifactorial Inheritance/genetics; NADPH Oxidase 4; NADPH Oxidases/genetics; Phenotype; Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A/metabolism; Procollagen N-Endopeptidase/genetics; Proteoglycans/biosynthesis; Proteolysis; Receptors, Androgen/genetics; Somatomedins/metabolism  
  Abstract Height is a highly heritable, classic polygenic trait with approximately 700 common associated variants identified through genome-wide association studies so far. Here, we report 83 height-associated coding variants with lower minor-allele frequencies (in the range of 0.1-4.8%) and effects of up to 2 centimetres per allele (such as those in IHH, STC2, AR and CRISPLD2), greater than ten times the average effect of common variants. In functional follow-up studies, rare height-increasing alleles of STC2 (giving an increase of 1-2 centimetres per allele) compromised proteolytic inhibition of PAPP-A and increased cleavage of IGFBP-4 in vitro, resulting in higher bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors. These 83 height-associated variants overlap genes that are mutated in monogenic growth disorders and highlight new biological candidates (such as ADAMTS3, IL11RA and NOX4) and pathways (such as proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan synthesis) involved in growth. Our results demonstrate that sufficiently large sample sizes can uncover rare and low-frequency variants of moderate-to-large effect associated with polygenic human phenotypes, and that these variants implicate relevant genes and pathways.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, H3T 1J4, Canada  
  Corporate Author MAGIC Investigators Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28146470; PMCID:PMC5302847 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1953  
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Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Vie, G.A.; Janszky, I.; Vatten, L.J. url  doi
  Title (up) Reply to Letter to the editor “Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT Study” Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 242 Issue Pages 8  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway; Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28619354 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1882  
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Author Retnakaran, R.; Wen, S.W.; Tan, H.; Zhou, S.; Ye, C.; Shen, M.; Smith, G.N.; Walker, M.C. url  doi
  Title (up) Response to Pre-Pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal Am J Hypertens  
  Volume 30 Issue 9 Pages e9  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0895-7061 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28633294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1973  
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Author Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Bosnes, I.; Stordal, E. url  doi
  Title (up) Selective impact of disease on short-term and long-term components of self-reported memory: a population-based HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e013586  
  Keywords Hunt; disease; health; long-term memory; short-term memory; subjective memory  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Subjective memory is commonly considered to be a unidimensional measure. However, theories of performance-based memory suggest that subjective memory could be divided into more than one dimension. OBJECTIVE: To divide subjective memory into theoretically related components of memory and explore the relationship to disease. METHODS: In this study, various aspects of self-reported memory were studied with respect to demographics and diseases in the third wave of the HUNT epidemiological study in middle Norway. The study included all individuals 55 years of age or older, who responded to a nine-item questionnaire on subjective memory and questionnaires on health (n=18 633). RESULTS: A principle component analysis of the memory items resulted in two memory components; the criterion used was an eigenvalue above 1, which accounted for 54% of the total variance. The components were interpreted as long-term memory (LTM; the first component; 43% of the total variance) and short-term memory (STM; the second component; 11% of the total variance). Memory impairment was significantly related to all diseases (except Bechterew's disease), most strongly to brain infarction, heart failure, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and whiplash. For most diseases, the STM component was more affected than the LTM component; however, in cancer, the opposite pattern was seen. CONCLUSIONS: Subjective memory impairment as measured in HUNT contained two components, which were differentially associated with diseases.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English