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Author Haug, E.B.; Horn, J.; Fraser, A.; Markovitz, A.R.; Rich-Edwards, J.W.; Davey Smith, G.; Romundstad, P.R.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Pre-pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal Am J Hypertens  
  Volume (down) 30 Issue 9 Pages e7-e8  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0895-7061 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28633300 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1923  
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Author Retnakaran, R.; Wen, S.W.; Tan, H.; Zhou, S.; Ye, C.; Shen, M.; Smith, G.N.; Walker, M.C. url  doi
  Title Response to Pre-Pregnancy Blood Pressure and Offspring Sex in the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication American Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal Am J Hypertens  
  Volume (down) 30 Issue 9 Pages e9  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0895-7061 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28633294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1973  
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Author Bosnes, I.; Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Stordal, E.; Romild, U.; Nordahl, H.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and correlates of successful aging in a population-based sample of older adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Psychogeriatrics Abbreviated Journal Int Psychogeriatr  
  Volume (down) 29 Issue 3 Pages 431-440  
  Keywords Hunt; components; correlates; prevalence; successful aging  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The factors influencing successful aging (SA) are of great interest in an aging society. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of SA, the relative importance across age of the three components used to define it (absence of disease and disability, high cognitive and physical function, and active engagement with life), and its correlates. METHODS: Data were extracted from the population-based cross-sectional Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3 2006-2008). Individuals aged 70-89 years with complete datasets for the three components were included (N = 5773 of 8,040, 71.8%). Of the respondents, 54.6% were women. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to analyze possible correlates of SA. RESULTS: Overall, 35.6% of the sample met one of the three criteria, 34.1% met combinations, and 14.5% met all of the three criteria. The most demanding criterion was high function, closely followed by absence of disease, while approximately two-thirds were actively engaged in life. The relative change with age was largest for the high cognitive and physical function component and smallest for active engagement with life. The significant correlates of SA were younger age, female gender, higher education, weekly exercise, more satisfaction with life, non-smoking, and alcohol consumption, whereas marital status was not related to SA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of SA in this study (14.5%) is comparable to previous studies. It may be possible to increase the prevalence by intervention directed toward more exercise, non-smoking, and better satisfaction with life.  
  Address Department of Psychology,Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU),Trondheim,Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1041-6102 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27852332 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1886  
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Author Hoff, M.; Meyer, H.E.; Skurtveit, S.; Langhammer, A.; Sogaard, A.J.; Syversen, U.; Dhainaut, A.; Skovlund, E.; Abrahamsen, B.; Schei, B. url  doi
  Title Validation of FRAX and the impact of self-reported falls among elderly in a general population: the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA Abbreviated Journal Osteoporos Int  
  Volume (down) 28 Issue 10 Pages 2935-2944  
  Keywords Fracture risk assessment; General population studies; Hunt; Osteoporosis  
  Abstract Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) without bone mineral density (BMD) for hip fracture prediction was validated in a Norwegian population 50-90 years. Fracture risk increased with higher FRAX score, and the observed number of hip fractures agreed well with the predicted number, except for the youngest and oldest men. Self-reported fall was an independent risk factor for fracture in women. INTRODUCTION: The primary aim was to validate FRAX without BMD for hip fracture prediction in a Norwegian population of men and women 50-90 years. Secondary, to study whether information of falls could improve prediction of fractures in the subgroup aged 70-90 years. METHODS: Data were obtained from the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3), the fracture registry in Nord-Trondelag, and the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD), including 15,432 women and 13,585 men. FRAX hip without BMD was calculated, and hip fractures were registered for a median follow-up of 5.2 years. The number of estimated and observed fractures was assessed, ROC curves with area under the curve (AUC), and Cox regression analyses. For the group aged 70-90 years, self-reported falls the last year before HUNT3 were included in the Cox regression model. RESULTS: The risk of fracture increased with higher FRAX score. When FRAX groups were categorized in a 10-year percentage risk for hip fracture as follows, <4, 4-7.9, 8-11.9, and >/=12%, the hazard ratio (HR) for hip fracture between the lowest and the highest group was 17.80 (95% CI: 12.86-24.65) among women and 23.40 (13.93-39.30) in men. Observed number of hip fractures agreed quite well with the predicted number, except for the youngest and oldest men. AUC was 0.81 (0.78-0.83) for women and 0.79 (0.76-0.83) for men. Self-reported fall was an independent risk factor for fracture in women (HR 1.64, 1.20-2.24), and among men, this was not significant (1.09, 0.65-1.83). CONCLUSIONS: FRAX without BMD predicted hip fracture reasonably well. In the age group 70-90 years, falls seemed to imply an additional risk among women.  
