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Author Johnsen, M.B.; Hellevik, A.I.; Smastuen, M.C.; Langhammer, A.; Furnes, O.; Flugsrud, G.B.; Nordsletten, L.; Zwart, J.A.; Storheim, K.
Title The mediating effect of body mass index on the relationship between smoking and hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis. A population-based cohort study (the HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0190288
Keywords
Abstract To investigate the total effect of smoking on total hip or knee replacement (THR/TKR) due to primary osteoarthritis (OA) and to quantify the indirect effect of smoking through body mass index (BMI). Participants from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study) were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register to detect the first THR or TKR due to primary OA. A mediation analysis was used to decompose the total effect of smoking into a direct and indirect effect. BMI was considered a mediator in the analysis. All effects were estimated as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The indirect effect of smoking mediated through BMI was expressed as a percentage (proportion*100). In total 55 188 participants were followed up during 17.2 years (median). We identified 1322 THRs and 754 TKRs. For men, the total effect of current vs. never smoking revealed a decreased risk of THR (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.46-0.76) and TKR (HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.32-0.66). For women, current smoking increased the risk of THR (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.60). For men, 6% and 7% of the risk reduction for THR and TKR, respectively, was mediated by BMI. We found a negative association between smoking and THR or TKR for men. On the contrary, smoking was associated with increased risk of THR for women. Most of the effect of smoking on joint replacement risk remained unexplained by BMI.
Address Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29284048; PMCID:PMC5746263 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1933
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Author Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Steinshamn, S.; Mai, X.-M.; Brumpton, B.M.
Title The Prevalence and Symptom Profile of Asthma-COPD Overlap: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Copd Abbreviated Journal Copd
Volume Issue Pages 1-9
Keywords Acos; epidemiology; obstructive lung disease; spirometry
Abstract The concept of asthma and COPD as separate conditions has been questioned, and the term asthma-COPD overlap syndrome has been introduced. We assessed the prevalence, symptoms, and lifestyle factors of asthma-COPD overlap (ACO) in a large Norwegian population-based study. From 2006 to 2008, a total of 50,777 residents of Nord-Trondelag participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway. They completed questionnaires regarding respiratory symptoms, disease status, and medication use. We estimated the prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of ACO. Additionally, spirometry was used to estimate the prevalence of ACO in a subgroup. The prevalence of self-reported ACO was 1.9%, and in age groups <40, 40-60 and >/=60 years it was 0.7%, 1.4%, and 3.2%, respectively. Among those reporting COPD, the proportion of ACO was 0.56. In the spirometry subgroup when ACO was defined as doctor diagnosed asthma ever and FEV1/FVC < 0.70, the prevalence of ACO was 2.0%. All respiratory symptoms, separately or in combination, as well as medication use were reported most frequently in those with ACO compared to the other groups. Strikingly, we observed a two-fold higher proportion of allergic rhinitis in ACO compared to COPD only. In this Norwegian population, the prevalence of self-reported ACO was 1.9%, and the corresponding proportion of ACO among those with COPD was 0.56. Participants with ACO generally had the highest proportions of respiratory symptoms compared to asthma or COPD.
Address d K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1541-2563 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29257905 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1927
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Author Theofylaktopoulou, D.; Midttun, O.; Ueland, P.M.; Meyer, K.; Fanidi, A.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Prentice, R.; Pettinger, M.; Thomson, C.A.; Giles, G.G.; Hodge, A.; Cai, Q.; Blot, W.J.; Wu, J.; Johansson, M.; Hultdin, J.; Grankvist, K.; Stevens, V.L.; McCullough, M.M.; Weinstein, S.J.; Albanes, D.; Ziegler, R.; Freedman, N.D.; Langhammer, A.; Hveem, K.; Naess, M.; Sesso, H.D.; Gaziano, J.M.; Buring, J.E.; Lee, I.-M.; Severi, G.; Zhang, X.; Stampfer, M.J.; Han, J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Le Marchand, L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Wang, R.; Butler, L.M.; Koh, W.-P.; Gao, Y.-T.; Rothman, N.; Ericson, U.; Sonestedt, E.; Visvanathan, K.; Jones, M.R.; Relton, C.; Brennan, P.; Johansson, M.; Ulvik, A.
Title Impaired functional vitamin B6 status is associated with increased risk of lung cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid; Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium; functional vitamin B6 marker; pyridoxal 5'-phosphate
Abstract Circulating vitamin B6 levels have been found to be inversely associated with lung cancer. Most studies have focused on the B6 form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a direct biomarker influenced by inflammation and other factors. Using a functional B6 marker allows further investigation of the potential role of vitamin B6 status in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. We prospectively evaluated the association of the functional marker of vitamin B6 status, the 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid (HK:XA) ratio, with risk of lung cancer in a nested case-control study consisting of 5,364 matched case-control pairs from the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between HK:XA and lung cancer, and random effect models to combine results from different cohorts and regions. High levels of HK:XA, indicating impaired functional B6 status, were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, the odds ratio comparing the fourth and the first quartiles (OR4thvs.1st ) was 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.41). Stratified analyses indicated that this association was primarily driven by cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. Notably, the risk associated with HK:XA was approximately 50% higher in groups with a high relative frequency of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., men, former and current smokers. This risk of squamous cell carcinoma was present in both men and women regardless of smoking status.
Address Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29238985 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2011
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Author Jorgensen, P.; Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Forsmo, S.
