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Author Talseth, A.; Edna, T.-H.; Hveem, K.; Lydersen, S.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Quality of life and psychological and gastrointestinal symptoms after cholecystectomy: a population-based cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Gastroenterol  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages e000128  
  Keywords Cholecystectomy; Gastrointestinal Function; Quality Of Life  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The study aims to examine gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life and the risk of psychological symptoms after cholecystectomy. DESIGN: This is a prospective population-based cohort study based on the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Norway. HUNT is a repeated health survey of the county population and includes a wide range of health-related items. In the present study, all 3 HUNT surveys were included, performed between 1984 and 2008. Selected items were scores on quality of life, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and selected gastrointestinal symptoms. Participants who underwent cholecystectomy for gallstone disease between 1 January 1990 and until 1 year before attending HUNT3 were compared with the remaining non-operated cohort. Associations between cholecystectomy and the postoperative scores and symptoms were assessed by multivariable regression models. RESULTS: Participants in HUNT1, HUNT2 and HUNT3 were 77 212 (89.4% of those invited), 65 237 (69.5%) and 50 807 (54.1%), respectively. In the study period, 931 participants were operated with cholecystectomy. Cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of diarrhoea and stomach pain postoperatively. In addition, cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of nausea postoperatively in men. We found no associations between cholecystectomy and quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation following surgery. CONCLUSIONS: In this large population-based cohort study, cholecystectomy was associated with postoperative diarrhoea and stomach pain. Cholecystectomy for gallstone colic was associated with nausea in men. There were no associations between quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-4774 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28761686; PMCID:PMC5508800 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2008  
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Author Li, J.; Wu, B.; Selbaek, G.; Krokstad, S.; Helvik, A.-S. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with consumption of alcohol in older adults – a comparison between two cultures, China and Norway: the CLHLS and the HUNT-study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Geriatrics Abbreviated Journal BMC Geriatr  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 172  
  Keywords Abstainers; Alcohol consumption; China; Elderly; Norway; Older adults  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about the consumption of alcohol among Chinese and Norwegian older adults aged 65 years and over. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and factors related to alcohol consumption among older adults in China and Norway. METHODS: The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) data in 2008-2009 conducted in China and The Nord-Trondelag Health Study data in 2006-2008 (HUNT3) conducted in Norway were used. Mulitvariable logistic regression was used to test the factors related to alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The prevalence of participants who drink alcohol in the Chinese and Norwegian sample were 19.88% and 46.2%, respectively. The weighted prevalence of participants with consumption of alcohol in the Chinese sample of women and men were 7.20% and 34.14%, respectively. In the Norwegian sample, the prevalence of consumption of alcohol were 43.31% and 65.35% for women and men, respectively. Factors such as younger age, higher level of education, living in urban areas, living with spouse or partner, and better health status were related to higher likelihood of alcohol consumption among Norwegian older women and men; while reported better health status and poorer life satisfaction were related to higher likelihood of alcohol consumption among Chinese. In addition, rural males and older females with higher level of education were more likely to consume alcohol. CONCLUSION: The alcohol consumption patterns were quite different between China and Norway. Besides economic development levels and cultures in the two different countries, demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, overall health status, and life satisfaction were associated with alcohol consumption as well.  
  Address St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2318 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28760157; PMCID:PMC5537928 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1947  
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Author Selmeryd, J.; Henriksen, E.; Dalen, H.; Hedberg, P. url  doi
  Title Derivation and Evaluation of Age-Specific Multivariate Reference Regions to Aid in Identification of Abnormal Filling Patterns: The HUNT and VaMIS Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication JACC. Cardiovascular Imaging Abbreviated Journal JACC Cardiovasc Imaging  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Doppler; diastolic dysfunction; echocardiography; heart failure; reference values  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to derive age-specific multivariate reference regions (MVRs) able to classify subjects into those having normal or abnormal filling patterns and to evaluate the prognostic impact of this classification. BACKGROUND: The integration of several parameters is necessary to diagnose disorders of left ventricular (LV) filling because no single measurement accurately describes the complexity of diastolic function. However, no generally accepted validated multiparametric algorithm currently exists. METHODS: A cohort of 1,240 apparently healthy subjects from HUNT (the Nord-Trondelag Health Study) with measured early (E) and late (A) mitral inflow velocity and early mitral annular diastolic tissue velocity (e') were used to derive univariate 95% reference bands and age-specific MVRs. Subsequently, the prognostic impact of this MVR-based classification was evaluated by Cox regression in a community-based cohort (n = 726) and in a cohort of subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction (n = 551). Both evaluation cohorts were derived from VaMIS (the Vastmanland Myocardial Infarction Study). RESULTS: Univariate reference bands and MVRs are presented graphically and as regression equations. After adjustment for sex, age, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes, prior ischemic heart disease, LV mass, LV ejection fraction, and left atrial size, the hazard ratio associated with abnormal filling patterns in the community-based cohort was 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.0; p < 0.001) and that in the acute myocardial infarction cohort was 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.8; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: This study derived age-specific MVRs for identification of abnormal LV filling patterns and showed, in a community-based cohort and in a cohort of patients with recent acute myocardial infarction, that these MVRs conveyed important prognostic information. An MVR-based classification of LV filling patterns could lead to more consistent diagnostic algorithms for identification of different filling disorders.  