  Address Department of Gynecology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0937-941X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28668994 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1930  
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Author Vie, G.A.; Pape, K.; Krokstad, S.; Johnsen, R.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Temporal changes in health within 5 years before and after disability pension-the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Eur J Public Health  
  Volume (down) 27 Issue 4 Pages 653-659  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Health status has been reported to change before, during and after disability pension receipt. These associations might be subject to temporal changes according to changes in policy, incidence of disability pensions and other contextual factors. We compared the perceived health around time of disability retirement among persons receiving disability pension in the 1990 s and 2000 s in Norway. Methods: We linked data from two consecutive cross-sectional population based Norwegian health surveys, HUNT2 (1995-97) and HUNT3 (2006-08), to national registries, identifying those who received disability pension within 5 years before or after participation in the survey (HUNT2: n = 5362, HUNT3: n = 4649). We used logistic regression to assess associations of time from receiving a disability pension with self-rated health, insomnia, depression and anxiety symptoms and subsequently estimated adjusted prevalence over time. Results: Prevalence of poor self-rated health peaked around time of receiving disability pension in both decades. For those aged 50+, prevalence the year before disability pension was slightly lower in 2006-08 (74%, 95% CI 70-79%) than in 1995-97 (83%, 95% CI 79-87%), whereas peak prevalence was similar between surveys for those younger than 50. Depression symptoms peaked more pronouncedly in 1995-97 than in 2006-08, whereas prevalence of anxiety symptoms was similar at time of receiving disability pension between surveys. Conclusions: We found no strong evidence of differences in health selection to disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s. However, we found indication of less depression symptoms around time of disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s.  
  Address Forensic Department and Research Centre Broset, St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1101-1262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28637220 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2002  
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Author Islam, M.K.; Folland, S.; Kaarboe, O.M. url  doi
  Title Social capital and cigarette smoking: New empirics featuring the Norwegian HUNT data Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Economics and Human Biology Abbreviated Journal Econ Hum Biol  
  Volume (down) 26 Issue Pages 174-185  
  Keywords *Cigarette smoking; *Instrumental variables; *Longitudinal data; *Social capital  
  Abstract Using a rich Norwegian longitudinal data set, this study explores the effects of different social capital variables on the probability of cigarette smoking. There are four social capital variables available in two waves of our data set. Our results based on probit (and OLS) analyses (with municipality fixed-effects) show that the likelihood of smoking participation is negatively and significantly associated with social capital attributes, namely, community trust (-0.017), participation in organizational activities (-0.032), and cohabitation (-0.045). Significant negative associations were also observed in panel data, pooled OLS, and random effects models for community trust (-0.024; -0.010) and cohabitation (-0.040; -0.032). Fixed-effects models also showed significant negative effects for cohabitation (-0.018). Estimates of alternative instrumental variables (IV) based on recursive bivariate probit and IV-GMM models also confirmed negative and significant effects for three of its characteristics: cohabitation (-0.030; -0.046), community trust (-0.065; -0.075), and participation in organizational activities (-0.035; -0.046). The limitations of our conclusions are discussed, and the significance of our study for the field of social capital and health is described, along with suggested avenues for future research.  
  Address Department of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, 0373 Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1570-677X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28448881 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1931  
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Author Yu, D.; Takata, Y.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Blot, W.; Sawada, N.; White, E.; Freedman, N.; Robien, K.; Giovannucci, E.; Zhang, X.; Park, Y.; Gao, Y.-T.; Chlebowski, R.T.; Langhammer, A.; Yang, G.; Severi, G.; Manjer, J.; Khaw, K.-T.; Weiderpass, E.; Liao, L.M.; Caporaso, N.; Krokstad, S.; Hveem, K.; Sinha, R.; Ziegler, R.; Tsugane, S.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Johansson, M.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O. url  doi
  Title Prediagnostic Calcium Intake and Lung Cancer Survival: A Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume (down) 26 Issue 7 Pages 1060-1070  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. Little is known about whether prediagnostic nutritional factors may affect survival. We examined the associations of prediagnostic calcium intake from foods and/or supplements with lung cancer survival.Methods: The present analysis included 23,882 incident, primary lung cancer patients from 12 prospective cohort studies. Dietary calcium intake was assessed using food-frequency questionnaires at baseline in each cohort and standardized to caloric intake of 2,000 kcal/d for women and 2,500 kcal/d for men. Stratified, multivariable-adjusted Cox regression was applied to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: The 5-year survival rates were 56%, 21%, and 5.7% for localized, regional, and distant stage lung cancer, respectively. Low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake (<500-600 mg/d, less than half of the recommendation) was associated with a small increase in risk of death compared with recommended calcium intakes (800-1,200 mg/d); HR (95% CI) was 1.07 (1.01-1.13) after adjusting for age, stage, histology, grade, smoking status, pack-years, and other potential prognostic factors. The association between low calcium intake and higher lung cancer mortality was evident primarily among localized/regional stage patients, with HR (95% CI) of 1.15 (1.04-1.27). No association was found for supplemental calcium with survival in the multivariable-adjusted model.Conclusions: This large pooled analysis is the first, to our knowledge, to indicate that low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake may be associated with poorer survival among early-stage lung cancer patients.Impact: This multinational prospective study linked low calcium intake to lung cancer prognosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1060-70. (c)2017 AACR.  
