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Author Sen, A.; Opdahl, S.; Strand, L.B.; Vatten, L.J.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title Insomnia and the Risk of Breast Cancer: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Psychosomatic Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychosom Med  
  Volume 79 Issue 4 Pages 461-468  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The association of insomnia with subsequent breast cancer risk is largely unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether different symptoms of insomnia and their combination are associated with incident breast cancer in a large population-based study. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, 33,332 women were followed to monitor the occurrence of their first invasive breast cancer identified by the Cancer Registry of Norway. Insomnia symptoms including () nonrestorative sleep and () difficulty initiating and () maintaining sleep were self-reported using a study specific measure reflecting the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multiadjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: A total of 862 incident breast cancer cases occurred during a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. No consistent association was observed between the individual insomnia symptoms and breast cancer risk. However, compared to women reporting no insomnia complaints, those who reported having all three aspects of insomnia simultaneously were at increased risk (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval = 1.11-5.09). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that having only some aspects of insomnia may not predispose someone to breast cancer. In contrast, experiencing all insomnia symptoms simultaneously might confer considerable excess risk.  
  Address From the Department of Public Health and General Practice (Sen, Opdahl, Strand, Vatten, Laugsand, Janszky), Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Internal Medicine (Laugsand), St. Olav's hospital, Trondheim, Norway; and Department of Public Health Sciences (Janszky), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-3174 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27763987 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1978  
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Author Simic, A.; Hansen, A.F.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Midthjell, K.; Syversen, T.; Flaten, T.P. url  doi
  Title Trace element status in patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway: The HUNT3 Survey Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) Abbreviated Journal J Trace Elem Med Biol  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages 91-98  
  Keywords Aged; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*blood/diagnosis/epidemiology; Female; *Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Trace Elements/*blood; Case-control study; Hunt3; Trace elements; Type 2 diabetes; Whole blood  
  Abstract Several epidemiological studies have indicated that a number of trace elements may play a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D). We investigated the association between prevalent T2D and the concentrations of 25 trace elements in whole blood, and the relationships between T2D duration and blood levels of the trace elements that we found to be related to T2D prevalence. In this population based case-control study, 267 patients with self-reported T2D and 609 controls (frequency matched), were selected from the third Nord-Trondelag Health Survey. Trace element blood levels were determined by high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Multivariable conditional logistic regression and multivariable linear regression were used to estimate associations. The prevalence of T2D was positively associated with boron, calcium and silver, and inversely associated with indium, lead and magnesium (Ptrend<0.05). We found no statistical evidence for associations between blood levels of arsenic, bromine, cadmium, cesium, chromium, copper, gallium, gold, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, rubidium, selenium, strontium, tantalum, thallium, tin and zinc and T2D prevalence. After corrections for multiple testing, associations remained significant for calcium and lead (Qtrend<0.05), and borderline significant for magnesium, silver and boron. With increasing disease duration, higher calcium levels were observed (P<0.05). This study suggests an association between prevalent T2D and blood levels of boron, calcium, indium, lead, magnesium and silver.  
  Address Department of Chemistry, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0946-672X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28347468 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1979  
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Author Skaaby, T.; Taylor, A.E.; Jacobsen, R.K.; Paternoster, L.; Thuesen, B.H.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Larsen, S.C.; Zhou, A.; Wong, A.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Flexeder, C.; Mannisto, S.; Hardy, R.; Kuh, D.; Barry, S.J.; Tang Mollehave, L.; Cerqueira, C.; Friedrich, N.; Bonten, T.N.; Noordam, R.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Taube, C.; Jessen, L.E.; McConnachie, A.; Sattar, N.; Upton, M.N.; McSharry, C.; Bonnelykke, K.; Bisgaard, H.; Schulz, H.; Strauch, K.; Meitinger, T.; Peters, A.; Grallert, H.; Nohr, E.A.; Kivimaki, M.; Kumari, M.; Volker, U.; Nauck, M.; Volzke, H.; Power, C.; Hypponen, E.; Hansen, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Salomaa, V.; Grarup, N.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.R.; Skorpen, F.; Kaprio, J.; R Munafo, M.; Linneberg, A. url  doi
  Title Investigating the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA consortium Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2224  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.61, 0.76; P < 0.001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.86; P < 0.001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.09; P = 0.967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0.958, 95% CI: 0.920, 0.998; P = 0.041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.02; P = 0.117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.11; P = 0.020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.  