  Address Department of Clinical Physiology, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1876-7591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28734926 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1977  
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Nordsletten, L.; Johnsen, M.B.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Age of menarche is associated with knee joint replacement due to primary osteoarthritis (The HUNT Study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume 25 Issue 10 Pages 1654-1662  
  Keywords Hip joint replacement; Hormonal therapies; Knee joint replacement; Osteoarthritis; Reproductive history  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether parity, age at menarche, menopausal status, age at menopause, use of oral contraceptives (OC) or use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were associated with total knee replacement (TKR) or total hip replacement (THR) due to primary osteoarthritis. METHOD: In a prospective cohort study of 30,289 women from the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, data were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR) in order to identify TKR or THR due to primary osteoarthritis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: We observed 430 TKRs and 675 THRs during a mean follow-up time of 8.3 years. Increasing age at menarche was inversely associated with the risk of TKR (P-trend < 0.001). Past users and users of systemic HRT were at higher risk of TKR compared to never users (HR 1.42 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.90) and HR 1.40 (95% CI 1.03-1.90), respectively). No association was found between parity, age at menarche, menopausal status, age at menopause, oral contraceptive use or HRT use and THR. CONCLUSION: We found that increasing age at menarche reduced the risk of TKR. Past users and users of systemic HRT were at higher risk of TKR compared to never users. Parity did not increase the risk of THR or TKR.  
  Address The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28705605 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1925  
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Author Naicker, K.; Overland, S.; Johnson, J.A.; Manuel, D.; Skogen, J.C.; Sivertsen, B.; Colman, I. url  doi
  Title Symptoms of anxiety and depression in type 2 diabetes: Associations with clinical diabetes measures and self-management outcomes in the Norwegian HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology  
  Volume 84 Issue Pages 116-123  
  Keywords Anxiety; Depression; Diabetes self-management; Metabolic control; Type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine if symptoms of depression and anxiety are differentially associated with clinical diabetes measures and self-management behaviours in individuals with Type 2 diabetes, and whether these associations vary by patient sex. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis using data from 2035 adults with Type 2 diabetes in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore associations between symptoms of depression and anxiety and waist girth, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, c-reactive protein, glycemic control, diet adherence, exercise, glucose monitoring, foot checks for ulcers, and the subjective patient experience. Analyses were stratified by sex. RESULTS: Depression was associated with a lower likelihood of avoiding saturated fats (OR=0.20 [95% CI: 0.06, 0.68]) and increased odds of physical inactivity (OR=1.69 [95% CI: 1.37, 2.72]). Anxiety was associated with increased odds of eating vegetables (OR=1.66 [95% CI: 1.02, 2.73]), and an over two-fold increase of feeling that having diabetes is difficult. In women, anxiety was associated with elevated c-reactive protein levels (OR=1.57 [95% CI: 1.05, 2.34]). In men, depressive symptoms were associated with elevated HbA1c (OR=5.00 [95% CI: 1.15, 8.23). CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of depression and anxiety were differentially associated with some key diabetes-related measures. Our results suggest sex-specific differences with respect to two important clinical outcomes (i.e., anxiety and CRP in women and depression and glycemic control in men). These findings should alert practitioners to the importance of detection and management of psychological symptoms in individuals with Type 2 diabetes.  