  Address Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. xiao-ou.shu@vanderbilt.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28264875; PMCID:PMC5500413 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2025  
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Nordsletten, L.; Johnsen, M.B.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Age of menarche is associated with knee joint replacement due to primary osteoarthritis (The HUNT Study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume (down) 25 Issue 10 Pages 1654-1662  
  Keywords Hip joint replacement; Hormonal therapies; Knee joint replacement; Osteoarthritis; Reproductive history  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether parity, age at menarche, menopausal status, age at menopause, use of oral contraceptives (OC) or use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were associated with total knee replacement (TKR) or total hip replacement (THR) due to primary osteoarthritis. METHOD: In a prospective cohort study of 30,289 women from the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, data were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR) in order to identify TKR or THR due to primary osteoarthritis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: We observed 430 TKRs and 675 THRs during a mean follow-up time of 8.3 years. Increasing age at menarche was inversely associated with the risk of TKR (P-trend < 0.001). Past users and users of systemic HRT were at higher risk of TKR compared to never users (HR 1.42 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.90) and HR 1.40 (95% CI 1.03-1.90), respectively). No association was found between parity, age at menarche, menopausal status, age at menopause, oral contraceptive use or HRT use and THR. CONCLUSION: We found that increasing age at menarche reduced the risk of TKR. Past users and users of systemic HRT were at higher risk of TKR compared to never users. Parity did not increase the risk of THR or TKR.  
  Address The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28705605 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1925  
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Nordsletten, L.; Johnsen, M.B.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Corrigendum to “Age of menarche is associated with knee joint replacement due to primary osteoarthritis (The HUNT Study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register)” [Osteoarthr Cartil 25 (2017) 1654-1662] Type Published Erratum
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume (down) 25 Issue 12 Pages 2148-2149  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29066295 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1926  
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Author Johnsen, M.B.; Vie, G.A.; Winsvold, B.S.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Pedersen, L.M.; Hellevik, A.I.; Langhammer, A.; Furnes, O.; Flugsrud, G.B.; Skorpen, F.; Romundstad, P.R.; Storheim, K.; Nordsletten, L.; Zwart, J.A. url  doi
  Title The causal role of smoking on the risk of hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis: a Mendelian randomisation analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume (down) 25 Issue 6 Pages 817-823  
  Keywords Epidemiology; Genetic variants; Osteoarthritis; Smoking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Smoking has been associated with a reduced risk of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and subsequent joint replacement. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the observed association is likely to be causal. METHOD: 55,745 participants of a population-based cohort were genotyped for the rs1051730 C > T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), a proxy for smoking quantity among smokers. A Mendelian randomization analysis was performed using rs1051730 as an instrument to evaluate the causal role of smoking on the risk of hip or knee replacement (combined as total joint replacement (TJR)). Association between rs1051730 T alleles and TJR was estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All analyses were adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: Smoking quantity (no. of cigarettes) was inversely associated with TJR (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.97-0.98). In the Mendelian randomization analysis, rs1051730 T alleles were associated with reduced risk of TJR among current smokers (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, per T allele), however we found no evidence of association among former (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88-1.07) and never smokers (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.89-1.06). Neither adjusting for body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular disease (CVD) nor accounting for the competing risk of mortality substantially changed the results. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that smoking may be causally associated with the reduced risk of TJR. Our findings add support to the inverse association found in previous observational studies. More research is needed to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms of this causal association.  
  Address Communication and Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Disorders, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: j.a.zwart@medisin.uio.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28049019 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1934  
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Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Extracellular matrix markers and risk of myocardial infarction: The HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol  
  Volume (down) 24 Issue 11 Pages 1161-1167  
  Keywords Extracellular matrix; Ykl-40; case-control; myocardial infarction  
  Abstract Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling may influence atherosclerotic progression and plaque stability. We hypothesized that evaluation of extracellular matrix markers, with potentially different roles during atherogenesis, could provide information on underlying mechanisms and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. A total of 58,761 men and women, free of known cardiovascular disease, were followed for a first MI. During 11.3 years of follow-up, 1587 incident MIs were registered, and these cases were compared with 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. Circulating levels of the ECM proteins CD147 (ECM metalloproteinase inducer; EMMPRIN), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP: thrombospondin-5) and YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like-1) were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Results We found an inverse association between COMP (quartile (Q) 4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.98)) and YKL-40 (Q4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.77 (0.62-0.95)) with incidence of MI after full multivariable adjustment. Serum CD147 was not associated with MI risk in adjusted analysis. Conclusion High levels of COMP and YKL-40 were associated with lower risk of incident MI, suggesting a potential beneficial role in promoting plaque stability in individuals without incident cardiovascular disease.  