Title Mortality in persons with undetected and diagnosed hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and hypothyroidism, compared with persons without corresponding disease – a prospective cohort study; The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Family Practice Abbreviated Journal BMC Fam Pract
Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 98
Keywords Chronic disease; Diabetes; Hypertension; Primary care; Public health; Thyroid disorders
Abstract BACKGROUND: Suggested strategies in reducing the impact of non-communicable diseases (NCD) are early diagnosing and screening. We have limited proof of benefit of population screening for NCD. Increased mortality in persons with diagnosed NCD has been shown for decades. However, mortality in undetected NCD has barely been studied. This paper explores whether all-cause mortality differed between persons with diagnosed hypothyroidism, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and hypertension, compared with persons with undetected-, and with persons without the corresponding disease. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of the general population in Nord-Trondelag, Norway. Persons >/=20 years at baseline 1995-97 were followed until death or June 15, 2016. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute age and multiple adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between disease status and all-cause mortality. The number of participants in the hypothyroidism study was 31,960, in the T2DM study 37,957, and in the hypertension study 63,371. RESULTS: Mortality was increased in persons with diagnosed type 2 diabetes and hypertension, compared to persons without corresponding disease; HR 1.69 (95% CI 1.55-1.84) and HR 1.23 (95% CI 1.09-1.39), respectively. Among persons with undetected T2DM, the HR was 1.21 (95% CI 1.08-1.37), whilst among undetected hypothyroidism and hypertension, mortality was not increased compared with persons without the diseases. Further, the association with mortality was stronger in persons with long duration of T2DM (HR 1.96 (95% CI 1.57-2.44)) and hypertension (HR 1.32 (95% CI 1.17-1.49)), compared with persons with short duration (HR 1.29 (1.09-1.53) and HR 1.16 (1.03-1-30) respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Mortality was increased in persons with diagnosed T2DM and hypertension, and in undetected T2DM, compared with persons without the diseases. The strength of the association with mortality in undetected T2DM was however lower compared with persons with diagnosed T2DM, and mortality was not increased in persons with undetected hypothyroidism and hypertension, compared with persons without the diseases. Thus, future research needs to test more thoroughly if early diagnosing of these diseases, such as general population screening, is beneficial for health.
Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Postbox 8905, 7491, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2296 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29212453; PMCID:PMC5719734 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1935
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Author Carslake, D.; Davey Smith, G.; Gunnell, D.; Davies, N.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.
Title Confounding by ill health in the observed association between BMI and mortality: evidence from the HUNT Study using offspring BMI as an instrument Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Body mass index; cohort study; confounding; instrumental variables; mortality; reverse causation
Abstract Background: The observational association between mortality and body mass index (BMI) is U-shaped, leading to highly publicized suggestions that moderate overweight is beneficial to health. However, it is unclear whether elevated mortality is caused by low BMI or if the association is confounded, for example by concurrent ill health. Methods: Using HUNT, a Norwegian prospective study, 32 452 mother-offspring and 27 747 father-offspring pairs were followed up to 2009. Conventional hazard ratios for parental mortality per standard deviation of BMI were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for behavioural and socioeconomic factors. To estimate hazard ratios with reduced susceptibility to confounding, particularly from concurrent ill health, the BMI of parents' offspring was used as an instrumental variable for parents' own BMI. The shape of mortality-BMI associations was assessed using cubic splines. Results: There were 18 365 parental deaths during follow-up. Conventional associations of mortality from all-causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer with parents' own BMI were substantially nonlinear, with elevated mortality at both extremes and minima at 21-25 kg m-2. Equivalent associations with offspring BMI were positive and there was no evidence of elevated parental mortality at low offspring BMI. The linear instrumental variable hazard ratio for all-cause mortality per standard deviation increase in BMI was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.26), compared with 1.05 (1.03, 1.06) in the conventional analysis. Conclusions: Elevated mortality rates at high BMI appear causal, whereas excess mortality at low BMI is likely exaggerated by confounding by factors including concurrent ill health. Conventional studies probably underestimate the adverse population health consequences of overweight.
Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29206928 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1896
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Author Ness-Jensen, E.; Lagergren, J.
Title Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol
Volume 31 Issue 5 Pages 501-508
Keywords Causality; Disease management; Ethanol; Gastroesophageal reflux; Smoking; Tobacco
Abstract Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when reflux of gastric content causes troublesome symptoms or complications. The main symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation and complications include oesophagitis, strictures, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition to hereditary influence, GORD is associated with lifestyle factors, mainly obesity. Tobacco smoking is regarded as an aetiological factor of GORD, while alcohol consumption is considered a triggering factor of reflux episodes and not a causal factor. Yet, both tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption can reduce the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, facilitating reflux. In addition, tobacco smoking reduces the production of saliva rich in bicarbonate, which is important for buffering and clearance of acid in the oesophagus. Alcohol also has a direct noxious effect on the oesophageal mucosa, which predisposes to acidic injury. Tobacco smoking cessation reduces the risk of GORD symptoms and avoidance of alcohol is encouraged in individuals where alcohol consumption triggers reflux.
Address Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden; School of Cancer Sciences, King's College London, SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: jesper.lagergren@ki.se
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1521-6918 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29195669 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1965
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Author Heuch, I.; Heuch, I.; Hagen, K.; Mai, X.-M.; Langhammer, A.; Zwart, J.-A.
Title Is there an association between vitamin D status and risk of chronic low back pain? A nested case-control analysis in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open
Volume 7 Issue 11 Pages e018521
Keywords back pain; epidemiology; vitamin D and low back
Abstract OBJECTIVES: To explore potential associations between vitamin D status and risk of chronic low back pain (LBP) in a Norwegian cohort, and to investigate whether relationships depend on the season of blood sample collection. DESIGN: A nested case-control study in a prospective data set. SETTING: The Norwegian community-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). Data were collected in the HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) surveys. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Chronic LBP, defined as LBP persisting at least 3 months continuously during the past year. PARTICIPANTS: Among individuals aged 19-55 years without LBP in HUNT2, a data set was generated including 1685 cases with LBP in HUNT3 and 3137 controls without LBP. METHODS: Blood samples from the participants collected in HUNT2 were analysed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level. Associations with LBP in HUNT3 were evaluated by unconditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, sex, work status, physical activity at work and in leisure time, education, smoking, and body mass index. RESULTS: No association between vitamin D status and risk of chronic LBP was found in the total data set (OR per 10 nmol/L 25(OH)D=1.01, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.06) or in individuals with blood samples collected in summer/autumn (OR per 10 nmol/L 25(OH)D=0.99, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.06). For blood samples drawn in winter/spring, associations differed significantly between women and men (p=0.004). Among women a positive association was seen (OR per 10 nmol/L 25(OH)D=1.11, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.20), but among men no significant association was observed (OR per 10 nmol/L 25(OH)D=0.90, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.01). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, no association between vitamin D status and risk of LBP was demonstrated. The association suggested in women for the winter/spring season cannot be regarded as established.
Address Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29175890; PMCID:PMC5719329 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1928
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Author Mauseth, S.A.; Skurtveit, S.; Langhammer, A.; Spigset, O.