  Address School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario Canada. Electronic address: icolman@uottawa.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28704763 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1962  
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Author Sardahaee, F.S.; Holmen, T.L.; Micali, N.; Kvaloy, K. url  doi
  Title Effects of single genetic variants and polygenic obesity risk scores on disordered eating in adolescents – The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite  
  Volume 118 Issue Pages 8-16  
  Keywords Adolescents; Comt; Disordered eating; Eat-12; Hunt; Obesity polygenic risk score  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Improving the understanding of the role of genetic risk on disordered eating (DE). METHODS: A case-control study including 1757 (F: 979, M: 778) adolescents (aged 13-19 years) from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), an ethnically homogenous Norwegian population based study. Cases and controls were defined using a shortened version of the Eating Attitude Test. Logistic regression was employed to test for associations between DE phenotypes and 24 obesity and eating disorder susceptibility SNPs, and the joint effect of a subset of these in a genetic risk score (GRS). RESULTS: COMT was shown to be associated with poor appetite/undereating (OR: 0.6, CI 95%: 0.43-0.83, p = 0.002). Independent of obesity associations, the weighted GRS was associated to overeating in 13-15 year old females (OR: 2.07, CI 95%: 1.14-3.76, p = 0.017). Additionally, a significant association was observed between the GRS and loss of control over eating in the total sample (OR: 1.62, CI 95%: 1.01-2.61, p = 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: The COMT variant (rs4680) was associated with poor appetite/undereating. Our study further confirms prior findings that obesity risk also confers risk for loss of control over eating; and overeating amongst girls.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Research and Development, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Health Trust, Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: kirsti.kvaloy@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-6663 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28694222 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1975  
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Author Thorstensen, K.; Kvitland, M.A.; Irgens, W.O.; Asberg, A.; Borch-Iohnsen, B.; Moen, T.; Hveem, K. url  doi
  Title Iron loading in HFE p.C282Y homozygotes found by population screening: relationships to HLA-type and T-lymphocyte subsets Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation Abbreviated Journal Scand J Clin Lab Invest  
  Volume 77 Issue 7 Pages 477-485  
  Keywords Hla-A*03; Haplotypes; Mhc; homozygote; iron overload  
  Abstract Iron loading in p.C282Y homozygous HFE hemochromatosis subjects is highly variable, and it is unclear what factors cause this variability. Finding such factors could aid in predicting which patients are at highest risk and require closest follow-up. The degree of iron loading has previously been associated with certain HLA-types and with abnormally low CD8 + cell counts in peripheral blood. In 183 Norwegian, p.C282Y homozygotes (104 men, 79 women) originally found through population screening we determined HLA type and measured total T-lymphocytes, CD4 + and CD8 + cells, and compared this with data on iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous men, but not in homozygous women, we found that the presence of two HLA-A*03 alleles increased the iron load on average by approximately 2-fold compared to p.C282Y homozygous men carrying zero or one A*03 allele. On the other hand, the presence of two HLA-A*01 alleles, in male subjects, apparently reduced the iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous individuals, the iron loading was increased if the CD8 + cell number was below the 25 percentile or if the CD4 + cell number was above the 75 percentile. This effect appeared to be additive to the effect of the number of HLA-A*03 alleles. Our data indicate that homozygosity for the HLA-A*03 allele significantly increases the risk of excessive iron loading in Norwegian p.C282Y homozygous male patients. In addition, low CD8 + cell number or high CD4 + cell number further increases the risk of excessive iron loading.  
  Address d HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28678636 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2013  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, chronic diseases and all-cause mortality in a population-based prospective cohort: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages e017256  
  Keywords 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D); all-cause mortality; chronic diseases; prospective cohort study; vitamin D  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of vitamin D status with all-cause mortality in a Norwegian population and the potential influences of existing chronic diseases on the association. DESIGN: A population-based prospective cohort study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample (n=6613) of adults aged 20 years or older in a cohort. METHODS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured in blood samples collected at baseline (n=6377). Mortality was ascertained from the Norwegian National Registry. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the HRs with 95% CIs for all-cause mortality in association with serum 25(OH)D levels after adjustment for a wide spectrum of confounding factors as well as chronic diseases at baseline. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 18.5 years, during which 1539 subjects died. The HRs for all-cause mortality associated with the first quartile level of 25(OH)D (<34.5 nmol/L) as compared with the fourth quartile (>/=58.1 nmol/L) before and after adjustment for chronic diseases at baseline were 1.30 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.51) and 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), respectively. In the subjects without chronic diseases at baseline and with further exclusion of the first 3 years of follow-up, the corresponding adjusted HR was 1.34 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.66). CONCLUSIONS: Low serum 25(OH)D level was associated with increased all-cause mortality in a general Norwegian population. The association was not notably influenced by existing chronic diseases.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28674149; PMCID:PMC5734252 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1990  