  Address 12 Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-4873 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28429960 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1999  
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Author Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume (down) 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Johnsen, M.B.; Langhammer, A.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Nordsletten, L. url  doi
  Title Incidence of total hip or knee replacement due to osteoarthritis in relation to thyroid function: a prospective cohort study (The Nord-Trondelag Health Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders Abbreviated Journal BMC Musculoskelet Disord  
  Volume (down) 18 Issue 1 Pages 201  
  Keywords Hip joint replacement; Knee joint replacement; Osteoarthritis; Thyroid function; Thyroid stimulating hormone  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To study whether thyroid function was associated with risk of hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, data from the second and third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register in order to identify total hip or knee replacement as a result of primary osteoarthritis. RESULTS: Among 37 891 participants without previously known thyroid disease we recorded 978 total hip replacements (THRs) and 538 total knee replacements (TKRs) during a median follow-up time of 15.7 years. The analyses were adjusted for sex, age, BMI (body mass index), smoking, physical activity and diabetes. We did not find any association between TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) and THR or TKR due to osteoarthritis. Neither were changes in TSH over time, or overt hypo- or hyperthyroidism, associated with incidence of THR or TKR. CONCLUSION: No association was found between thyroid function and hip or knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2474 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28521834; PMCID:PMC5437592 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1924  
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Author Jorgensen, P.; Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Forsmo, S. url  doi
  Title Mortality in persons with undetected and diagnosed hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and hypothyroidism, compared with persons without corresponding disease – a prospective cohort study; The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Family Practice Abbreviated Journal BMC Fam Pract  
  Volume (down) 18 Issue 1 Pages 98  
  Keywords Chronic disease; Diabetes; Hypertension; Primary care; Public health; Thyroid disorders  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Suggested strategies in reducing the impact of non-communicable diseases (NCD) are early diagnosing and screening. We have limited proof of benefit of population screening for NCD. Increased mortality in persons with diagnosed NCD has been shown for decades. However, mortality in undetected NCD has barely been studied. This paper explores whether all-cause mortality differed between persons with diagnosed hypothyroidism, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and hypertension, compared with persons with undetected-, and with persons without the corresponding disease. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of the general population in Nord-Trondelag, Norway. Persons >/=20 years at baseline 1995-97 were followed until death or June 15, 2016. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute age and multiple adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between disease status and all-cause mortality. The number of participants in the hypothyroidism study was 31,960, in the T2DM study 37,957, and in the hypertension study 63,371. RESULTS: Mortality was increased in persons with diagnosed type 2 diabetes and hypertension, compared to persons without corresponding disease; HR 1.69 (95% CI 1.55-1.84) and HR 1.23 (95% CI 1.09-1.39), respectively. Among persons with undetected T2DM, the HR was 1.21 (95% CI 1.08-1.37), whilst among undetected hypothyroidism and hypertension, mortality was not increased compared with persons without the diseases. Further, the association with mortality was stronger in persons with long duration of T2DM (HR 1.96 (95% CI 1.57-2.44)) and hypertension (HR 1.32 (95% CI 1.17-1.49)), compared with persons with short duration (HR 1.29 (1.09-1.53) and HR 1.16 (1.03-1-30) respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Mortality was increased in persons with diagnosed T2DM and hypertension, and in undetected T2DM, compared with persons without the diseases. The strength of the association with mortality in undetected T2DM was however lower compared with persons with diagnosed T2DM, and mortality was not increased in persons with undetected hypothyroidism and hypertension, compared with persons without the diseases. Thus, future research needs to test more thoroughly if early diagnosing of these diseases, such as general population screening, is beneficial for health.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Postbox 8905, 7491, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2296 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29212453; PMCID:PMC5719734 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1935  
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Author Bauman, A.E.; Grunseit, A.C.; Rangul, V.; Heitmann, B.L. url  doi
  Title Physical activity, obesity and mortality: does pattern of physical activity have stronger epidemiological associations? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume (down) 17 Issue 1 Pages 788  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Hip circumference; Waist circumference  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortality outcomes, compared to single time-point measure of PA. METHODS: Data were the Danish MONICA (MONItoring Trends and Determinants in CArdiovascular Disease) study over three waves 1982-3 (time 1), 1987-8 (time 2) and 1993-4 (time 3). Associations between leisure time single time-point PA levels at time 1 and time 3, and sport and active travel at times 1 and 2 with BMI, waist, hip circumference and mortality (death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)) were compared to 'PA patterns' spanning multiple time points. PA pattern classified participants' PA as either 1) inactive or low PA at both time points; 2) moderate level PA at time 1 and high activity at time 3; or 3) a 'mixed PA pattern' indicating a varying levels of activity over time. Similarly, sport and active travel were also classified as indicating stable low, stable high and mixed patterns. RESULTS: The moderately and highly active groups for PA at times 1 and 3 had up to 1.7 cm lower increase in waist circumference compared with the inactive/low active group. Across 'PA patterns', 'active maintainers' had a 2.0 cm lower waist circumference than 'inactive/low maintainers'. Waist circumference was inversely related to sport but not active travel. CHD risk did not vary by activity levels at time 1, but was reduced significantly by 43% for high PA at time 3 (vs 'inactive' group) and among 'active maintainers' (vs 'inactive/low maintainers') by 62%. 