  Address Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28533558; PMCID:PMC5440386 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1980  
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Author Snekvik, I.; Smith, C.H.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Langan, S.M.; Modalsli, E.H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Obesity, Waist Circumference, Weight Change, and Risk of Incident Psoriasis: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication The Journal of Investigative Dermatology Abbreviated Journal J Invest Dermatol  
  Volume 137 Issue 12 Pages 2484-2490  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Obesity/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Psoriasis/complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; *Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Although psoriasis has been associated with obesity, there are few prospective studies with objective measures. We prospectively examined the effect of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, and 10-year weight change on the risk of developing psoriasis among 33,734 people in the population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (i.e., HUNT), Norway. During follow-up, 369 incident psoriasis cases occurred. Relative risk (RR) of psoriasis was estimated by Cox regression. One standard deviation higher body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio gave RRs of 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.34), 1.26 (95% CI = 1.15-1.39), and 1.18 (95% CI = 1.07-1.31), respectively. Compared with normal weight participants, obese people had an RR of 1.87 (95% CI = 1.38-2.52), whereas comparing the fourth with the first quartile of waist circumference gave an RR of 1.95 (95% CI = 1.46-2.61). One standard deviation higher weight change gave an RR of 1.20 (95% CI = 1.07-1.35), and people who increased their body weight by 10 kg or more had an RR of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.15-2.58) compared with being weight stable. In conclusion, obesity and high abdominal fat mass doubles the risk of psoriasis, and long-term weight gain substantially increases psoriasis risk. Preventing weight gain and promoting maintenance of a normal body weight could reduce incidence of psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Dermatology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway; Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-202X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28780086 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1988  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Chen, Y.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Wu, C.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Passive smoking in relation to lung cancer incidence and histologic types in Norwegian adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 50 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Dept of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29025890 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1989  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, chronic diseases and all-cause mortality in a population-based prospective cohort: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages e017256  
  Keywords 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D); all-cause mortality; chronic diseases; prospective cohort study; vitamin D  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of vitamin D status with all-cause mortality in a Norwegian population and the potential influences of existing chronic diseases on the association. DESIGN: A population-based prospective cohort study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample (n=6613) of adults aged 20 years or older in a cohort. METHODS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured in blood samples collected at baseline (n=6377). Mortality was ascertained from the Norwegian National Registry. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the HRs with 95% CIs for all-cause mortality in association with serum 25(OH)D levels after adjustment for a wide spectrum of confounding factors as well as chronic diseases at baseline. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 18.5 years, during which 1539 subjects died. The HRs for all-cause mortality associated with the first quartile level of 25(OH)D (<34.5 nmol/L) as compared with the fourth quartile (>/=58.1 nmol/L) before and after adjustment for chronic diseases at baseline were 1.30 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.51) and 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), respectively. In the subjects without chronic diseases at baseline and with further exclusion of the first 3 years of follow-up, the corresponding adjusted HR was 1.34 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.66). CONCLUSIONS: Low serum 25(OH)D level was associated with increased all-cause mortality in a general Norwegian population. The association was not notably influenced by existing chronic diseases.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28674149; PMCID:PMC5734252 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1990  
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Author Thomsen, L.C.V.; McCarthy, N.S.; Melton, P.E.; Cadby, G.; Austgulen, R.; Nygard, O.K.; Johnson, M.P.; Brennecke, S.; Moses, E.K.; Bjorge, L.; Iversen, A.-C. url  doi
  Title The antihypertensive MTHFR gene polymorphism rs17367504-G is a possible novel protective locus for preeclampsia Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal J Hypertens  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 132-139  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Alleles; Australia; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gene Frequency; Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Hypertension/genetics; Inflammation/genetics; Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)/*genetics; Norway; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Pre-Eclampsia/*genetics; Pregnancy; Protective Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Preeclampsia is a complex heterogeneous disease commonly defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy. Women experiencing preeclampsia have increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) later in life. Preeclampsia and CVD share risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulated inflammation and raised blood pressure. Despite commonalities, little is known about the contribution of shared genes (pleiotropy) to these diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether genetic risk factors for hypertension or inflammation are pleiotropic by also being associated with preeclampsia. METHODS: We genotyped 122 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in women with preeclampsia (n = 1006) and nonpreeclamptic controls (n = 816) from the Norwegian HUNT Study. SNPs were chosen on the basis of previously reported associations with either nongestational hypertension or inflammation in genome-wide association studies. The SNPs were tested for association with preeclampsia in a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS: The minor (G) allele of the intronic SNP rs17367504 in the gene methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was associated with a protective effect on preeclampsia (odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.80) in the Norwegian cohort. This association did not replicate in an Australian preeclampsia case-control cohort (P = 0.68, odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.32, minor allele frequency = 0.15). CONCLUSION: MTHFR is important for regulating transmethylation processes and is involved in regulation of folate metabolism. The G allele of rs17367504 has previously been shown to protect against nongestational hypertension. Our study suggests a novel association between this allele and reduced risk for preeclampsia. This is the first study associating the minor (G) allele of a SNP within the MTHFR gene with a protective effect on preeclampsia, and in doing so identifying a possible pleiotropic protective effect on preeclampsia and hypertension.  