Title Incidence of and factors associated with anticholinergic drug use among Norwegian women with urinary incontinence Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Urogynecology Journal Abbreviated Journal Int Urogynecol J
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Anticholinergic drugs; Drug treatment; Epidemiology; Health survey; Prescription patterns; Urinary incontinence
Abstract INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aims of this study were to investigate patterns of prescribing anticholinergic drugs among women with urinary incontinence (UI) and to identify factors associated with prescription of these drugs. METHODS: We analysed questionnaire data on UI from 21,735 women older than 20 years who participated in a cross-sectional population-based study in Nord-Trondelag county, Norway (the HUNT study). These data were linked at the individual level to a national prescription database, and analysed using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the women with UI, 4.5% had been prescribed an anticholinergic drug during the previous 12 months. Prescription was most frequent in women with urge UI (10.5%) and mixed UI (7.0%). Of women with UI without treatment with an anticholinergic drug, 1.8% obtained such a prescription during the subsequent 12 months, corresponding to 3.1% of women with urge UI and 3.0% of women with mixed UI. Characteristics significantly associated with starting treatment were age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe or very severe symptoms, consumption of four or more cups of coffee per day, and having visited a doctor for UI. No association was found with marital status, parity, smoking, alcohol, body mass index or anxiety/depression. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, 4.5% of women with UI were prescribed an anticholinergic drug, and the 12-month incidence of starting treatment was 1.8%. Age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe symptoms, high coffee consumption and having visited a doctor for UI were factors associated with first-time drug prescription.
Address Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0937-3462 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29103164 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1954
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Author Burgel, P.-R.; Paillasseur, J.-L.; Janssens, W.; Piquet, J.; Ter Riet, G.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Cosio, B.; Bakke, P.; Puhan, M.A.; Langhammer, A.; Alfageme, I.; Almagro, P.; Ancochea, J.; Celli, B.R.; Casanova, C.; de-Torres, J.P.; Decramer, M.; Echazarreta, A.; Esteban, C.; Gomez Punter, R.M.; Han, M.L.K.; Johannessen, A.; Kaiser, B.; Lamprecht, B.; Lange, P.; Leivseth, L.; Marin, J.M.; Martin, F.; Martinez-Camblor, P.; Miravitlles, M.; Oga, T.; Sofia Ramirez, A.; Sin, D.D.; Sobradillo, P.; Soler-Cataluna, J.J.; Turner, A.M.; Verdu Rivera, F.J.; Soriano, J.B.; Roche, N.
Title A simple algorithm for the identification of clinical COPD phenotypes Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J
Volume 50 Issue 5 Pages
Keywords
Abstract This study aimed to identify simple rules for allocating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to clinical phenotypes identified by cluster analyses.Data from 2409 COPD patients of French/Belgian COPD cohorts were analysed using cluster analysis resulting in the identification of subgroups, for which clinical relevance was determined by comparing 3-year all-cause mortality. Classification and regression trees (CARTs) were used to develop an algorithm for allocating patients to these subgroups. This algorithm was tested in 3651 patients from the COPD Cohorts Collaborative International Assessment (3CIA) initiative.Cluster analysis identified five subgroups of COPD patients with different clinical characteristics (especially regarding severity of respiratory disease and the presence of cardiovascular comorbidities and diabetes). The CART-based algorithm indicated that the variables relevant for patient grouping differed markedly between patients with isolated respiratory disease (FEV1, dyspnoea grade) and those with multi-morbidity (dyspnoea grade, age, FEV1 and body mass index). Application of this algorithm to the 3CIA cohorts confirmed that it identified subgroups of patients with different clinical characteristics, mortality rates (median, from 4% to 27%) and age at death (median, from 68 to 76 years).A simple algorithm, integrating respiratory characteristics and comorbidities, allowed the identification of clinically relevant COPD phenotypes.
Address Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Cochin Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France
Corporate Author Initiatives BPCO, EABPCO, Leuven and 3CIA study groups Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29097431 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1894
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Author Liu, D.J.; Peloso, G.M.; Yu, H.; Butterworth, A.S.; Wang, X.; Mahajan, A.; Saleheen, D.; Emdin, C.; Alam, D.; Alves, A.C.; Amouyel, P.; Di Angelantonio, E.; Arveiler, D.; Assimes, T.L.; Auer, P.L.; Baber, U.; Ballantyne, C.M.; Bang, L.E.; Benn, M.; Bis, J.C.; Boehnke, M.; Boerwinkle, E.; Bork-Jensen, J.; Bottinger, E.P.; Brandslund, I.; Brown, M.; Busonero, F.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chambers, J.C.; Chasman, D.I.; Chen, Y.E.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Chowdhury, R.; Christensen, C.; Chu, A.Y.; Connell, J.M.; Cucca, F.; Cupples, L.A.; Damrauer, S.M.; Davies, G.; Deary, I.J.; Dedoussis, G.; Denny, J.C.; Dominiczak, A.; Dube, M.-P.; Ebeling, T.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Esko, T.; Farmaki, A.-E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Ferrario, M.; Ferrieres, J.; Ford, I.; Fornage, M.; Franks, P.W.; Frayling, T.M.; Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Fritsche, L.G.; Frossard, P.; Fuster, V.; Ganesh, S.K.; Gao, W.; Garcia, M.E.; Gieger, C.; Giulianini, F.; Goodarzi, M.O.; Grallert, H.; Grarup, N.; Groop, L.; Grove, M.L.; Gudnason, V.; Hansen, T.; Harris, T.B.; Hayward, C.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Holmen, O.L.; Huffman, J.; Huo, Y.; Hveem, K.; Jabeen, S.; Jackson, A.U.; Jakobsdottir, J.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jensen, G.B.; Jorgensen, M.E.; Jukema, J.W.; Justesen, J.M.; Kamstrup, P.R.; Kanoni, S.; Karpe, F.; Kee, F.; Khera, A.V.; Klarin, D.; Koistinen, H.A.