'Sport pattern' showed stronger reductions in mortality for cardiovascular disease and CHD deaths among sport maintainers, than the single time point measures. CONCLUSIONS: PA patterns demonstrated a stronger association with a number of anthropometric and mortality outcomes than the single time-point measures. Operationalising PA as a sustained behavioural pattern may address some of the known under-estimation of risk for poor health in PA self-report measurements and better reflect exposure for epidemiological analysis of risk of health outcomes.  
  Address Copenhagen Center for Preventive Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen Capital Region, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28982371; PMCID:PMC5629749 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1880  
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Author Krokstad, S.; Ding, D.; Grunseit, A.C.; Sund, E.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Multiple lifestyle behaviours and mortality, findings from a large population-based Norwegian cohort study – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume (down) 17 Issue 1 Pages 58  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology; Cohort Studies; Diet/adverse effects; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; *Risk-Taking; Sleep; Smoking/adverse effects; Social Behavior; Young Adult; *All-cause mortality; *Cardiovascular disease; *Cohort study; *Lifestyle behaviour; *Metabolic disease; *Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lifestyle risk behaviours are responsible for a large proportion of disease burden and premature mortality worldwide. Risk behaviours tend to cluster in populations. We developed a new lifestyle risk index by including emerging risk factors (sleep, sitting time, and social participation) and examine unique risk combinations and their associations with all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality. METHODS: Data are from a large population-based cohort study in a Norway, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), with an average follow-up time of 14.1 years. Baseline data from 1995-97 were linked to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry. The analytic sample comprised 36 911 adults aged 20-69 years. Cox regression models were first fitted for seven risk factors (poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, current smoking, physical inactivity, excessive sitting, too much/too little sleep, and poor social participation) separately and then adjusted for socio-demographic covariates. Based on these results, a lifestyle risk index was developed. Finally, we explored common combinations of the risk factors in relation to all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality outcomes. RESULTS: All single risk factors, except for diet, were significantly associated with both mortality outcomes, and were therefore selected to form a lifestyle risk index. Risk of mortality increased as the index score increased. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality increased from 1.37 (1.15-1.62) to 6.15 (3.56-10.63) as the number of index risk factors increased from one to six respectively. Among the most common risk factor combinations the association with mortality was particularly strong when smoking and/or social participation were included. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to previous research on multiple risk behaviours by incorporating emerging risk factors. Findings regarding social participation and prolonged sitting suggest new components of healthy lifestyles and potential new directions for population health interventions.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28068991; PMCID:PMC5223537 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1946  
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Author Li, J.; Wu, B.; Selbaek, G.; Krokstad, S.; Helvik, A.-S. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with consumption of alcohol in older adults – a comparison between two cultures, China and Norway: the CLHLS and the HUNT-study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Geriatrics Abbreviated Journal BMC Geriatr  
  Volume (down) 17 Issue 1 Pages 172  
  Keywords Abstainers; Alcohol consumption; China; Elderly; Norway; Older adults  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about the consumption of alcohol among Chinese and Norwegian older adults aged 65 years and over. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and factors related to alcohol consumption among older adults in China and Norway. METHODS: The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) data in 2008-2009 conducted in China and The Nord-Trondelag Health Study data in 2006-2008 (HUNT3) conducted in Norway were used. Mulitvariable logistic regression was used to test the factors related to alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The prevalence of participants who drink alcohol in the Chinese and Norwegian sample were 19.88% and 46.2%, respectively. The weighted prevalence of participants with consumption of alcohol in the Chinese sample of women and men were 7.20% and 34.14%, respectively. In the Norwegian sample, the prevalence of consumption of alcohol were 43.31% and 65.35% for women and men, respectively. Factors such as younger age, higher level of education, living in urban areas, living with spouse or partner, and better health status were related to higher likelihood of alcohol consumption among Norwegian older women and men; while reported better health status and poorer life satisfaction were related to higher likelihood of alcohol consumption among Chinese. In addition, rural males and older females with higher level of education were more likely to consume alcohol. CONCLUSION: The alcohol consumption patterns were quite different between China and Norway. Besides economic development levels and cultures in the two different countries, demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, overall health status, and life satisfaction were associated with alcohol consumption as well.  