  Address aDepartment of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Haukeland University Hospital bDepartment of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway cCentre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia dDepartment of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim eDepartment of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway fSouth Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Texas, USA gDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville hPregnancy Research Centre, Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria iFaculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0263-6352 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27755385; PMCID:PMC5131692 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1996  
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Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Extracellular matrix markers and risk of myocardial infarction: The HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol  
  Volume 24 Issue 11 Pages 1161-1167  
  Keywords Extracellular matrix; Ykl-40; case-control; myocardial infarction  
  Abstract Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling may influence atherosclerotic progression and plaque stability. We hypothesized that evaluation of extracellular matrix markers, with potentially different roles during atherogenesis, could provide information on underlying mechanisms and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. A total of 58,761 men and women, free of known cardiovascular disease, were followed for a first MI. During 11.3 years of follow-up, 1587 incident MIs were registered, and these cases were compared with 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. Circulating levels of the ECM proteins CD147 (ECM metalloproteinase inducer; EMMPRIN), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP: thrombospondin-5) and YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like-1) were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Results We found an inverse association between COMP (quartile (Q) 4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.98)) and YKL-40 (Q4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.77 (0.62-0.95)) with incidence of MI after full multivariable adjustment. Serum CD147 was not associated with MI risk in adjusted analysis. Conclusion High levels of COMP and YKL-40 were associated with lower risk of incident MI, suggesting a potential beneficial role in promoting plaque stability in individuals without incident cardiovascular disease.  
  Address 12 Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-4873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28429960 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1999  
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Author Videm, V.; Thomas, R.; Brown, M.A.; Hoff, M. url  doi
  Title Self-reported Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis or Ankylosing Spondylitis Has Low Accuracy: Data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication The Journal of Rheumatology Abbreviated Journal J Rheumatol  
  Volume 44 Issue 8 Pages 1134-1141  
  Keywords Ankylosing Spondylitis; Epidemiology; Rheumatoid Arthritis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Self-reported diagnoses of inflammatory arthritis are not accurate. The primary study aim was to ascertain self-reported diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the Norwegian population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) using hospital case files. The secondary aim was to provide updated estimates of the prevalence and incidence of RA and AS. METHODS: All inhabitants >/= 20 years old from the county of Nord-Trondelag were invited. Data from 70,805 unique participants from HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) were included. For participants who self-reported RA or AS, case files from all 3 hospitals in the catchment area were evaluated using standardized diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: Of 2703 self-reported cases of RA, 19.1% were verified in hospital files. Of 1064 self-reported cases of AS, 15.8% were verified. Of 259 cases self-reporting both RA and AS, 8.1% had RA and 5.4% had AS. Overall, a self-report of 1 or both diagnoses could not be verified in 82.1%, including 22.8% with insufficient information or no case file. The prevalence of RA was 768 (95% CI 705-835) per 100,000. The incidence of RA from HUNT2 to HUNT3 was 0.48 (0.41-0.56) per 1000 per year. The prevalence of AS was 264 (228-305) per 100,000. The incidence of AS from HUNT2 to HUNT3 was 0.19 (0.15-0.24) per 1000 per year. CONCLUSION: Self-reported diagnoses of RA and AS are often false-positive. The prevalence and incidence of RA were comparable to reports from similar populations. The incidence of AS was higher than previously reported in a mixed population from Norway.  
  Address V. Videm, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, NTNU, and Senior Consultant, Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital; R. Thomas, MBBS, FRACP, MD, Professor, Translational Research Institute, University of Queensland; M.A. Brown, MBBS, MD, Director of Genomics, Queensland University of Technology, Institute of Health and Biomedical Research, Princess Alexandra Hospital; M. Hoff, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Public Health and General Practice and Department of Neuroscience, NTNU, and Senior Consultant, Department of Rheumatology, St. Olavs Hospital  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0315-162X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28412703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2001  
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Author Vie, G.A.; Pape, K.; Krokstad, S.; Johnsen, R.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Temporal changes in health within 5 years before and after disability pension-the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication European Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Eur J Public Health  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 653-659  
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  Abstract Background: Health status has been reported to change before, during and after disability pension receipt. These associations might be subject to temporal changes according to changes in policy, incidence of disability pensions and other contextual factors. We compared the perceived health around time of disability retirement among persons receiving disability pension in the 1990 s and 2000 s in Norway. Methods: We linked data from two consecutive cross-sectional population based Norwegian health surveys, HUNT2 (1995-97) and HUNT3 (2006-08), to national registries, identifying those who received disability pension within 5 years before or after participation in the survey (HUNT2: n = 5362, HUNT3: n = 4649). We used logistic regression to assess associations of time from receiving a disability pension with self-rated health, insomnia, depression and anxiety symptoms and subsequently estimated adjusted prevalence over time. Results: Prevalence of poor self-rated health peaked around time of receiving disability pension in both decades. For those aged 50+, prevalence the year before disability pension was slightly lower in 2006-08 (74%, 95% CI 70-79%) than in 1995-97 (83%, 95% CI 79-87%), whereas peak prevalence was similar between surveys for those younger than 50. Depression symptoms peaked more pronouncedly in 1995-97 than in 2006-08, whereas prevalence of anxiety symptoms was similar at time of receiving disability pension between surveys. Conclusions: We found no strong evidence of differences in health selection to disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s. However, we found indication of less depression symptoms around time of disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s.  