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kuulasmaa, K.; Kuusisto, J.; Laakso, M.; Lakka, T.; Langenberg, C.; Langsted, A.; Launer, L.J.; Lauritzen, T.; Liewald, D.C.M.; Lin, L.A.; Linneberg, A.; Loos, R.J.F.; Lu, Y.; Lu, X.; Magi, R.; Malarstig, A.; Manichaikul, A.; Manning, A.K.; Mantyselka, P.; Marouli, E.; Masca, N.G.D.; Maschio, A.; Meigs, J.B.; Melander, O.; Metspalu, A.; Morris, A.P.; Morrison, A.C.; Mulas, A.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Munroe, P.B.; Neville, M.J.; Nielsen, J.B.; Nielsen, S.F.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ordovas, J.M.; Mehran, R.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Orho-Melander, M.; Molony, C.M.; Muntendam, P.; Padmanabhan, S.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Pasko, D.; Patel, A.P.; Pedersen, O.; Perola, M.; Peters, A.; Pisinger, C.; Pistis, G.; Polasek, O.; Poulter, N.; Psaty, B.M.; Rader, D.J.; Rasheed, A.; Rauramaa, R.; Reilly, D.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Renstrom, F.; Rich, S.S.; Ridker, P.M.; Rioux, J.D.; Robertson, N.R.; Roden, D.M.; Rotter, J.I.; Rudan, I.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Sanna, S.; Sattar, N.; Schmidt, E.M.; Scott, R.A.; Sever, P.; Sevilla, R.S.; Shaffer, C.M.; Sim, X.; Sivapalaratnam, S.; Small, K.S.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, B.H.; Somayajula, S.; Southam, L.; Spector, T.D.; Speliotes, E.K.; Starr, J.M.; Stirrups, K.E.; Stitziel, N.; Strauch, K.; Stringham, H.M.; Surendran, P.; Tada, H.; Tall, A.R.; Tang, H.; Tardif, J.-C.; Taylor, K.D.; Trompet, S.; Tsao, P.S.; Tuomilehto, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; van Zuydam, N.R.; Varbo, A.; Varga, T.V.; Virtamo, J.; Waldenberger, M.; Wang, N.; Wareham, N.J.; Warren, H.R.; Weeke, P.E.; Weinstock, J.; Wessel, J.; Wilson, J.G.; Wilson, P.W.F.; Xu, M.; Yaghootkar, H.; Young, R.; Zeggini, E.; Zhang, H.; Zheng, N.S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, Y.; Zoledziewska, M.; Howson, J.M.M.; Danesh, J.; McCarthy, M.I.; Cowan, C.A.; Abecasis, G.; Deloukas, P.; Musunuru, K.; Willer, C.J.; Kathiresan, S.
Title Exome-wide association study of plasma lipids in >300,000 individuals Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet
Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1758-1766
Keywords Coronary Artery Disease/blood/genetics; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood/genetics; Exome/*genetics; Genetic Association Studies/*methods; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics; *Genetic Variation; Genotype; Humans; Lipids/*blood; Macular Degeneration/blood/genetics; Phenotype; Risk Factors
Abstract We screened variants on an exome-focused genotyping array in >300,000 participants (replication in >280,000 participants) and identified 444 independent variants in 250 loci significantly associated with total cholesterol (TC), high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and/or triglycerides (TG). At two loci (JAK2 and A1CF), experimental analysis in mice showed lipid changes consistent with the human data. We also found that: (i) beta-thalassemia trait carriers displayed lower TC and were protected from coronary artery disease (CAD); (ii) excluding the CETP locus, there was not a predictable relationship between plasma HDL-C and risk for age-related macular degeneration; (iii) only some mechanisms of lowering LDL-C appeared to increase risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D); and (iv) TG-lowering alleles involved in hepatic production of TG-rich lipoproteins (TM6SF2 and PNPLA3) tracked with higher liver fat, higher risk for T2D, and lower risk for CAD, whereas TG-lowering alleles involved in peripheral lipolysis (LPL and ANGPTL4) had no effect on liver fat but decreased risks for both T2D and CAD.
Address Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Corporate Author VA Million Veteran Program Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29083408; PMCID:PMC5709146 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1943
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Author Lu, X.; Peloso, G.M.; Liu, D.J.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, W.; Li, J.; Tang, C.S.-M.; Dorajoo, R.; Li, H.; Long, J.; Guo, X.; Xu, M.; Spracklen, C.N.; Chen, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Khor, C.C.; Liu, J.; Sun, L.; Wang, L.; Gao, Y.-T.; Hu, Y.; Yu, K.; Wang, Y.; Cheung, C.Y.Y.; Wang, F.; Huang, J.; Fan, Q.; Cai, Q.; Chen, S.; Shi, J.; Yang, X.; Zhao, W.; Sheu, W.H.-H.; Cherny, S.S.; He, M.; Feranil, A.B.; Adair, L.S.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Du, S.; Varma, R.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Shu, X.-O.; Lam, K.S.L.; Wong, T.Y.; Ganesh, S.K.; Mo, Z.; Hveem, K.; Fritsche, L.G.; Nielsen, J.B.; Tse, H.-F.; Huo, Y.; Cheng, C.-Y.; Chen, Y.E.; Zheng, W.; Tai, E.S.; Gao, W.; Lin, X.; Huang, W.; Abecasis, G.; Kathiresan, S.; Mohlke, K.L.; Wu, T.; Sham, P.C.; Gu, D.; Willer, C.J.
Title Exome chip meta-analysis identifies novel loci and East Asian-specific coding variants that contribute to lipid levels and coronary artery disease Type Meta-Analysis
Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet
Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1722-1730
Keywords Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; Coronary Artery Disease/ethnology/*genetics; Europe; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; Exome/*genetics; Far East; Gene Frequency; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/ethnology/*genetics; *Genetic Variation; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Lipid Metabolism/*genetics; Lipids/analysis
Abstract Most genome-wide association studies have been of European individuals, even though most genetic variation in humans is seen only in non-European samples. To search for novel loci associated with blood lipid levels and clarify the mechanism of action at previously identified lipid loci, we used an exome array to examine protein-coding genetic variants in 47,532 East Asian individuals. We identified 255 variants at 41 loci that reached chip-wide significance, including 3 novel loci and 14 East Asian-specific coding variant associations. After a meta-analysis including >300,000 European samples, we identified an additional nine novel loci. Sixteen genes were identified by protein-altering variants in both East Asians and Europeans, and thus are likely to be functional genes. Our data demonstrate that most of the low-frequency or rare coding variants associated with lipids are population specific, and that examining genomic data across diverse ancestries may facilitate the identification of functional genes at associated loci.
Address Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Corporate Author GLGC Consortium Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29083407 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1957
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Author Ferreira, M.A.; Vonk, J.M.; Baurecht, H.; Marenholz, I.; Tian, C.; Hoffman, J.D.; Helmer, Q.; Tillander, A.; Ullemar, V.; van Dongen, J.; Lu, Y.; Ruschendorf, F.; Esparza-Gordillo, J.; Medway, C.W.; Mountjoy, E.; Burrows, K.; Hummel, O.; Grosche, S.; Brumpton, B.M.; Witte, J.S.; Hottenga, J.-J.; Willemsen, G.; Zheng, J.; Rodriguez, E.; Hotze, M.; Franke, A.; Revez, J.A.; Beesley, J.; Matheson, M.C.; Dharmage, S.C.; Bain, L.M.; Fritsche, L.G.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Balliu, B.; Nielsen, J.B.; Zhou, W.; Hveem, K.; Langhammer, A.; Holmen, O.L.; Loset, M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Willer, C.J.; Arnold, A.; Homuth, G.; Schmidt, C.O.; Thompson, P.J.; Martin, N.G.; Duffy, D.L.; Novak, N.; Schulz, H.; Karrasch, S.; Gieger, C.; Strauch, K.; Melles, R.B.; Hinds, D.A.; Hubner, N.; Weidinger, S.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Jansen, R.; Jorgenson, E.; Lee, Y.-A.; Boomsma, D.I.; Almqvist, C.; Karlsson, R.; Koppelman, G.H.; Paternoster, L.
Title Shared genetic origin of asthma, hay fever and eczema elucidates allergic disease biology Type Meta-Analysis
Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet
Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1752-1757
Keywords Asthma/*genetics; Eczema/*genetics; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics; Genome-Wide Association Study/methods; Humans; Hypersensitivity/*genetics; Phenotype; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal/*genetics; Risk Factors
Abstract Asthma, hay fever (or allergic rhinitis) and eczema (or atopic dermatitis) often coexist in the same individuals, partly because of a shared genetic origin. To identify shared risk variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS; n = 360,838) of a broad allergic disease phenotype that considers the presence of any one of these three diseases. We identified 136 independent risk variants (P < 3 x 10(-8)), including 73 not previously reported, which implicate 132 nearby genes in allergic disease pathophysiology. Disease-specific effects were detected for only six variants, confirming that most represent shared risk factors. Tissue-specific heritability and biological process enrichment analyses suggest that shared risk variants influence lymphocyte-mediated immunity. Six target genes provide an opportunity for drug repositioning, while for 36 genes CpG methylation was found to influence transcription independently of genetic effects. Asthma, hay fever and eczema partly coexist because they share many genetic risk variants that dysregulate the expression of immune-related genes.
Address MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
Corporate Author LifeLines Cohort Study Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29083406 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1903
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Wu, C.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M.
Title Associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level with incidence of lung cancer and histologic types in Norwegian adults: a case-cohort analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Case-cohort study; Histologic types; Lung cancer; Pulmonary adenocarcinoma; Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; Vitamin D
Abstract Previous prospective studies have shown inconsistent associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and lung cancer incidence. The aim of the present study was to explore the associations of serum 25(OH)D levels with incidence of lung cancer overall and different histologic types. We performed a population-based prospective case-cohort study including 696 incident lung cancer cases and 5804 individuals in a subcohort who participated in the second survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway. Cox proportional hazards regression models counting for the case-cohort design were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) for lung cancer overall or histologic types in relation to serum 25(OH)D levels. Compared with the fourth season-specific quartile of 25(OH)D (median 68.0 nmol/L), lower 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the incidence of overall, small or squamous cell lung cancer. However, the risk of adenocarcinoma was lower in the second and third quartiles (median 39.9 and 51.5 nmol/L) compared with the fourth quartile, with HRs of 0.63 (95% CI 0.41-0.98) and 0.58 (0.38-0.88), respectively. The associations of lower levels of 25(OH)D with a reduced risk of adenocarcinoma were only observed in the overweight/obese subjects [HRs for second and third quartiles: 0.40 (0.22-0.72) and 0.50 (0.27-0.92)] but not in the normal weight subjects [HRs: 0.95 (0.52-1.75) and 0.60 (0.32-1.10)]. Serum 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the risk of lung cancer in general. The observation that lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with a lower risk of adenocarcinoma should be interpreted with caution.
Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29080012 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2007
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Nordsletten, L.; Johnsen, M.B.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Langhammer, A.
Title Corrigendum to “Age of menarche is associated with knee joint replacement due to primary osteoarthritis (The HUNT Study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register)” [Osteoarthr Cartil 25 (2017) 1654-1662] Type Published Erratum
Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage
Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 2148-2149
Keywords
Abstract
Address The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29066295 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1926
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Author Gemes, K.; Malmo, V.; Laugsand, L.E.; Loennechen, J.P.; Ellekjaer, H.; Laszlo, K.D.; Ahnve, S.; Vatten, L.J.; Mukamal, K.J.; Janszky, I.
Title Does Moderate Drinking Increase the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation? The Norwegian HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health) Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of the American Heart Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Heart Assoc
Volume 6 Issue 10 Pages
Keywords Hunt; alcohol; atrial fibrillation; cohort study; epidemiology; moderate alcohol
Abstract BACKGROUND: Compelling evidence suggests that excessive alcohol consumption increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the effect of light-moderate alcohol consumption is less certain. We investigated the association between alcohol consumption within recommended limits and AF risk in a light-drinking population. METHODS AND RESULTS: Among 47 002 participants with information on alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort study in Norway, conducted from October 2006 to June 2008, 1697 validated AF diagnoses were registered during the 8 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazard models with fractional polynomials to analyze the association between alcohol intake and AF. Population attributable risk for drinking within the recommended limit (ie, at most 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men without risky drinking) compared with nondrinking was also calculated. The average alcohol intake was 3.8+/-4.8 g/d. The adjusted hazard ratio for AF was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.80) when we compared participants consuming >7 drinks per week with abstainers. When we modeled the quantity of alcohol intake as a continuous variable, the risk increased in a curvilinear manner. It was higher with heavier alcohol intake, but there was virtually no association at <1 drink per day for women and <2 drinks per day for men in the absence of risky drinking. The population attributable risk among nonrisky drinkers was 0.07% (95% confidence interval, -0.01% to 0.13%). CONCLUSIONS: Although alcohol consumption was associated with a curvilinearly increasing risk of AF in general, the attributable risk of alcohol consumption within recommended limits among participants without binge or problem drinking was negligible in this population.