  Address St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2318 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28760157; PMCID:PMC5537928 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1947  
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Author Grunseit, A.C.; Chau, J.Y.; Rangul, V.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Patterns of sitting and mortality in the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume (down) 14 Issue 1 Pages 8  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Posture; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Self Report; Young Adult; *Cardiovascular disease; *Epidemiology; *Mortality; *Sedentary behaviour  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Current evidence concerning sedentary behaviour and mortality risk has used single time point assessments of sitting. Little is known about how changes in sitting levels over time affect subsequent mortality risk. AIM: To examine the associations between patterns of sitting time assessed at two time points 11 years apart and risk of all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality. METHODS: Participants were 25,651 adults aged > =20 years old from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study with self-reported total sitting time in 1995-1997 (HUNT2) and 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Four categories characterised patterns of sitting: (1) low at HUNT2/ low at HUNT3, 'consistently low sitting'; (2) low at HUNT2/high at HUNT3, 'increased sitting'; (3) high at HUNT2/low at HUNT3, 'reduced sitting'; and (4) high at HUNT2 /high at HUNT3, 'consistently high sitting'. Associations of sitting pattern with all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality were analysed using Cox regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.2 years (158880 person-years); 1212 participants died. Compared to 'consistently low sitting', adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.28-2.78), 1.03 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.06-1.51) for 'increased sitting', 'reduced sitting' and 'consistently high sitting' respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Examining patterns of sitting over time augments single time-point analyses of risk exposures associated with high sitting time. Whilst sitting habits can be stable over a long period, life events (e.g., changing jobs, retiring or illness) may influence sitting trajectories and therefore sitting-attributable risk. Reducing sitting may yield mortality risks comparable to a stable low-sitting pattern.  
  Address Department of Public health and General practice, HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28122625; PMCID:PMC5267382 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1918  
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Author Graff, M.; Scott, R.A.; Justice, A.E.; Young, K.L.; Feitosa, M.F.; Barata, L.; Winkler, T.W.; Chu, A.Y.; Mahajan, A.; Hadley, D.; Xue, L.; Workalemahu, T.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; den Hoed, M.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Qi, Q.; Ngwa, J.S.; Renstrom, F.; Quaye, L.; Eicher, J.D.; Hayes, J.E.; Cornelis, M.; Kutalik, Z.; Lim, E.; Luan, J.'an; Huffman, J.E.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, W.; Griffin, P.J.; Haller, T.; Ahmad, S.; Marques-Vidal, P.M.; Bien, S.; Yengo, L.; Teumer, A.; Smith, A.V.; Kumari, M.; Harder, M.N.; Justesen, J.M.; Kleber, M.E.; Hollensted, M.; Lohman, K.; Rivera, N.V.; Whitfield, J.B.; Zhao, J.H.; Stringham, H.M.; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Huppertz, C.; Willemsen, G.; Peyrot, W.J.; Wu, Y.; Kristiansson, K.; Demirkan, A.; Fornage, M.; Hassinen, M.; Bielak, L.F.; Cadby, G.; Tanaka, T.; Magi, R.; van der Most, P.J.; Jackson, A.U.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Vitart, V.; Marten, J.; Navarro, P.; Bellis, C.; Pasko, D.; Johansson, A.; Snitker, S.; Cheng, Y.