  Address Forensic Department and Research Centre Broset, St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1101-1262 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28637220 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2002  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Wu, C.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level with incidence of lung cancer and histologic types in Norwegian adults: a case-cohort analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Case-cohort study; Histologic types; Lung cancer; Pulmonary adenocarcinoma; Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; Vitamin D  
  Abstract Previous prospective studies have shown inconsistent associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and lung cancer incidence. The aim of the present study was to explore the associations of serum 25(OH)D levels with incidence of lung cancer overall and different histologic types. We performed a population-based prospective case-cohort study including 696 incident lung cancer cases and 5804 individuals in a subcohort who participated in the second survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway. Cox proportional hazards regression models counting for the case-cohort design were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) for lung cancer overall or histologic types in relation to serum 25(OH)D levels. Compared with the fourth season-specific quartile of 25(OH)D (median 68.0 nmol/L), lower 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the incidence of overall, small or squamous cell lung cancer. However, the risk of adenocarcinoma was lower in the second and third quartiles (median 39.9 and 51.5 nmol/L) compared with the fourth quartile, with HRs of 0.63 (95% CI 0.41-0.98) and 0.58 (0.38-0.88), respectively. The associations of lower levels of 25(OH)D with a reduced risk of adenocarcinoma were only observed in the overweight/obese subjects [HRs for second and third quartiles: 0.40 (0.22-0.72) and 0.50 (0.27-0.92)] but not in the normal weight subjects [HRs: 0.95 (0.52-1.75) and 0.60 (0.32-1.10)]. Serum 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the risk of lung cancer in general. The observation that lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with a lower risk of adenocarcinoma should be interpreted with caution.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:29080012 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2007  
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Author Talseth, A.; Edna, T.-H.; Hveem, K.; Lydersen, S.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Quality of life and psychological and gastrointestinal symptoms after cholecystectomy: a population-based cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication BMJ Open Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Gastroenterol  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages e000128  
  Keywords Cholecystectomy; Gastrointestinal Function; Quality Of Life  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The study aims to examine gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life and the risk of psychological symptoms after cholecystectomy. DESIGN: This is a prospective population-based cohort study based on the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Norway. HUNT is a repeated health survey of the county population and includes a wide range of health-related items. In the present study, all 3 HUNT surveys were included, performed between 1984 and 2008. Selected items were scores on quality of life, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and selected gastrointestinal symptoms. Participants who underwent cholecystectomy for gallstone disease between 1 January 1990 and until 1 year before attending HUNT3 were compared with the remaining non-operated cohort. Associations between cholecystectomy and the postoperative scores and symptoms were assessed by multivariable regression models. RESULTS: Participants in HUNT1, HUNT2 and HUNT3 were 77 212 (89.4% of those invited), 65 237 (69.5%) and 50 807 (54.1%), respectively. In the study period, 931 participants were operated with cholecystectomy. Cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of diarrhoea and stomach pain postoperatively. In addition, cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of nausea postoperatively in men. We found no associations between cholecystectomy and quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation following surgery. CONCLUSIONS: In this large population-based cohort study, cholecystectomy was associated with postoperative diarrhoea and stomach pain. Cholecystectomy for gallstone colic was associated with nausea in men. There were no associations between quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-4774 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28761686; PMCID:PMC5508800 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2008  
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Author Taylor, A.E.; Carslake, D.; de Mola, C.L.; Rydell, M.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Horta, B.L.; Pearson, R.; Rai, D.; Galanti, M.R.; Barros, F.C.; Romundstad, P.R.; Davey Smith, G.; Munafo, M.R. url  doi
  Title Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy and Offspring Depression: a cross cohort and negative control study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 12579  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Previous reports suggest that offspring of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have greater risk of developing depression. However, it is unclear whether this is due to intrauterine effects. Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) from the UK (N = 2,869), the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) from Norway (N = 15,493), the Pelotas 1982 Birth Cohort Study from Brazil (N = 2,626), and the Swedish Sibling Health Cohort (N = 258 sibling pairs), we compared associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy and mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy with offspring depression and performed a discordant sibling analysis. In meta-analysis, maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher odds of offspring depression (OR 1.20, 95% CI:1.08,1.34), but mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy was not (OR 1.05, 95% CI:0.94,1.17). However, there was only weak statistical evidence that the odds ratios for maternal and mother's partner's smoking differed from each other (p = 0.08). There was no clear evidence for an association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring depression in the sibling analysis. Findings do not provide strong support for a causal role of maternal smoking during pregnancy in offspring depression, rather observed associations may reflect residual confounding relating to characteristics of parents who smoke.  
  Address UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28974730; PMCID:PMC5626710 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2010  
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Author Theofylaktopoulou, D.; Midttun, O.; Ueland, P.M.; Meyer, K.; Fanidi, A.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Prentice, R.; Pettinger, M.; Thomson, C.A.; Giles, G.G.; Hodge, A.; Cai, Q.; Blot, W.J.; Wu, J.; Johansson, M.; Hultdin, J.; Grankvist, K.; Stevens, V.L.; McCullough, M.M.; Weinstein, S.J.; Albanes, D.; Ziegler, R.; Freedman, N.D.; Langhammer, A.; Hveem, K.; Naess, M.; Sesso, H.D.; Gaziano, J.M.; Buring, J.E.; Lee, I.-M.; Severi, G.; Zhang, X.; Stampfer, M.J.; Han, J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Le Marchand, L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Wang, R.; Butler, L.M.; Koh, W.-P.; Gao, Y.-T.; Rothman, N.; Ericson, U.; Sonestedt, E.; Visvanathan, K.; Jones, M.R.; Relton, C.; Brennan, P.; Johansson, M.; Ulvik, A. url  doi
  Title Impaired functional vitamin B6 status is associated with increased risk of lung cancer Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid; Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium; functional vitamin B6 marker; pyridoxal 5'-phosphate  
  Abstract Circulating vitamin B6 levels have been found to be inversely associated with lung cancer. Most studies have focused on the B6 form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a direct biomarker influenced by inflammation and other factors. Using a functional B6 marker allows further investigation of the potential role of vitamin B6 status in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. We prospectively evaluated the association of the functional marker of vitamin B6 status, the 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid (HK:XA) ratio, with risk of lung cancer in a nested case-control study consisting of 5,364 matched case-control pairs from the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between HK:XA and lung cancer, and random effect models to combine results from different cohorts and regions. High levels of HK:XA, indicating impaired functional B6 status, were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, the odds ratio comparing the fourth and the first quartiles (OR4thvs.1st ) was 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.41). Stratified analyses indicated that this association was primarily driven by cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. Notably, the risk associated with HK:XA was approximately 50% higher in groups with a high relative frequency of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., men, former and current smokers. This risk of squamous cell carcinoma was present in both men and women regardless of smoking status.  
  Address Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29238985 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2011  
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Author Thorstensen, K.; Kvitland, M.A.; Irgens, W.O.; Asberg, A.; Borch-Iohnsen, B.; Moen, T.; Hveem, K. url  doi
  Title Iron loading in HFE p.C282Y homozygotes found by population screening: relationships to HLA-type and T-lymphocyte subsets Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation Abbreviated Journal Scand J Clin Lab Invest  
  Volume 77 Issue 7 Pages 477-485  
  Keywords Hla-A*03; Haplotypes; Mhc; homozygote; iron overload  
  Abstract Iron loading in p.C282Y homozygous HFE hemochromatosis subjects is highly variable, and it is unclear what factors cause this variability. Finding such factors could aid in predicting which patients are at highest risk and require closest follow-up. The degree of iron loading has previously been associated with certain HLA-types and with abnormally low CD8 + cell counts in peripheral blood. In 183 Norwegian, p.C282Y homozygotes (104 men, 79 women) originally found through population screening we determined HLA type and measured total T-lymphocytes, CD4 + and CD8 + cells, and compared this with data on iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous men, but not in homozygous women, we found that the presence of two HLA-A*03 alleles increased the iron load on average by approximately 2-fold compared to p.C282Y homozygous men carrying zero or one A*03 allele. On the other hand, the presence of two HLA-A*01 alleles, in male subjects, apparently reduced the iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous individuals, the iron loading was increased if the CD8 + cell number was below the 25 percentile or if the CD4 + cell number was above the 75 percentile. This effect appeared to be additive to the effect of the number of HLA-A*03 alleles. Our data indicate that homozygosity for the HLA-A*03 allele significantly increases the risk of excessive iron loading in Norwegian p.C282Y homozygous male patients. In addition, low CD8 + cell number or high CD4 + cell number further increases the risk of excessive iron loading.  
  Address d HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28678636 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2013  
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Author Torske, M.O.; Krokstad, S.; Stamatakis, E.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Dog ownership and all-cause mortality in a population cohort in Norway: The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179832  
  Keywords Adult; Animals; *Cause of Death; Cohort Studies; Dogs; Exercise; Female; Health Status; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortality; Norway/epidemiology; *Ownership; *Population Surveillance; Walking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has been increased interest in human-animal interactions and their possible effects on human health. Some of this research has focused on human physical activity levels, mediated through increased dog walking. Much of the reported research has been cross sectional, and very few epidemiological studies have examined the association between dog ownership and mortality in populations. METHODS: We used data from the Norwegian county population-based Nord-Trondelag HUNT Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to analyse the relationship between dog ownership and all-cause mortality. The median follow-up time was 18.5 years and the maximum follow-up time was 19.7 years. RESULTS: In this population, dog owners were no more physically active than non-dog owners, both groups reporting a total of just over 3 hours/week of light and vigorous activity. Dog owners (n = 25,031, with 1,587 deaths during follow-up; 504,017 person-years of time at risk) had virtually the same hazard of dying as non-dog owners (Hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence for an association between the presence of a dog in the household and all-cause mortality or physical activity levels in this Norwegian population. Further epidemiological research is needed to clarify this relationship, as methodological limitations and an active Norwegian population sample means that generalizable evidence is not yet clear on dog ownership and mortality.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28662069; PMCID:PMC5491039 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2014  
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Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers are not independently associated with MI risk in healthy individuals – results from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 243 Issue Pages 502-504  
  Keywords Leukocyte markers; Myocardial infarction  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that circulating markers reflecting monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. METHODS: Serum monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers soluble (s) CD163, sCD14, Gal3BP, sCD25 and sCD166 were analyzed by enzyme-immunoassay in a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. Among 58,761 apparently healthy men and women followed a median 11.3years, 1587 incident MI cases were registered, and compared to 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. RESULTS: Higher serum sCD163 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.27, P-trend 0.002), sCD14 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.38, P-trend<0.001), and especially sCD25 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.45, P-trend<0.001), were associated with increased MI risk in the age-and sex adjusted models. However, after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors these associations were strongly attenuated (Q4 vs Q1 ORs between 1.02 and 1.12, P-trends between 0.30 and 0.58). CONCLUSIONS: sCD163, sCD14 and sCD25 may reflect leukocyte activation and inflammatory mechanisms related to atherogenesis, but do not predict MI risk above and beyond conventional cardiovascular risk factors.  
  Address Department of Public Health, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28615143 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2016  
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Author Yu, D.; Takata, Y.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Blot, W.; Sawada, N.; White, E.; Freedman, N.; Robien, K.; Giovannucci, E.; Zhang, X.; Park, Y.; Gao, Y.-T.; Chlebowski, R.T.; Langhammer, A.; Yang, G.; Severi, G.; Manjer, J.; Khaw, K.-T.; Weiderpass, E.; Liao, L.M.; Caporaso, N.; Krokstad, S.; Hveem, K.; Sinha, R.; Ziegler, R.; Tsugane, S.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Johansson, M.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O. url  doi
  Title Prediagnostic Calcium Intake and Lung Cancer Survival: A Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume 26 Issue 7 Pages 1060-1070  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. Little is known about whether prediagnostic nutritional factors may affect survival. We examined the associations of prediagnostic calcium intake from foods and/or supplements with lung cancer survival.Methods: The present analysis included 23,882 incident, primary lung cancer patients from 12 prospective cohort studies. Dietary calcium intake was assessed using food-frequency questionnaires at baseline in each cohort and standardized to caloric intake of 2,000 kcal/d for women and 2,500 kcal/d for men. Stratified, multivariable-adjusted Cox regression was applied to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: The 5-year survival rates were 56%, 21%, and 5.7% for localized, regional, and distant stage lung cancer, respectively. Low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake (<500-600 mg/d, less than half of the recommendation) was associated with a small increase in risk of death compared with recommended calcium intakes (800-1,200 mg/d); HR (95% CI) was 1.07 (1.01-1.13) after adjusting for age, stage, histology, grade, smoking status, pack-years, and other potential prognostic factors. The association between low calcium intake and higher lung cancer mortality was evident primarily among localized/regional stage patients, with HR (95% CI) of 1.15 (1.04-1.27). No association was found for supplemental calcium with survival in the multivariable-adjusted model.Conclusions: This large pooled analysis is the first, to our knowledge, to indicate that low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake may be associated with poorer survival among early-stage lung cancer patients.Impact: This multinational prospective study linked low calcium intake to lung cancer prognosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1060-70. (c)2017 AACR.  
  Address Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. xiao-ou.shu@vanderbilt.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28264875; PMCID:PMC5500413 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2025  
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Author Zhou, W.; Fritsche, L.G.; Das, S.; Zhang, H.; Nielsen, J.B.; Holmen, O.L.; Chen, J.; Lin, M.; Elvestad, M.B.; Hveem, K.; Abecasis, G.R.; Kang, H.M.; Willer, C.J. url  doi
  Title Improving power of association tests using multiple sets of imputed genotypes from distributed reference panels Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Genetic Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Genet Epidemiol  
  Volume 41 Issue 8 Pages 744-755  
  Keywords Gwas; genotype imputation; multiple reference panels; population-specific; study power  
  Abstract The accuracy of genotype imputation depends upon two factors: the sample size of the reference panel and the genetic similarity between the reference panel and the target samples. When multiple reference panels are not consented to combine together, it is unclear how to combine the imputation results to optimize the power of genetic association studies. We compared the accuracy of 9,265 Norwegian genomes imputed from three reference panels-1000 Genomes phase 3 (1000G), Haplotype Reference Consortium (HRC), and a reference panel containing 2,201 Norwegian participants from the population-based Nord Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) from low-pass genome sequencing. We observed that the population-matched reference panel allowed for imputation of more population-specific variants with lower frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.05% and 0.5%). The overall imputation accuracy from the population-specific panel was substantially higher than 1000G and was comparable with HRC, despite HRC being 15-fold larger. These results recapitulate the value of population-specific reference panels for genotype imputation. We also evaluated different strategies to utilize multiple sets of imputed genotypes to increase the power of association studies. We observed that testing association for all variants imputed from any panel results in higher power to detect association than the alternative strategy of including only one version of each genetic variant, selected for having the highest imputation quality metric. This was particularly true for lower frequency variants (MAF < 1%), even after adjusting for the additional multiple testing burden.  
  Address Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0741-0395 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28861891 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2026  
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Author Zijlema, W.; Cai, Y.; Doiron, D.; Mbatchou, S.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; de Hoogh, K.; Morley, D.; Hodgson, S.; Elliott, P.; Key, T.; Kongsgard, H.; Hveem, K.; Gaye, A.; Burton, P.; Hansell, A.; Stolk, R.; Rosmalen, J. url  doi
  Title Corrigendum to “Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses of harmonized data from 88,336 participants” [Environ. Res. 151 (2016) 804-813] Type Published Erratum
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 152 Issue Pages 520  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27823774 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2027  
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Author Zisko, N.; Skjerve, K.N.; Tari, A.R.; Sandbakk, S.B.; Wisloff, U.; Nes, B.M.; Nauman, J. url  doi
  Title Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI), Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clustering – the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis  
  Volume 60 Issue 1 Pages 89-95  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Cardiovascular disease risk factors; Exercise; Exercise intensity; Physical activity; Sedentary behavior  
  Abstract Prolonged sedentary behavior (SB) positively associates with clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The recently developed metric for physical activity (PA) tracking called Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI) takes into account age, sex, resting and maximum heart rate, and a score of >/=100 weekly PAI has been shown to reduce the risk of premature CVD death in healthy as well as individuals with known CVD risk factors, regardless of whether or not the current PA recommendations were met. The aim of the present study was to examine if PAI modifies the associations between SB and CVD risk factor (CV-RF) clustering in a large apparently healthy general population cohort (n=29,950, aged >/=20 years). Logistic regression revealed that in those with >/=100 weekly PAI, the likelihood of CV-RF clustering prevalence associated with prolonged SB was attenuated across age groups. Monitoring weekly PAI-level could be useful to ensure that people perform enough PA to combat SB's deleterious association with CV-RF.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Cardiology, St. Olavs Hospital, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-0620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28274818 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2028  
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Author Webb, T.R.; Erdmann, J.; Stirrups, K.E.; Stitziel, N.O.; Masca, N.G.D.; Jansen, H.; Kanoni, S.; Nelson, C.P.; Ferrario, P.G.; Konig, I.R.; Eicher, J.D.; Johnson, A.D.; Hamby, S.E.; Betsholtz, C.; Ruusalepp, A.; Franzen, O.; Schadt, E.E.; Bjorkegren, J.L.M.; Weeke, P.E.; Auer, P.L.; Schick, U.M.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Dube, M.-P.; Goel, A.; Farrall, M.; Peloso, G.M.; Won, H.-H.; Do, R.; van Iperen, E.; Kruppa, J.; Mahajan, A.; Scott, R.A.; Willenborg, C.; Braund, P.S.; van Capelleveen, J.C.; Doney, A.S.F.; Donnelly, L.A.; Asselta, R.; Merlini, P.A.; Duga, S.; Marziliano, N.; Denny, J.C.; Shaffer, C.; El-Mokhtari, N.E.; Franke, A.; Heilmann, S.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Holmen, O.L.; Hveem, K.; Jansson, J.-H.; Jockel, K.-H.; Kessler, T.; Kriebel, J.; Laugwitz, K.L.; Marouli, E.; Martinelli, N.; McCarthy, M.I.; Van Zuydam, N.R.; Meisinger, C.; Esko, T.; Mihailov, E.; Escher, S.A.; Alver, M.; Moebus, S.; Morris, A.D.; Virtamo, J.; Nikpay, M.; Olivieri, O.; Provost, S.; AlQarawi, A.; Robertson, N.R.; Akinsansya, K.O.; Reilly, D.F.; Vogt, T.F.; Yin, W.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Kooperberg, C.; Jackson, R.D.; Stahl, E.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Strauch, K.; Varga, T.V.; Waldenberger, M.; Zeng, L.; Chowdhury, R.; Salomaa, V.; Ford, I.; Jukema, J.W.; Amouyel, P.; Kontto, J.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ferrieres, J.; Saleheen, D.; Sattar, N.; Surendran, P.; Wagner, A.; Young, R.; Howson, J.M.M.; Butterworth, A.S.; Danesh, J.; Ardissino, D.; Bottinger, E.P.; Erbel, R.; Franks, P.W.; Girelli, D.; Hall, A.S.; Hovingh, G.K.; Kastrati, A.; Lieb, W.; Meitinger, T.; Kraus, W.E.; Shah, S.H.; McPherson, R.; Orho-Melander, M.; Melander, O.; Metspalu, A.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Peters, A.; Rader, D.J.; Reilly, M.P.; Loos, R.J.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Roden, D.M.; Tardif, J.-C.; Thompson, J.R.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Willer, C.J.; Samani, N.J.; Schunkert, H.; Deloukas, P.; Kathiresan, S. url  doi
  Title Systematic Evaluation of Pleiotropy Identifies 6 Further Loci Associated With Coronary Artery Disease Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Journal of the American College of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal J Am Coll Cardiol  
  Volume 69 Issue 7 Pages 823-836  
  Keywords Case-Control Studies; Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology/*genetics; Female; Gene Frequency; *Genetic Loci; *Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Humans; Male; Odds Ratio; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; cholesteryl ester transfer protein; expression quantitative trait loci; genetics; genome-wide association; single nucleotide polymorphism  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have so far identified 56 loci associated with risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Many CAD loci show pleiotropy; that is, they are also associated with other diseases or traits. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to systematically test if genetic variants identified for non-CAD diseases/traits also associate with CAD and to undertake a comprehensive analysis of the extent of pleiotropy of all CAD loci. METHODS: In discovery analyses involving 42,335 CAD cases and 78,240 control subjects we tested the association of 29,383 common (minor allele frequency >5%) single nucleotide polymorphisms available on the exome array, which included a substantial proportion of known or suspected single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with common diseases or traits as of 2011. Suggestive association signals were replicated in an additional 30,533 cases and 42,530 control subjects. To evaluate pleiotropy, we tested CAD loci for association with cardiovascular risk factors (lipid traits, blood pressure phenotypes, body mass index, diabetes, and smoking behavior), as well as with other diseases/traits through interrogation of currently available genome-wide association study catalogs. RESULTS: We identified 6 new loci associated with CAD at genome-wide significance: on 2q37 (KCNJ13-GIGYF2), 6p21 (C2), 11p15 (MRVI1-CTR9), 12q13 (LRP1), 12q24 (SCARB1), and 16q13 (CETP). Risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.15 to 0.86, and odds ratio per copy of the risk allele ranged from 1.04 to 1.09. Of 62 new and known CAD loci, 24 (38.7%) showed statistical association with a traditional cardiovascular risk factor, with some showing multiple associations, and 29 (47%) showed associations at p < 1 x 10(-4) with a range of other diseases/traits. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 6 loci associated with CAD at genome-wide significance. Several CAD loci show substantial pleiotropy, which may help us understand the mechanisms by which these loci affect CAD risk.  
  Address Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts  
  Corporate Author Myocardial Infarction Genetics and CARDIoGRAM Exome Consortia Investigators Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-1097 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28209224; PMCID:PMC5314135 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2030  
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Author Vindenes, H.K.; Svanes, C.; Lygre, S.H.L.; Hollund, B.-E.; Langhammer, A.; Bertelsen, R.J. url  doi
  Title Prevalence of, and work-related risk factors for, hand eczema in a Norwegian general population (The HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2017 Publication Contact Dermatitis Abbreviated Journal Contact Dermatitis  
  Volume 77 Issue 4 Pages 214-223  
  Keywords Hunt; atopic dermatitis; epidemiology; hand eczema; occupational  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chemical exposures at work and at home may cause hand eczema. However, this has been scarcely described for Norway. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of, and occupational risk factors for, hand eczema in Norway. METHODS: Among 50 805 respondents (aged >/=20 years) to the third Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3), 5757 persons reported ever having hand eczema, and 4206 answered a hand eczema questionnaire. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalences of hand eczema were 8.4% in men and 13.8% in women (p < 0.001), with onset at age </=10 years in 24% (men) and 20% (women), and onset at age >/=30 years in 37% (men) and 25% (women) (p < 0.001). Work-related hand eczema affected 4.8% of the population, and was most frequently associated with health/social work (29%) and occupational cleaning (20%) in women, and with farming (26%) and industrial occupations (27%) in men. Cleaning detergents (75%) and other chemicals (36%) were the most common exacerbating factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hand eczema was 11.3%, and that of work-related hand eczema was 4.8%. Hand eczema was more common in women than in men, but with a later onset in men. Cleaning detergents were the most common aggravating factors. A large proportion of the Nord-Trondelag population is employed in farming, providing the possibility to identify farming as an important risk factor for hand eczema.  
  Address Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, 5021, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0105-1873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28449354 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2031  
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