Address Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2047-9980 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29054845; PMCID:PMC5721892 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1901
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Chen, Y.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Wu, C.; Mai, X.-M.
Title Passive smoking in relation to lung cancer incidence and histologic types in Norwegian adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J
Volume 50 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address Dept of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29025890 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1989
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Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Nordestgaard, A.T.; Taylor, A.E.; Treur, J.L.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Munafo, M.R.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.; Davey Smith, G.
Title Heavier smoking increases coffee consumption: findings from a Mendelian randomization analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Coffee, tea, smoking, Mendelian randomization
Abstract Background: There is evidence for a positive relationship between cigarette and coffee consumption in smokers. Cigarette smoke increases metabolism of caffeine, so this may represent a causal effect of smoking on caffeine intake. Methods: We performed Mendelian randomization analyses in the UK Biobank ( N = 114 029), the Norwegian HUNT study ( N = 56 664) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS) ( N = 78 650). We used the rs16969968 genetic variant as a proxy for smoking heaviness in all studies and rs4410790 and rs2472297 as proxies for coffee consumption in UK Biobank and CGPS. Analyses were conducted using linear regression and meta-analysed across studies. Results: Each additional cigarette per day consumed by current smokers was associated with higher coffee consumption (0.10 cups per day, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.17). There was weak evidence for an increase in tea consumption per additional cigarette smoked per day (0.04 cups per day, 95% CI: -0.002, 0.07). There was strong evidence that each additional copy of the minor allele of rs16969968 (which increases daily cigarette consumption) in current smokers was associated with higher coffee consumption (0.16 cups per day, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.20), but only weak evidence for an association with tea consumption (0.04 cups per day, 95% CI: -0.01, 0.09). There was no clear evidence that rs16969968 was associated with coffee or tea consumption in never or former smokers or that the coffee-related variants were associated with cigarette consumption. Conclusions: Higher cigarette consumption causally increases coffee intake. This is consistent with faster metabolism of caffeine by smokers, but could also reflect a behavioural effect of smoking on coffee drinking.
Address School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29025033 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1881
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Author Bauman, A.E.; Grunseit, A.C.; Rangul, V.; Heitmann, B.L.
Title Physical activity, obesity and mortality: does pattern of physical activity have stronger epidemiological associations? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 788
Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Hip circumference; Waist circumference
Abstract BACKGROUND: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortality outcomes, compared to single time-point measure of PA. METHODS: Data were the Danish MONICA (MONItoring Trends and Determinants in CArdiovascular Disease) study over three waves 1982-3 (time 1), 1987-8 (time 2) and 1993-4 (time 3). Associations between leisure time single time-point PA levels at time 1 and time 3, and sport and active travel at times 1 and 2 with BMI, waist, hip circumference and mortality (death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)) were compared to 'PA patterns' spanning multiple time points. PA pattern classified participants' PA as either 1) inactive or low PA at both time points; 2) moderate level PA at time 1 and high activity at time 3; or 3) a 'mixed PA pattern' indicating a varying levels of activity over time. Similarly, sport and active travel were also classified as indicating stable low, stable high and mixed patterns. RESULTS: The moderately and highly active groups for PA at times 1 and 3 had up to 1.7 cm lower increase in waist circumference compared with the inactive/low active group. Across 'PA patterns', 'active maintainers' had a 2.0 cm lower waist circumference than 'inactive/low maintainers'. Waist circumference was inversely related to sport but not active travel. CHD risk did not vary by activity levels at time 1, but was reduced significantly by 43% for high PA at time 3 (vs 'inactive' group) and among 'active maintainers' (vs 'inactive/low maintainers') by 62%. 'Sport pattern' showed stronger reductions in mortality for cardiovascular disease and CHD deaths among sport maintainers, than the single time point measures. CONCLUSIONS: PA patterns demonstrated a stronger association with a number of anthropometric and mortality outcomes than the single time-point measures. Operationalising PA as a sustained behavioural pattern may address some of the known under-estimation of risk for poor health in PA self-report measurements and better reflect exposure for epidemiological analysis of risk of health outcomes.
Address Copenhagen Center for Preventive Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen Capital Region, Denmark
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28982371; PMCID:PMC5629749 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1880
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Taylor, A.E.; Carslake, D.; de Mola, C.L.; Rydell, M.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Horta, B.L.; Pearson, R.; Rai, D.; Galanti, M.R.; Barros, F.C.; Romundstad, P.R.; Davey Smith, G.; Munafo, M.R.
Title Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy and Offspring Depression: a cross cohort and negative control study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 12579
Keywords
Abstract Previous reports suggest that offspring of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have greater risk of developing depression. However, it is unclear whether this is due to intrauterine effects. Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) from the UK (N = 2,869), the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) from Norway (N = 15,493), the Pelotas 1982 Birth Cohort Study from Brazil (N = 2,626), and the Swedish Sibling Health Cohort (N = 258 sibling pairs), we compared associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy and mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy with offspring depression and performed a discordant sibling analysis. In meta-analysis, maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher odds of offspring depression (OR 1.20, 95% CI:1.08,1.34), but mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy was not (OR 1.05, 95% CI:0.94,1.17). However, there was only weak statistical evidence that the odds ratios for maternal and mother's partner's smoking differed from each other (p = 0.08). There was no clear evidence for an association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring depression in the sibling analysis. Findings do not provide strong support for a causal role of maternal smoking during pregnancy in offspring depression, rather observed associations may reflect residual confounding relating to characteristics of parents who smoke.
Address UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28974730; PMCID:PMC5626710 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2010
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gulati, A.M.; Hoff, M.; Salvesen, O.; Dhainaut, A.; Semb, A.G.; Kavanaugh, A.; Haugeberg, G.
Title Bone mineral density in patients with psoriatic arthritis: data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication RMD Open Abbreviated Journal RMD Open
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages e000413
Keywords Psoriatic arthritis; bone mineral density; osteoporosis
Abstract BACKGROUND: The risk of osteoporosis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in patients with PsA and controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with PsA and controls were recruited from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) 3. RESULTS: Patients with PsA (n=69) and controls (n=11 703) were comparable in terms of age (56.8 vs 55.3 years, p=0.32), gender distribution (females 65.2% vs 64.3%, p=0.87) and postmenopausal status (75.6% vs 62.8%, p=0.08). Body mass index (BMI) was higher in patients with PsA compared with controls (28.5 vs 27.2 kg/m(2), p=0.01). After adjusting for potential confounding factors (including BMI), BMD was higher in patients with PsA compared with controls at lumbar spine 1-4 (1.213 vs 1.147 g/cm(2), p=0.003) and femoral neck (0.960 vs 0.926 g/cm(2), p=0.02), but not at total hip (1.013 vs 0.982 g/cm(2), p=0.11). Controls had significantly higher odds of having osteopenia or osteoporosis based on measurements of BMD in both the femoral neck (p=0.001), total hip (p=0.033) and lumbar spine (p=0.033). CONCLUSION: Our population-based data showed comparable BMD in patients with PsA and controls. This supports that the PsA population is not at increased risk of osteoporosis.
Address Department of Rheumatology, Martina Hansens Hospital, Brum, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2056-5933 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28955483; PMCID:PMC5604602 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1919
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Author Folling, I.S.; Kulseng, B.; Midthjell, K.; Rangul, V.; Helvik, A.-S.
Title Individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes invited to a lifestyle program: characteristics of participants versus non-participants (the HUNT Study) and 24-month follow-up of participants (the VEND-RISK Study) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care
Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages e000368
Keywords Findrisc; lifestyle programme; non-participants; primary health care; type 2 diabetes
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus is possible through lifestyle programs, but the effect depends on the program's content, resources, and setting. Lifestyle programs are often confronted with high rates of non-participation and attrition. This study invited individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes to a lifestyle program in the Norwegian primary healthcare setting. The aims were to investigate possible differences in characteristics between participants and non-participants and to study the effect of the lifestyle program at 24-month follow-up for participants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals identified at high risk for type 2 diabetes during the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3) from two municipalities (n=332) were invited to a lifestyle program (the VEND-RISK Study). A cross-sectional design was used to explore if the participants' characteristics differed from non-participants. A non-randomized, single-arm, pre-post examination was used to examine the effect of the lifestyle program on participants' characteristics at 24-month follow-up. RESULTS: Of all individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes invited to the lifestyle program, 86% (287/332) declined to participate. Non-participating women had fewer years of education (p<0.001), compared with participating women. For men, no differences were seen between non-participants and participants. Among all participants (n=45) at 24-month follow-up, none had developed type 2 diabetes, and HbA1c (p<0.001) had decreased significantly. There was a small reduction in mean body mass index from baseline to 24 months that was not statistically significant. For women, waist circumference (-4.0 cm, p<0.001) decreased significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Future research regarding individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes in the primary healthcare lifestyle program should focus on how to promote recruitment of women with low education. Participants attending this study's lifestyle program improved their cardiometabolic markers. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT01135901; Results.
Address St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2052-4897 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28878932; PMCID:PMC5574427 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1899
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhou, W.; Fritsche, L.G.; Das, S.; Zhang, H.; Nielsen, J.B.; Holmen, O.L.; Chen, J.; Lin, M.; Elvestad, M.B.; Hveem, K.; Abecasis, G.R.; Kang, H.M.; Willer, C.J.
Title Improving power of association tests using multiple sets of imputed genotypes from distributed reference panels Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Genetic Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Genet Epidemiol
Volume 41 Issue 8 Pages 744-755
Keywords Gwas; genotype imputation; multiple reference panels; population-specific; study power
Abstract The accuracy of genotype imputation depends upon two factors: the sample size of the reference panel and the genetic similarity between the reference panel and the target samples. When multiple reference panels are not consented to combine together, it is unclear how to combine the imputation results to optimize the power of genetic association studies. We compared the accuracy of 9,265 Norwegian genomes imputed from three reference panels-1000 Genomes phase 3 (1000G), Haplotype Reference Consortium (HRC), and a reference panel containing 2,201 Norwegian participants from the population-based Nord Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) from low-pass genome sequencing. We observed that the population-matched reference panel allowed for imputation of more population-specific variants with lower frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.05% and 0.5%). The overall imputation accuracy from the population-specific panel was substantially higher than 1000G and was comparable with HRC, despite HRC being 15-fold larger. These results recapitulate the value of population-specific reference panels for genotype imputation. We also evaluated different strategies to utilize multiple sets of imputed genotypes to increase the power of association studies. We observed that testing association for all variants imputed from any panel results in higher power to detect association than the alternative strategy of including only one version of each genetic variant, selected for having the highest imputation quality metric. This was particularly true for lower frequency variants (MAF < 1%), even after adjusting for the additional multiple testing burden.
Address Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0741-0395 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28861891 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2026
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Author Neumann, L.; Dapp, U.; Jacobsen, W.; van Lenthe, F.; von Renteln-Kruse, W.
Title The MINDMAP project: mental well-being in urban environments : Design and first results of a survey on healthcare planning policies, strategies and programmes that address mental health promotion and mental disorder prevention for older people in Europe Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie Abbreviated Journal Z Gerontol Geriatr
Volume 50 Issue 7 Pages 588-602
Keywords Functional competence; Geriatrics; Longitudinal cohort ageing studies; Mental health; Urban environment
Abstract BACKGROUND: The MINDMAP consortium (2016-2019) aims to identify opportunities provided by the urban environment for the promotion of mental well-being and functioning of older people in Europe by bringing together European cities with urban longitudinal ageing studies: GLOBE, HAPIEE, HUNT, LASA, LUCAS, RECORD, Rotterdam Study, Turin Study. A survey on mental healthcare planning policies and programmes dedicated to older persons covering the range from health promotion to need of nursing care was performed for profound data interpretation in Amsterdam, Eindhoven, Hamburg, Helsinki, Kaunas, Krakow, London, Nord-Trondelag, Paris, Prague, Rotterdam and Turin. OBJECTIVES: To collect detailed information on healthcare planning policies and programmes across these European cities to evaluate variations and to delineate recommendations for sciences, policies and planners using experience from evidence-based practice feedback from the MINDMAP cities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The MINDMAP partners identified experts in the 12 cities with the best background knowledge of the mental health sector. After pretesting, semi-structured telephone interviews (1-2 h) were performed always by the same person. A structured evaluation matrix based on the geriatric functioning continuum and the World Health Organization (WHO) Public Health Framework for Healthy Ageing was applied. RESULTS: A complete survey (12 out of 12) was performed reporting on 41 policies and 280 programmes on the city level. It appeared from extensive analyses that the focus on older citizens, specific target groups, and multidimensional programmes could be intensified. CONCLUSION: There is a broad variety to cope with the challenges of ageing in health, and to address both physical and mental capacities in older individuals and their dynamic interactions in urban environments.
Address Geriatrics Centre, Scientific Department at the University of Hamburg, Albertinen-Haus, Sellhopsweg 18-22, 22459, Hamburg, Germany. w.renteln-kruse@albertinen.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title Das MINDMAP Projekt: mentale Gesundheit in stadtischen Lebensraumen : Design und erste Ergebnisse einer Umfrage zu gesundheitspolitischen Planungen, Strategien und Programmen zur Forderung der mentalen Gesundheit und Pravention mentaler Storungen alterer Menschen in Europa
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0948-6704 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28819693; PMCID:PMC5649390 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1966
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Author Machiela, M.J.; Hofmann, J.N.; Carreras-Torres, R.; Brown, K.M.; Johansson, M.; Wang, Z.; Foll, M.; Li, P.; Rothman, N.; Savage, S.A.; Gaborieau, V.; McKay, J.D.; Ye, Y.; Henrion, M.; Bruinsma, F.; Jordan, S.; Severi, G.; Hveem, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Fletcher, T.; Koppova, K.; Larsson, S.C.; Wolk, A.; Banks, R.E.; Selby, P.J.; Easton, D.F.; Pharoah, P.; Andreotti, G.; Freeman, L.E.B.; Koutros, S.; Albanes, D.; Mannisto, S.; Weinstein, S.; Clark, P.E.; Edwards, T.E.; Lipworth, L.; Gapstur, S.M.; Stevens, V.L.; Carol, H.; Freedman, M.L.; Pomerantz, M.M.; Cho, E.; Kraft, P.; Preston, M.A.; Wilson, K.M.; Gaziano, J.M.; Sesso, H.S.; Black, A.; Freedman, N.D.; Huang, W.-Y.; Anema, J.G.; Kahnoski, R.J.; Lane, B.R.; Noyes, S.L.; Petillo, D.; Colli, L.M.; Sampson, J.N.; Besse, C.; Blanche, H.; Boland, A.; Burdette, L.; Prokhortchouk, E.; Skryabin, K.G.; Yeager, M.; Mijuskovic, M.; Ognjanovic, M.; Foretova, L.; Holcatova, I.; Janout, V.; Mates, D.; Mukeriya, A.; Rascu, S.; Zaridze, D.; Bencko, V.; Cybulski, C.; Fabianova, E.; Jinga, V.; Lissowska, J.; Lubinski, J.; Navratilova, M.; Rudnai, P.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Benhamou, S.; Cancel-Tassin, G.; Cussenot, O.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Canzian, F.; Duell, E.J.; Ljungberg, B.; Sitaram, R.T.; Peters, U.; White, E.; Anderson, G.L.; Johnson, L.; Luo, J.; Buring, J.; Lee, I.-M.; Chow, W.-H.; Moore, L.E.; Wood, C.; Eisen, T.; Larkin, J.; Choueiri, T.K.; Lathrop, G.M.; Teh, B.T.; Deleuze, J.-F.; Wu, X.; Houlston, R.S.; Brennan, P.; Chanock, S.J.; Scelo, G.; Purdue, M.P.
Title Genetic Variants Related to Longer Telomere Length are Associated with Increased Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication European Urology Abbreviated Journal Eur Urol
Volume 72 Issue 5 Pages 747-754
Keywords Genetic variants; Mendelian randomization; Renal cell carcinoma; Risk; Telomere length
Abstract BACKGROUND: Relative telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been evaluated as a potential biomarker for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk in several studies, with conflicting findings. OBJECTIVE: We performed an analysis of genetic variants associated with leukocyte telomere length to assess the relationship between telomere length and RCC risk using Mendelian randomization, an approach unaffected by biases from temporal variability and reverse causation that might have affected earlier investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Genotypes from nine telomere length-associated variants for 10 784 cases and 20 406 cancer-free controls from six genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of RCC were aggregated into a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) predictive of leukocyte telomere length. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Odds ratios (ORs) relating the GRS and RCC risk were computed in individual GWAS datasets and combined by meta-analysis. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Longer genetically inferred telomere length was associated with an increased risk of RCC (OR=2.07 per predicted kilobase increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]:=1.70-2.53, p<0.0001). As a sensitivity analysis, we excluded two telomere length variants in linkage disequilibrium (R(2)>0.5) with GWAS-identified RCC risk variants (rs10936599 and rs9420907) from the telomere length GRS; despite this exclusion, a statistically significant association between the GRS and RCC risk persisted (OR=1.73, 95% CI=1.36-2.21, p<0.0001). Exploratory analyses for individual histologic subtypes suggested comparable associations with the telomere length GRS for clear cell (N=5573, OR=1.93, 95% CI=1.50-2.49, p<0.0001), papillary (N=573, OR=1.96, 95% CI=1.01-3.81, p=0.046), and chromophobe RCC (N=203, OR=2.37, 95% CI=0.78-7.17, p=0.13). CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation adds to the growing body of evidence indicating some aspect of longer telomere length is important for RCC risk. PATIENT SUMMARY: Telomeres are segments of DNA at chromosome ends that maintain chromosomal stability. Our study investigated the relationship between genetic variants associated with telomere length and renal cell carcinoma risk. We found evidence suggesting individuals with inherited predisposition to longer telomere length are at increased risk of developing renal cell carcinoma.
Address Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MS, USA. Electronic address: purduem@mail.nih.gov
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