-C.; Eriksson, J.; Lim, U.; Aadahl, M.; Adair, L.S.; Amin, N.; Balkau, B.; Auvinen, J.; Beilby, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Bergmann, S.; Bertoni, A.G.; Blangero, J.; Bonnefond, A.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Borja, J.B.; Brage, S.; Busonero, F.; Buyske, S.; Campbell, H.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Corre, T.; Smith, G.D.; Delgado, G.E.; Dueker, N.; Dorr, M.; Ebeling, T.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Esko, T.; Faul, J.D.; Fu, M.; Faerch, K.; Gieger, C.; Glaser, S.; Gong, J.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Grallert, H.; Grammer, T.B.; Grarup, N.; van Grootheest, G.; Harald, K.; Hastie, N.D.; Havulinna, A.S.; Hernandez, D.; Hindorff, L.; Hocking, L.J.; Holmens, O.L.; Holzapfel, C.; Hottenga, J.J.; Huang, J.; Huang, T.; Hui, J.; Huth, C.; Hutri-Kahonen, N.; James, A.L.; Jansson, J.-O.; Jhun, M.A.; Juonala, M.; Kinnunen, L.; Koistinen, H.A.; Kolcic, I.; Komulainen, P.; Kuusisto, J.; Kvaloy, K.; Kahonen, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Launer, L.J.; Lehne, B.; Lindgren, C.M.; Lorentzon, M.; Luben, R.; Marre, M.; Milaneschi, Y.; Monda, K.L.; Montgomery, G.W.; De Moor, M.H.M.; Mulas, A.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Musk, A.W.; Mannikko, R.; Mannisto, S.; Narisu, N.; Nauck, M.; Nettleton, J.A.; Nolte, I.M.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Olden, M.; Ong, K.K.; Padmanabhan, S.; Paternoster, L.; Perez, J.; Perola, M.; Peters, A.; Peters, U.; Peyser, P.A.; Prokopenko, I.; Puolijoki, H.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rankinen, T.; Rasmussen-Torvik, L.J.; Rawal, R.; Ridker, P.M.; Rose, L.M.; Rudan, I.; Sarti, C.; Sarzynski, M.A.; Savonen, K.; Scott, W.R.; Sanna, S.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Sidney, S.; Silbernagel, G.; Smith, B.H.; Smith, J.A.; Snieder, H.; Stancakova, A.; Sternfeld, B.; Swift, A.J.; Tammelin, T.; Tan, S.-T.; Thorand, B.; Thuillier, D.; Vandenput, L.; Vestergaard, H.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vohl, M.-C.; Volker, U.; Waeber, G.; Walker, M.; Wild, S.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zillikens, M.C.; Zubair, N.; Haiman, C.A.; Lemarchand, L.; Gyllensten, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Hofman, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Perusse, L.; Wilson, J.F.; Hayward, C.; Polasek, O.; Cucca, F.; Hveem, K.; Hartman, C.A.; Tonjes, A.; Bandinelli, S.; Palmer, L.J.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Rauramaa, R.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Salomaa, V.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; Lehtimaki, T.; Mangino, M.; Laakso, M.; Bouchard, C.; Martin, N.G.; Kuh, D.; Liu, Y.; Linneberg, A.; Marz, W.; Strauch, K.; Kivimaki, M.; Harris, T.B.; Gudnason, V.; Volzke, H.; Qi, L.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Chambers, J.C.; Kooner, J.S.; Froguel, P.; Kooperberg, C.; Vollenweider, P.; Hallmans, G.; Hansen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Metspalu, A.; Wareham, N.J.; Langenberg, C.; Weir, D.R.; Porteous, D.J.; Boerwinkle, E.; Chasman, D.I.; Abecasis, G.R.; Barroso, I.; McCarthy, M.I.; Frayling, T.M.; O'Connell, J.R.; van Duijn, C.M.; Boehnke, M.; Heid, I.M.; Mohlke, K.L.; Strachan, D.P.; Fox, C.S.; Liu, C.-T.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Klein, R.J.; Johnson, A.D.; Borecki, I.B.; Franks, P.W.; North, K.E.; Cupples, L.A.; Loos, R.J.F.; Kilpelainen, T.O. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity – A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults Type Meta-Analysis
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS Genetics Abbreviated Journal PLoS Genet  
  Volume (down) 13 Issue 4 Pages e1006528  
  Keywords Adiposity/*genetics/physiology; Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; Epigenomics; *Exercise; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Male; Obesity/*genetics/physiopathology; Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.  