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Author Hoff, M.; Meyer, H.E.; Skurtveit, S.; Langhammer, A.; Sogaard, A.J.; Syversen, U.; Dhainaut, A.; Skovlund, E.; Abrahamsen, B.; Schei, B. url  doi
  Title Validation of FRAX and the impact of self-reported falls among elderly in a general population: the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA Abbreviated Journal Osteoporos Int  
  Volume 28 Issue 10 Pages 2935-2944  
  Keywords Fracture risk assessment; General population studies; Hunt; Osteoporosis  
  Abstract Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) without bone mineral density (BMD) for hip fracture prediction was validated in a Norwegian population 50-90 years. Fracture risk increased with higher FRAX score, and the observed number of hip fractures agreed well with the predicted number, except for the youngest and oldest men. Self-reported fall was an independent risk factor for fracture in women. INTRODUCTION: The primary aim was to validate FRAX without BMD for hip fracture prediction in a Norwegian population of men and women 50-90 years. Secondary, to study whether information of falls could improve prediction of fractures in the subgroup aged 70-90 years. METHODS: Data were obtained from the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3), the fracture registry in Nord-Trondelag, and the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD), including 15,432 women and 13,585 men. FRAX hip without BMD was calculated, and hip fractures were registered for a median follow-up of 5.2 years. The number of estimated and observed fractures was assessed, ROC curves with area under the curve (AUC), and Cox regression analyses. For the group aged 70-90 years, self-reported falls the last year before HUNT3 were included in the Cox regression model. RESULTS: The risk of fracture increased with higher FRAX score. When FRAX groups were categorized in a 10-year percentage risk for hip fracture as follows, <4, 4-7.9, 8-11.9, and >/=12%, the hazard ratio (HR) for hip fracture between the lowest and the highest group was 17.80 (95% CI: 12.86-24.65) among women and 23.40 (13.93-39.30) in men. Observed number of hip fractures agreed quite well with the predicted number, except for the youngest and oldest men. AUC was 0.81 (0.78-0.83) for women and 0.79 (0.76-0.83) for men. Self-reported fall was an independent risk factor for fracture in women (HR 1.64, 1.20-2.24), and among men, this was not significant (1.09, 0.65-1.83). CONCLUSIONS: FRAX without BMD predicted hip fracture reasonably well. In the age group 70-90 years, falls seemed to imply an additional risk among women.  
  Address Department of Gynecology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0937-941X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28668994 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1930  
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Author Modalsli, E.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Snekvik, I.; Romundstad, P.R.; Naldi, L.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title The association between the clinical diversity of psoriasis and depressive symptoms: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV Abbreviated Journal J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol  
  Volume 31 Issue 12 Pages 2062-2068  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: While a number of observational hospital-based studies have reported an association between psoriasis and depression, less is known about the clinical diversity of psoriasis and depressive symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations of inverse psoriasis, psoriasis severity and psoriasis duration with depressive symptoms in a general population. METHODS: We linked data from the population-based third Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3) to the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD) and Statistics Norway. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Associations between psoriasis and depressive symptoms (HADS >/= 8) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Among 37 833 participants in HUNT3, we found a weak association between any psoriasis and the prevalence of depressive symptoms [fully adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-1.28]. The association with depressive symptoms was stronger when psoriasis was characterized by inverse anatomical distribution (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.02-1.70), requirement of systemic psoriasis medication (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.00-2.17) or long disease duration (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.09-1.64). Conversely, when there was no inverse psoriasis distribution, no requirement of systemic medication, or shorter disease duration, psoriasis was not meaningfully associated with depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION: Overall, depressive symptoms do not seem to be a major concern among subjects with psoriasis in a general Norwegian population. However, among subjects with inverse anatomical distribution, requirement of systemic psoriasis medication or long disease duration, depressive symptoms may be particularly important to address when evaluating the burden of psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0926-9959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28662282 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1956  
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Author Torske, M.O.; Krokstad, S.; Stamatakis, E.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Dog ownership and all-cause mortality in a population cohort in Norway: The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179832  
  Keywords Adult; Animals; *Cause of Death; Cohort Studies; Dogs; Exercise; Female; Health Status; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortality; Norway/epidemiology; *Ownership; *Population Surveillance; Walking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has been increased interest in human-animal interactions and their possible effects on human health. Some of this research has focused on human physical activity levels, mediated through increased dog walking. Much of the reported research has been cross sectional, and very few epidemiological studies have examined the association between dog ownership and mortality in populations. METHODS: We used data from the Norwegian county population-based Nord-Trondelag HUNT Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to analyse the relationship between dog ownership and all-cause mortality. The median follow-up time was 18.5 years and the maximum follow-up time was 19.7 years. RESULTS: In this population, dog owners were no more physically active than non-dog owners, both groups reporting a total of just over 3 hours/week of light and vigorous activity. Dog owners (n = 25,031, with 1,587 deaths during follow-up; 504,017 person-years of time at risk) had virtually the same hazard of dying as non-dog owners (Hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence for an association between the presence of a dog in the household and all-cause mortality or physical activity levels in this Norwegian population. Further epidemiological research is needed to clarify this relationship, as methodological limitations and an active Norwegian population sample means that generalizable evidence is not yet clear on dog ownership and mortality.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28662069; PMCID:PMC5491039 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2014  
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Author Paulsen, J.; Askim, A.; Mohus, R.M.; Mehl, A.; Dewan, A.; Solligard, E.; Damas, J.K.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Associations of obesity and lifestyle with the risk and mortality of bloodstream infection in a general population: a 15-year follow-up of 64 027 individuals in the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 1573-1581  
  Keywords Bacteraemia; alcohol drinking; exercise; obesity; sepsis; smoking  
  Abstract Background: Bloodstream infections (BSI) cause considerable morbidity and mortality, and primary prevention should be a priority. Lifestyle factors are of particular interest since they represent a modifiable target. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study among participants in the population-based Norwegian HUNT2 Survey, where 64 027 participants were followed from 1995-97 through 2011 by linkage to prospectively recorded information on BSI at local and regional hospitals. The exposures were: baseline body mass index (BMI) measurements; and self-reported smoking habits, leisure time physical activity and alcohol intake. The outcomes were hazard ratios (HR) of BSI and BSI mortality. Results: During 810 453 person-years and median follow-up of 14.8 years, 1844 (2.9%) participants experienced at least one BSI and 396 (0.62%) died from BSI. Compared with normal weight participants (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), the age- and sex-adjusted risk of a first-time BSI was 31% [95% confidence interval (CI) 14-51%] higher at BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m2, 87% (95% CI 50-135%) higher at BMI 35.0-39.9 kg/m2 and 210% (95% CI 117-341%) higher at BMI >/= 40.0 kg/m2. The risk of BSI mortality was similarly increased. Compared with never-smokers, current smokers had 51% (95% CI 34-70%) and 75% (95% CI 34-129%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively. Physically inactive participants had 71% (95% CI 42-107%) and 108% (95% CI 37-216%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively, compared with the most physically active. Conclusions: Obesity, smoking and physical inactivity carry increased risk of BSI and BSI mortality.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28637260 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1969  
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Author Vie, G.A.; Pape, K.; Krokstad, S.; Johnsen, R.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Temporal changes in health within 5 years before and after disability pension-the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Eur J Public Health  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 653-659  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Health status has been reported to change before, during and after disability pension receipt. These associations might be subject to temporal changes according to changes in policy, incidence of disability pensions and other contextual factors. We compared the perceived health around time of disability retirement among persons receiving disability pension in the 1990 s and 2000 s in Norway. Methods: We linked data from two consecutive cross-sectional population based Norwegian health surveys, HUNT2 (1995-97) and HUNT3 (2006-08), to national registries, identifying those who received disability pension within 5 years before or after participation in the survey (HUNT2: n = 5362, HUNT3: n = 4649). We used logistic regression to assess associations of time from receiving a disability pension with self-rated health, insomnia, depression and anxiety symptoms and subsequently estimated adjusted prevalence over time. Results: Prevalence of poor self-rated health peaked around time of receiving disability pension in both decades. For those aged 50+, prevalence the year before disability pension was slightly lower in 2006-08 (74%, 95% CI 70-79%) than in 1995-97 (83%, 95% CI 79-87%), whereas peak prevalence was similar between surveys for those younger than 50. Depression symptoms peaked more pronouncedly in 1995-97 than in 2006-08, whereas prevalence of anxiety symptoms was similar at time of receiving disability pension between surveys. Conclusions: We found no strong evidence of differences in health selection to disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s. However, we found indication of less depression symptoms around time of disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s.  
  Address Forensic Department and Research Centre Broset, St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1101-1262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28637220 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2002  
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Author Haug, E.B.; Horn, J.; Fraser, A.; Markovitz, A.R.; Rich-Edwards, J.W.; Davey Smith, G.; Romundstad, P.R.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Pre-pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal Am J Hypertens  
  Volume 30 Issue 9 Pages e7-e8  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0895-7061 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28633300 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1923  
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Author Retnakaran, R.; Wen, S.W.; Tan, H.; Zhou, S.; Ye, C.; Shen, M.; Smith, G.N.; Walker, M.C. url  doi
  Title Response to Pre-Pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal Am J Hypertens  
  Volume 30 Issue 9 Pages e9  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0895-7061 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28633294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1973  
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Author Grov, E.K.; Fossa, S.D.; Dahl, A.A. url  doi
  Title A controlled study of the influence of comorbidity on activities of daily living in elderly cancer survivors (the HUNT-3 survey) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Geriatric Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Geriatr Oncol  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 328-335  
  Keywords Adl; Activities of daily living; Cancer survivors; Comorbidity; Elderly; Home dwelling  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine the influence of somatic comorbidity on Activity of Daily Living (ADL) problems in cancer survivors >/=70years (ECSs) based on data from The Health Study of Nord-Trondelag County (HUNT-3) 2006-08. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Among participants of the HUNT-3 survey, 599 ECSs had a diagnosis of one invasive cancer according to both The Cancer Registry of Norway and self-report. Three controls without cancer aged >/=70years for each ECS were drawn from the HUNT-3 sample. We compared personal-ADL (P-ADL) and instrumental-ADL (I-ADL) problems for ECSs and differences between ADL problems for ECSs with and without comorbidity and controls with and without comorbidity. RESULTS: The prevalence of P-ADL problems was 3.5% among ECSs and 2.9% among controls (p=0.97) and for I-ADL 28.5% versus 21.4% (p=0.01), respectively. In bivariate analyses where ECSs versus controls was the dependent variable, presence of I-ADL problems, higher age, being female, paired relationship, poor self-rated health, hospitalization last year, and low level of neuroticism were associated being ECSs. In multivariate analyses, these variables, except I-ADL-problems and paired relationship, remained significantly associated being ECSs. No significant differences were shown for P-ADL problems when comparing ECSs and controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with and without comorbidity. ECSs with comorbidity reported significantly more I-ADL-problems than controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with comorbidity had significantly more I-ADL-problems than ECSs without comorbidity. CONCLUSION: Our results reflect common factors found in ADL studies in the elderly population. Health personnel have to be particularly observant on I-ADL problems among female ECSs, and those reporting poor self-rated health or comorbidity.  
  Address National Advisory Unit on Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1879-4068 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28629695 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1917  
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Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Vie, G.A.; Janszky, I.; Vatten, L.J. url  doi
  Title Reply to Letter to the editor “Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT Study” Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 242 Issue Pages 8  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway; Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28619354 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1882  
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Author Safiri, S.; Ayubi, E. url  doi
  Title Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT study Type Comment
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 242 Issue Pages 7  
  Keywords *Cardiovascular Diseases; Humans; Norway; Risk Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: aubi65@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28619353 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1974  
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Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers are not independently associated with MI risk in healthy individuals – results from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 243 Issue Pages 502-504  
  Keywords Leukocyte markers; Myocardial infarction  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that circulating markers reflecting monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. METHODS: Serum monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers soluble (s) CD163, sCD14, Gal3BP, sCD25 and sCD166 were analyzed by enzyme-immunoassay in a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. Among 58,761 apparently healthy men and women followed a median 11.3years, 1587 incident MI cases were registered, and compared to 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. RESULTS: Higher serum sCD163 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.27, P-trend 0.002), sCD14 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.38, P-trend<0.001), and especially sCD25 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.45, P-trend<0.001), were associated with increased MI risk in the age-and sex adjusted models. However, after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors these associations were strongly attenuated (Q4 vs Q1 ORs between 1.02 and 1.12, P-trends between 0.30 and 0.58). CONCLUSIONS: sCD163, sCD14 and sCD25 may reflect leukocyte activation and inflammatory mechanisms related to atherogenesis, but do not predict MI risk above and beyond conventional cardiovascular risk factors.  
  Address Department of Public Health, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28615143 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2016  
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Author Scelo, G.; Purdue, M.P.; Brown, K.M.; Johansson, M.; Wang, Z.; Eckel-Passow, J.E.; Ye, Y.; Hofmann, J.N.; Choi, J.; Foll, M.; Gaborieau, V.; Machiela, M.J.; Colli, L.M.; Li, P.; Sampson, J.N.; Abedi-Ardekani, B.; Besse, C.; Blanche, H.; Boland, A.; Burdette, L.; Chabrier, A.; Durand, G.; Le Calvez-Kelm, F.; Prokhortchouk, E.; Robinot, N.; Skryabin, K.G.; Wozniak, M.B.; Yeager, M.; Basta-Jovanovic, G.; Dzamic, Z.; Foretova, L.; Holcatova, I.; Janout, V.; Mates, D.; Mukeriya, A.; Rascu, S.; Zaridze, D.; Bencko, V.; Cybulski, C.; Fabianova, E.; Jinga, V.; Lissowska, J.; Lubinski, J.; Navratilova, M.; Rudnai, P.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Benhamou, S.; Cancel-Tassin, G.; Cussenot, O.; Baglietto, L.; Boeing, H.; Khaw, K.-T.; Weiderpass, E.; Ljungberg, B.; Sitaram, R.T.; Bruinsma, F.; Jordan, S.J.; Severi, G.; Winship, I.; Hveem, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Fletcher, T.; Koppova, K.; Larsson, S.C.; Wolk, A.; Banks, R.E.; Selby, P.J.; Easton, D.F.; Pharoah, P.; Andreotti, G.; Freeman, L.E.B.; Koutros, S.; Albanes, D.; Mannisto, S.; Weinstein, S.; Clark, P.E.; Edwards, T.L.; Lipworth, L.; Gapstur, S.M.; Stevens, V.L.; Carol, H.; Freedman, M.L.; Pomerantz, M.M.; Cho, E.; Kraft, P.; Preston, M.A.; Wilson, K.M.; Michael Gaziano, J.; Sesso, H.D.; Black, A.; Freedman, N.D.; Huang, W.-Y.; Anema, J.G.; Kahnoski, R.J.; Lane, B.R.; Noyes, S.L.; Petillo, D.; Teh, B.T.; Peters, U.; White, E.; Anderson, G.L.; Johnson, L.; Luo, J.; Buring, J.; Lee, I.-M.; Chow, W.-H.; Moore, L.E.; Wood, C.; Eisen, T.; Henrion, M.; Larkin, J.; Barman, P.; Leibovich, B.C.; Choueiri, T.K.; Mark Lathrop, G.; Rothman, N.; Deleuze, J.-F.; McKay, J.D.; Parker, A.S.; Wu, X.; Houlston, R.S.; Brennan, P.; Chanock, S.J. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide association study identifies multiple risk loci for renal cell carcinoma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Communications Abbreviated Journal Nat Commun  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 15724  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified six risk loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We conducted a meta-analysis of two new scans of 5,198 cases and 7,331 controls together with four existing scans, totalling 10,784 cases and 20,406 controls of European ancestry. Twenty-four loci were tested in an additional 3,182 cases and 6,301 controls. We confirm the six known RCC risk loci and identify seven new loci at 1p32.3 (rs4381241, P=3.1 x 10(-10)), 3p22.1 (rs67311347, P=2.5 x 10(-8)), 3q26.2 (rs10936602, P=8.8 x 10(-9)), 8p21.3 (rs2241261, P=5.8 x 10(-9)), 10q24.33-q25.1 (rs11813268, P=3.9 x 10(-8)), 11q22.3 (rs74911261, P=2.1 x 10(-10)) and 14q24.2 (rs4903064, P=2.2 x 10(-24)). Expression quantitative trait analyses suggest plausible candidate genes at these regions that may contribute to RCC susceptibility.  
  Address Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28598434; PMCID:PMC5472706 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1976  
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Author Nordstoga, A.L.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Vasseljen, O.; Unsgaard-Tondel, M.; Mork, P.J. url  doi
  Title The influence of multisite pain and psychological comorbidity on prognosis of chronic low back pain: longitudinal data from the Norwegian HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e015312  
  Keywords back pain; epidemiology; musculoskeletal disorders; spine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the prospective influence of multisite pain, depression, anxiety, self-rated health and pain-related disability on recovery from chronic low back pain (LBP). SETTING: The data is derived from the second (1995-1997) and third (2006-2008) wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: The study population comprises 4484 women and 3039 men in the Norwegian HUNT Study who reported chronic LBP at baseline in 1995-1997. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was recovery from chronic LBP at the 11-year follow-up. Persons not reporting pain and/or stiffness for at least three consecutive months during the last year were defined as recovered. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios (RRs) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: At follow-up, 1822 (40.6%) women and 1578 (51.9%) men reported recovery from chronic LBP. The probability of recovery was inversely associated with number of pain sites (P-trend<0.001). Compared with reporting 2-3 pain sites, persons with only LBP had a slightly higher probability of recovery (RR 1.10, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.22 in women and RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.21 in men), whereas people reporting 6-9 pain sites had substantially lower probability of recovery (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.63 in women and RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.79 in men). Poor/not so good self-rated general health, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and pain-related disability in work and leisure were all associated with reduced probability of recovery, but there was no statistical interaction between multisite pain and these comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing number of pain sites was inversely associated with recovery from chronic LBP. In addition, factors such as poor self-rated health, psychological symptoms and pain-related disability may further reduce the probability of recovery from chronic LBP.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28592580; PMCID:PMC5734202 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1967  
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Author Cai, Y.; Hansell, A.L.; Blangiardo, M.; Burton, P.R.; de Hoogh, K.; Doiron, D.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; Hveem, K.; Mbatchou, S.; Morley, D.W.; Stolk, R.P.; Zijlema, W.L.; Elliott, P.; Hodgson, S. url  doi
  Title Long-term exposure to road traffic noise, ambient air pollution, and cardiovascular risk factors in the HUNT and lifelines cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume 38 Issue 29 Pages 2290-2296  
  Keywords Air pollution; Blood glucose; Blood lipids; Systemic inflammation; Traffic noise  
  Abstract Aims: Blood biochemistry may provide information on associations between road traffic noise, air pollution, and cardiovascular disease risk. We evaluated this in two large European cohorts (HUNT3, Lifelines). Methods and results: Road traffic noise exposure was modelled for 2009 using a simplified version of the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU). Annual ambient air pollution (PM10, NO2) at residence was estimated for 2007 using a Land Use Regression model. The statistical platform DataSHIELD was used to pool data from 144 082 participants aged >/=20 years to enable individual-level analysis. Generalized linear models were fitted to assess cross-sectional associations between pollutants and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), blood lipids and for (Lifelines only) fasting blood glucose, for samples taken during recruitment in 2006-2013. Pooling both cohorts, an inter-quartile range (IQR) higher day-time noise (5.1 dB(A)) was associated with 1.1% [95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.02-2.2%)] higher hsCRP, 0.7% (95% CI: 0.3-1.1%) higher triglycerides, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.3-0.7%) higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL); only the association with HDL was robust to adjustment for air pollution. An IQR higher PM10 (2.0 microg/m3) or NO2 (7.4 microg/m3) was associated with higher triglycerides (1.9%, 95% CI: 1.5-2.4% and 2.2%, 95% CI: 1.6-2.7%), independent of adjustment for noise. Additionally for NO2, a significant association with hsCRP (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.5-3.3%) was seen. In Lifelines, an IQR higher noise (4.2 dB(A)) and PM10 (2.4 microg/m3) was associated with 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.3%) and 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4-0.7%) higher fasting glucose respectively, with both remaining robust to adjustment for air/noise pollution. Conclusion: Long-term exposures to road traffic noise and ambient air pollution were associated with blood biochemistry, providing a possible link between road traffic noise/air pollution and cardio-metabolic disease risk.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, W2 1PG, London, UK  
  Corporate Author BioSHaRE Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28575405 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1895  
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Author Gabin, J.M.; Tambs, K.; Saltvedt, I.; Sund, E.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Abbreviated Journal Alzheimers Res Ther  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 37  
  Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Asymptomatic Diseases/*epidemiology; Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data; Comorbidity; Dementia/diagnosis/epidemiology; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*diagnostic imaging/*epidemiology; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sex Distribution; Alzheimer disease; Blood pressure; Epidemiology; Prospective case cohort; Risk factors; Vascular dementia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. METHODS: In Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. RESULTS: Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in individuals over the age of 60 years. We cannot exclude a survival effect, however. Among middle-aged subjects (<60 years), elevated systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were associated with eventual Alzheimer disease in individuals who reported using antihypertensive medication.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1758-9193 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28569205; PMCID:PMC5452294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1900  
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Author Skaaby, T.; Taylor, A.E.; Jacobsen, R.K.; Paternoster, L.; Thuesen, B.H.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Larsen, S.C.; Zhou, A.; Wong, A.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Flexeder, C.; Mannisto, S.; Hardy, R.; Kuh, D.; Barry, S.J.; Tang Mollehave, L.; Cerqueira, C.; Friedrich, N.; Bonten, T.N.; Noordam, R.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Taube, C.; Jessen, L.E.; McConnachie, A.; Sattar, N.; Upton, M.N.; McSharry, C.; Bonnelykke, K.; Bisgaard, H.; Schulz, H.; Strauch, K.; Meitinger, T.; Peters, A.; Grallert, H.; Nohr, E.A.; Kivimaki, M.; Kumari, M.; Volker, U.; Nauck, M.; Volzke, H.; Power, C.; Hypponen, E.; Hansen, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Salomaa, V.; Grarup, N.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.R.; Skorpen, F.; Kaprio, J.; R Munafo, M.; Linneberg, A. url  doi
  Title Investigating the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA consortium Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2224  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.61, 0.76; P < 0.001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.86; P < 0.001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.09; P = 0.967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0.958, 95% CI: 0.920, 0.998; P = 0.041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.02; P = 0.117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.11; P = 0.020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.  
  Address Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title