  Address The Department of Preventive Medicine, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States of America  
  Corporate Author PAGE Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1553-7390 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28448500; PMCID:PMC5407576 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1909  
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Author Bjornland, T.; Langaas, M.; Grill, V.; Mostad, I.L. url  doi
  Title Assessing gene-environment interaction effects of FTO, MC4R and lifestyle factors on obesity using an extreme phenotype sampling design: Results from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (down) 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175071  
  Keywords Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; *Gene-Environment Interaction; Humans; *Life Style; Obesity/*genetics; *Phenotype; Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4/*genetics; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess the influence of age, gender and lifestyle factors on the effect of the obesity-promoting alleles of FTO and MCR4. METHODS: The HUNT study comprises health information on the population of Nord-Trondelag county, Norway. Extreme phenotype participants (gender-wise lower and upper quartiles of waist-hip-ratio and BMI >/= 35 kg/m2) in the third survey, HUNT3 (2006-08), were genotyped for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609 (FTO) and rs17782313 (MC4R); 25686 participants were successfully genotyped. Extreme sampling was chosen to increase power to detect genetic and gene-environment effects on waist-hip-ratio and BMI. Statistical inference was based on linear regression models and a missing-covariate likelihood approach for the extreme phenotype sampling design. Environmental factors were physical activity, diet (artificially sweetened beverages) and smoking. Longitudinal analysis was performed using material from HUNT2 (1995-97). RESULTS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal genetic effects indicated stronger genetic associations with obesity in young than in old, as well as differences between women and men. We observed larger genetic effects among physically inactive compared to active individuals. This interaction was age-dependent and seen mainly in 20-40 year olds. We observed a greater FTO effect among men with a regular intake of artificially sweetened beverages, compared to non-drinkers. Interaction analysis of smoking was mainly inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: In a large all-adult and area-based population survey the effects of obesity-promoting minor-alleles of FTO and MCR4, and interactions with life style factors are age- and gender-related. These findings appear relevant when designing individualized treatment for and prophylaxis against obesity.  
  Address Department of Clinical Nutrition and Speech-Language Therapy, Clinic of Clinical Services, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28384342; PMCID:PMC5383228 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1884  
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Author Borte, S.; Winsvold, B.S.; Stensland, S.O.; Smastuen, M.C.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (down) 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175908  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology/*etiology; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Logistic Models; Male; Migraine Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Tension-Type Headache/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults. METHODS: The population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3) contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile), small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile) or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth. RESULTS: The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001), but not in females (p = 0.20). In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001), with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08) compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28410431; PMCID:PMC5391957 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1885  
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Author Johnsen, M.B.; Hellevik, A.I.; Smastuen, M.C.; Langhammer, A.; Furnes, O.; Flugsrud, G.B.; Nordsletten, L.; Zwart, J.A.; Storheim, K. url  doi
  Title The mediating effect of body mass index on the relationship between smoking and hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis. A population-based cohort study (the HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (down) 12 Issue 12 Pages e0190288  
  Keywords  
  Abstract To investigate the total effect of smoking on total hip or knee replacement (THR/TKR) due to primary osteoarthritis (OA) and to quantify the indirect effect of smoking through body mass index (BMI). Participants from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study) were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register to detect the first THR or TKR due to primary OA. A mediation analysis was used to decompose the total effect of smoking into a direct and indirect effect. BMI was considered a mediator in the analysis. All effects were estimated as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The indirect effect of smoking mediated through BMI was expressed as a percentage (proportion*100). In total 55 188 participants were followed up during 17.2 years (median). We identified 1322 THRs and 754 TKRs. For men, the total effect of current vs. never smoking revealed a decreased risk of THR (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.46-0.76) and TKR (HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.32-0.66). For women, current smoking increased the risk of THR (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.60). For men, 6% and 7% of the risk reduction for THR and TKR, respectively, was mediated by BMI. We found a negative association between smoking and THR or TKR for men. On the contrary, smoking was associated with increased risk of THR for women. Most of the effect of smoking on joint replacement risk remained unexplained by BMI.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29284048; PMCID:PMC5746263 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1933  
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Author Torske, M.O.; Krokstad, S.; Stamatakis, E.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Dog ownership and all-cause mortality in a population cohort in Norway: The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (down) 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179832  
  Keywords Adult; Animals; *Cause of Death; Cohort Studies; Dogs; Exercise; Female; Health Status; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortality; Norway/epidemiology; *Ownership; *Population Surveillance; Walking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has been increased interest in human-animal interactions and their possible effects on human health. Some of this research has focused on human physical activity levels, mediated through increased dog walking. Much of the reported research has been cross sectional, and very few epidemiological studies have examined the association between dog ownership and mortality in populations. METHODS: We used data from the Norwegian county population-based Nord-Trondelag HUNT Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to analyse the relationship between dog ownership and all-cause mortality. The median follow-up time was 18.5 years and the maximum follow-up time was 19.7 years. RESULTS: In this population, dog owners were no more physically active than non-dog owners, both groups reporting a total of just over 3 hours/week of light and vigorous activity. Dog owners (n = 25,031, with 1,587 deaths during follow-up; 504,017 person-years of time at risk) had virtually the same hazard of dying as non-dog owners (Hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence for an association between the presence of a dog in the household and all-cause mortality or physical activity levels in this Norwegian population. Further epidemiological research is needed to clarify this relationship, as methodological limitations and an active Norwegian population sample means that generalizable evidence is not yet clear on dog ownership and mortality.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition